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Soft Palate and High Notes

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PopVlad
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Hey Guys,

I would really appreciate it if someone could explain me the relationship between the high notes (say, C5 to F5) and a raised soft palate.

Is elevating one’s palate a prerequisite to reaching highs with ease? If not, does it facilitate that still?

Would keeping an open throat with a raised soft palate help me in performing, say, lip bubbles with more ease?

Thanks in advance,

Vlad

P.S. Apologies, if that’s already been covered somewhere…

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Is elevating one’s palate a prerequisite to reaching highs with ease? Would keeping an open throat with a raised soft palate help me in performing, say, lip bubbles with more ease?

i'd say "yes" two q.1, no to q.2

lip bubbles besides being a great warmup exercise are a barometer of your ability to support your tone.

the open throat will help more with lip bubbles than the raising of the soft pallatte, i.m.o..

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Raising the soft palate is a tool for darker tone quality, some people feel it helps their curbing above E4~, although is is not a requisite at all. Try experimenting with it and decide if you like the sound.

snorth,

yes, it can darken the sound, but when combined with twang, you can acheive more treble or an eq boost like steve said. i'm not cvt.

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I've found those lip bubbles a bit confusing recently. I've been doing them for about 2 years with the understanding that you never want to blow the air, but rather raise the sternum, relax, and let the air kind of seep out. When I do it this way, the core of the bubbles is a heady tone, and it is not at all taxing on my support muscles - it's fluid and easy, but lacks a full bodied sound. I've found recently, however, that if I blow air into the bubbles in a more firmly rooted, chestier setup, it's a pretty extreme workout for the abdomen and intercostals, a more full bodied sound, and much more difficult to sustain. Bob, does that sound more like the way you do them?

raph,

you can do chesty bubbles or heady bubbles or siren bubbles..it's all about warming up the folds and the bubbles being consistently bubbly, steady, not gaps, or variation, or stops in lip flapping. i don't think you want push the bubbles too hard though, i believe you want to strive for a nice motor-ish sound. does that help?

i do get days where i feel like i'm fighting them and i just need to relax and let them transition from chest to head.

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Ahhh I think I gotcha, thanks bob! I think I've been doing them too lazily for a couple years now. I can do loud, pretty seamless sirens, but if I open up and release the tone it's sort of a sloppy Irish tenor tone - nothing suitable for rock or soul. These last few days, when I've done them "chestier", I've REALLY felt the muscle action associated with good support: the waist and solar plexus kicking out, the lower abdomen moving slowly inward, etc. I have a lot to learn about keeping my shoulders, neck and jaw relaxed while my support muscles are heavily engaged, but it feels like a step in the right direction.

i'm right with ya buddy, trying to figure and sometimes re-figure this shit out....lol!!

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Thanks guys,

I guess I just wanted to understand wether the soft palate plays a role in helping achieve easier head voice.

As for the tone thing, I'm a bit confused, since I always thought that the arched soft palate helps brighten the tone, not overly darken it.

I thought that was the sole purpose of the "smile when you sing" approach.

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Thanks guys,

I guess I just wanted to understand wether the soft palate plays a role in helping achieve easier head voice.

As for the tone thing, I'm a bit confused, since I always thought that the arched soft palate helps brighten the tone, not overly darken it.

I thought that was the sole purpose of the "smile when you sing" approach.

yes, but if you slightly lower the larynx, you can achieve a darker tone.

the key word here is 'slightly."

raised soft palette, slightly raised larynx = twang, eq boost, more brighter sound

raised soft palette, slighty lowered larynx = deeper, darker sound (classical)

i personally believe the raised soft palette is an ideal configuration for most singing, but perhaps that's better for me. hope i've helped. bob

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I think you're incorrect about that one, Bob. It doesn't matter if you combine a raised soft palate with twang or not - it will still slightly darken the sound.

F.ex. I think that Lou Gramm uses lots of curbing in the high part of the voice with lots of twang and raised soft palate and only slightly raised larynx (using a yawn sensation to do so), but when he puts in a little rasp I'm pretty sure that his soft palate comes down slightly and his larynx may go up a bit, too.

And if you twang, have your soft palate very high and your larynx very low, then you get something that might resemble a classical/operatic sound.

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maybe it depends on the singer.

when i sing with a raised palette, and twang with a "slightly" raised larynx, i definitely get a brighter sound. my sam cooke and otis redding is achieved this way.

if i drop the larynx, key word though is "slightly" yes, it can darken, but you can get a control over the darkness. too low, i agree, it's gets kind of woofy, and dark.

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when i sing with a raised palette, and twang with a "slightly" raised larynx, i definitely get a brighter sound

Yes, but you'd get an even brighter sound if you'd drop the palate a bit. But you should do that unless you want to add "edge" to your sound and eventually distortion if you drop it even lower (assuming you have lots of twang, too). With a raised palate, yeah, you get that Sam Cooke sound.

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maybe it depends on the singer.

when i sing with a raised palette, and twang with a "slightly" raised larynx, i definitely get a brighter sound. my sam cooke and otis redding is achieved this way.

if i drop the larynx, key word though is "slightly" yes, it can darken, but you can get a control over the darkness. too low, i agree, it's gets kind of woofy, and dark.

Interesting...I practice Sam Cooke and Journey songs, but I have a problem capturing the "essence" of the "woah-ah-oh-ah-oh" phrases. By essence I mostly mean the sort of tonality that sounds trademark to Cooke.

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I thought the yawn motion lowered the larynx.

The yawn motion both lowers the larynx and raises the soft palate. Usually when the larynx goes up, the soft palate goes down and vice versa. However, these two motions can be trained to be done independently to a degree.

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The yawn motion both lowers the larynx and raises the soft palate. Usually when the larynx goes up, the soft palate goes down and vice versa. However, these two motions can be trained to be done independently to a degree.

yes, they can. that's been a great thing for me because i end up pushing much less than i used to.

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Interesting...I practice Sam Cooke and Journey songs, but I have a problem capturing the "essence" of the "woah-ah-oh-ah-oh" phrases. By essence I mostly mean the sort of tonality that sounds trademark to Cooke.

sam cooke is twang and thinking sam cooke...lol!!! otis redding is a similar vocal, but twang is a requisite. same with bon jovi, i love his clarity.

this whole twang thing is an incredible skill to have especially if you can adjust it.

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