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Whiskey In The Jar (Karaoke)

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Snejk
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Haha!!! A frequent flier from the pub uploaded this just now...

Disclaimer; I was drunk as HELL!!!!

Still it's really fun because I just don't have raspy voice in the least... Doing what I do here totally ruins any overdrive I have which is very audible in the clip xD

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I thought you had quite a range of dynamics. A really good job on the Hetfield growl. Juxtaposed with your light, clear tone in the improvs. Totally outstanding performance moves. Was that a friend helping you mosh during the earlier part?

Don't take this the wrong way as it is meant totally as a compliment but you have pretty boy looks. Not just handsome but pretty. Your performance and style reminded me of Sebastian Bach. I'm sure the blinding blonde hair has something to do with it but so does your chin and cheekbone structure. You have what it takes to be a phenomenon. Striking good looks. Solid voice. Charisma and the ability to interact with the audience in various stages of inebriation.

This song, specfically Metallica's cover of the Thin Lizzy cover of the Luke Kelly and the Dubliners version of an old irish highwayman song is in the baritone range because that is what Hetfield is. And this allows for the thick growl and belted notes. Luke Kelly is a tenor and sings it in that range. But the great thing about this song is that it is easily transposed and doesn't lose its flavor.

Man it's tempting me to revive my acoustic version of the original Luke Kelly recording, with my new mic. I may just have to do that for my own entertainment.

You couldn't have been too drunk because it takes the right amount of tension and suppleness to sing and perform. That's why most karaoke events with most people is problematic. Most people, already singing incorrectly, drink until they are too relaxed, and then sing.

Others drink some in order to psychologically relax, which helps them to not clench up.

Anyway, it looks like you had a lot of fun and that's what is really important.

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Thanks for the kind words ron!! When I'm sober I stand entirely still singing while looking down at the floor haha!!! :P The guys who hop in and do stuff.. I have no idea who they are really but I guess they were cool! :D I love that... :}~

Really big thanks for the looks haha... Never heard that one before! :OOO This night was very weird because 3 (THREE!!!) different people came to me that night and said "Hey man, nice singing.. You're very feminine though!" and two of them asked if I was gay or bi :o That was very weird!

I have not heard The Dubliners version yet but I figure I have some homework to do then :D This song really is perfect in my range there... Unfortunately all rock bands who search for singers want a lyrical tenor.. Something I can't offer so I'm now bandless... Makes me feel like I got nothing to offer good and serious musicians! :(

But I would really LOVE to hear you do the Luke Kelly version!!! Please put it up for listen, you have a fantastic technique when you sing :3

And hmm... I guess you need some sort of connection to reality in order to be able to sing somewhat decent but prior to that song everything became a haze haha :3

Thanks again!!

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Well, thank you. As a matter of fact, I just recorded it and uploaded to dropbox. So, while I am waiting for that to refresh in the page. Let me go and find the Luke Kelly and the Dubliners recording.

By the way, I think you were hitting some tenor notes. And I think you could do higher notes by sticking with the lighter phonation.

shuffle, shuffle, click, click....

"Whiskey in the Jar" by Luke Kelly and the Dubliners. Note that the chorus is led by the bass singer. However, Luke, a tenor, is the one with the banjo, red shirt, and blazing red mess of hair.

My version, closer to theirs than modern versions, is still different. Mine is shorter by a couple of stanzas. I have something of a Texas Swing in my rhythm, I think. And I have a different vocal cadence in the chorus, different from theirs and other famous versions. Thanks for letting me play in your thread.

One take, no patches, live (playing guitar and singing at the same time.) Just for giggles, I opened a beer for this (mood setting.)

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8750209/Whiskey%20in%20the%20Jar.mp3

When I do have a hard drink, my favorite is scotch, specifically, Glenfiddich Special Reserve (single malt). The 12 year 5th costs about $42 USD ($43 - $44 Euro ?) here, so, I don't buy it very often. It tastes very good, so I don't want to make it a habit. I don't even have any in the house, right now. Just one of those special treats, once in a great while. Two fingers worth, served neat in an old fashioned glass with a Diet Coke chaser.

And I certainly didn't want to imply that you were gay, or that I was and I couldn't possibly care less about that, one way or the other. To put it another way, you've got that thing that women usually respond to. Me, I've never been a pretty boy. Look at my pic on my profile on the main site. I look like a Hell's Angel, even with short hair. My wife likes that look and all of her old friends were bikers. So, I lucked out, there.

I think you can sing counter-tenor, but it will take the lighter phonation you used on the higher parts of your performance. But, all in all, right now, in the more popular music, baritone is leading the way. So, you could proably do anything you wanted in music, right now.

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Wow man that sounded really great! You take those higher notes so easy without them sounding strained or shouted at all... Does it feel effortless as well? Really good job and I must say that you've improved ALOT this last year!!! It was a treat!

Regarding tenor notes, how do one know what is what? My absolutely favorite singer, Michael Kiske is apparently NOT a high tenor regardless of him singing extremely high notes without falsetto, meanwhile Klaus Meine who doesn't sing as high as Kiske is a real tenor? I guess Kiske has a 'thicker' sound to his notes while Meine has a feathery light tone...?

