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losing falsetto

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steve fraser had mentioned in a recent post that it's possible for a singer with training to lose their abilty to sing falsetto, particularly tenors.

i thought we'd all might want to find out why?

it seems to be happening to me..i remember i used to be able to hit that "to me" before the chorus in queen's "bohemian rhapsody" but seem to have lost it or i can't configure to it anymore.

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could be, steve is due here any moment.

What Matt said. The habits of good fold closure and support become so ingrained that the falsetto coordination (which requires that some muscles not play well in the coordination) is lost to great habit.

I know one tenor that had to _learn_ falsetto as an adult, as his voice had just drifted down into a lyric voice, and a coordinated one at that.

The recipe for falsetto is to take an aspirate H and overblow it. Falsetto vocal fold motion is windy. Start the wind, and then make a sound like blowing over a coke bottle.... that gets it every time.

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steve,

maybe a dumb question, but i'll ask anyway..

are you saying this is desirous, meaning something to shoot for? would it go to say that you are then producing in head voice what you used to produce in falsetto because training has given you the strength or agility to close the folds?

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maybe a dumb question, but i'll ask anyway..

are you saying this is desirous, meaning something to shoot for? would it go to say that you are then producing in head voice what you used to produce in falsetto because training has given you the strength or agility to close the folds?

Bob: not dumb at all. IMO, it depends on where the singer is in development, and what the goals are. Pedagogically, falsetto is advocated by some very good teachers as a way for a larger, lower voice to stimulate vocal fold thinning and range-of-motion. Some, also very good teachers, don't bother with it... they go right to the coordinated voice, and use different exercises.

It comes down to this: If you want falsetto to be a timbre that you can use in performance, you should practice it so you can keep it current. If its a means-to-an-end, then do it for a while as a 'leg-up' on the softer textured head voice, and then let it go.

You choose.

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This topic makes me wonder something, too. A few times, recently, I lost fine control and it seemed like a struggle to get good adduction through part of my range. Since both instances happened after trying a twangy rattle (and I was probably doing it wrong because it felt like a constriction of the throat), I assumed it was that. Kind of a process of elimination. "What was the last thing you did before losing?" sort of deduction. But yet, in some ways I could still sing in head voice with lots of support. In fact, when I did my most recent recording of "Heaven and Hell," I was still suffering from that malady. And I regain fine control by practicing descending sirens as lightly as I can, basically, I think, like trying to re-train falsetto. But I just had a wild thought that maybe it was a combo of strain from the one exercise, and maybe new habit of fuller cord closer, better support, etc. I'm probably overthinking it.

Because, on the other hand, when I haven't tried that rattle distortion, I can sing full voice easily all through and still have the fine control, and still do falsetto, as well. Sometimes, ending a full note by messa de voce-ing to falsetto.

Uhh, I guess I'm still overthinking it.

Again, Steven totally rocks. It is a stylistic choice. I like falsetto for some things, as a timbre or sound choice or whatever you want to call it, as well as the breaking-glass-and-flattening-the-mic-response sonic blast.

It's just with that malady, I didn't have the fine control I am used to having, full or falsetto. I wasn't treated for it, just following the basic advice if something hurts or causes loss of voice or loss of control, don't do that. Kind of like going to the doctor and saying, "Doc, it hurts when I move my arm this high." Doctor says, "Well, then, quit doing that."

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Bob: not dumb at all. IMO, it depends on where the singer is in development, and what the goals are. Pedagogically, falsetto is advocated by some very good teachers as a way for a larger, lower voice to stimulate vocal fold thinning and range-of-motion. Some, also very good teachers, don't bother with it... they go right to the coordinated voice, and use different exercises.

It comes down to this: If you want falsetto to be a timbre that you can use in performance, you should practice it so you can keep it current. If its a means-to-an-end, then do it for a while as a 'leg-up' on the softer textured head voice, and then let it go.

You choose.

steve, (folks)...

prior to training, i used to be able to easily do "dream on"...just to see i tried doing the.. "dream on, the ah ah, ah" part.

i tried those highs at the end, and they were nowhere, i mean nowhere to be found. steve, how do go about getting that back again?

in simple terms please?

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Wow. This forum is great! Steve, could you possibly be a little more descriptive in the "aspirated H" instructions. Thank you.

This is precisely my issue. I had a sports injury to the throat, started singing using poor compensatory technique while still injured. I was rehabbed properly at UConn's otolaryngology clinic and now sing better than before the injury - and properly as well. But, I've been losing my falsetto as my singing has become better and range has increased. Notes that I used to be able to sing in falsetto now sometimes sound like I'm singing through a fan, but I can sing the notes in either passagio or full voice.

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