Anywho, my dream is being a tenor and I can sing light but only to a certain height before I need to swap to falsetto. Was karaoke night last night as well (who woula thunk it! xD) and I sung "Rock you like a hurricane" by The Scorpions.. It doesn't go very high but the verse is sung in a very light manner which I think is really beautiful and I managed to nail every note.. It was really fun!

Hahaha no I know!! I was just caught off guard because I have never once in my life been called good looking haha!! And at that same night I got called femininte more times than I can count by random people... Just funny! :3 I did get a number from a cute chick yesterday and luckily she did not wonder wether or not I wore a bra! I couldn't find you on the main site though, curiousity got the better of me :p

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Here's my page.

http://www.themodernvocalist.com/profile/RonStone

You were probably looking under ronws.

Functionally, tenor is a range of notes. What is different is how a person sings tenor. For example, a lyric tenor has a light tone to their voice, like Robert Plant. A dramatic tenor has dark, heavy tones to their voice. Bruce Dickinson is considered a dramatic tenor. Though he could sing higher, he stays around the 3 kHz mark because he can belt that and have the feeling he wants. Klause Meine is probably a lyric tenor.

It's also possible to be a tenor and not realize it because one's upper notes felt light and the even the singer himself assumes that is falsetto. Or, better yet, my favorite funny phrase, "reinforced falsetto." The real thing about falsetto is that it is not reinforced. True, you can resonate it but too much air is escaping to be a full note. But it is certainly possible to have a light, full tone and it is not falsetto, even if it feels light. You think, "that can't be a real note because it doesn't feel like the notes in my baritone range." Well, you've answered your own question. The higher notes will sound tonally different. And there's a number of hard rock and heavy metal singers that could sing higher but prefer to remain around the top of their chest voice because that is where they can get the heaviest distortion for their style of music.

I am certain I have improved. I think my resonance is brighter, all around. My breath support is better. A few times, I think I have set myself back trying something from here, even if it's just a matter of me doing it wrong. But, on average, I am doing better, especially in recording. Two things there. 1) I have a real mic, now and you can actually hear my voice. Most people won't understand the physics behind it but think about it. If mics didn't make a difference, then Heil and Rode would be out of business, wouldn't they? 2) If I think something doesn't sound right, I will re-record it. I am used to singing live, where there are no do-overs. You have to make it fly right then. And you will make mistakes. Everyone does. But, live, you just roll on through because stopping brings attention to a mistake. Recording, not so. Any little mistake is there for eternity and it throws everyone off their game. Especially, as these days, they are used to hearing professionally recorded music and every recording engineer uses autotune on every voice, regardless of who it is. But still, for the most part, I record the vocals in one take. Where I have had a problem, I erase just before the problem and start a new track where I left off and sing the rest of it to finish. So, the recordings are getting better.

I'm still learning about this interface and its input levels. And I still use mic placement as a volume control. I lean away for high, powerful notes and in for low, softer notes. But even from two feet away, I can still overload the mic.

Yeah, the high notes are actually quite easy for me. It's mainly resonance. Take all strain out of the throat. Support the note with steady air and let the note rise to the soft palate. That means a slight smile, which you already know about.

But don't knock falsetto. You were singing as high as Bono. He uses falsetto for some of his highest notes. The breathy quality of his falsetto brings so much emotion that it would be a shame if he lost that. And yes, I notice that Klaus doesn't sing as high as others. But I also think he lightens up in his highest notes, whether he realizes it or not. But he also gets some rasp in there, which makes the note sound "meatier."

Also, falsetto is a good way to place your notes, at the beginning. Then, by changing to slight cackle, you can adduct, and by raising the soft palate with either a soft yawn or a smile, you open up the bony cavities in your head, which is where the high notes resonate. It will feel like your head is ringing. You might feel a buzz behind your eyes.

Oh, and the other trick to recording is using compression. But you may not have those things. I notice you mainly record on your phone, which may be all you have. But even so, I can hear good sound in your voice, in spite of the limits of a 3 cm mic.

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Snejk, that was cool and fun to see.

My version, closer to theirs than modern versions, is still different. Mine is shorter by a couple of stanzas. I have something of a Texas Swing in my rhythm, I think. And I have a different vocal cadence in the chorus, different from theirs and other famous versions. Thanks for letting me play in your thread.

One take, no patches, live (playing guitar and singing at the same time.) Just for giggles, I opened a beer for this (mood setting.)

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8750209/Whiskey%20in%20the%20Jar.mp3

Ron, that may have been your best performance so far. So I guess you're always improving. I'd guess that the difference between this take and many of you other takes was that 1) you were more relaxed than often before and 2) you've learned a lot from this forum :) . Cheers.

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Snejk, that was cool and fun to see.

Ron, that may have been your best performance so far. So I guess you're always improving. I'd guess that the difference between this take and many of you other takes was that 1) you were more relaxed than often before and 2) you've learned a lot from this forum :) . Cheers.

Agreed on both. Thanks, jonpall.

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