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Running out of steam

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Noah
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I'm new here so I'm sorry if there's already a post on this.

I find that when singing several songs in a row, my higher notes tire out. When I first start singing, I can sing just fine high and low, but as I go on the higher notes require more force and effort which does not feel or sound healthy.

As I'm typing this, I'm starting to think that there is a number of possibilities for why this is happening. nevertheless, does any one have some tips or know why this is happening? is it a breath thing? any thing would be nice.

Thanks,

-Noah

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I'm new here so I'm sorry if there's already a post on this.

I find that when singing several songs in a row, my higher notes tire out. When I first start singing, I can sing just fine high and low, but as I go on the higher notes require more force and effort which does not feel or sound healthy.

As I'm typing this, I'm starting to think that there is a number of possibilities for why this is happening. nevertheless, does any one have some tips or know why this is happening? is it a breath thing? any thing would be nice.

Welcome, Noah! To start, if you are interested to search the site for posts with key words, go up top to the forum navbar, and click on 'search'.

Even then, its fine to post the same question as others already have. Some topics never lose their relevance. Ask away!

Yes, its a breath thing, and a work thing. No mystery. The only reasons that the top gets harder through the several songs in a row, is that just a bit too much work is being done each song, with not enough recovery time.

You can work this issue from both angles. The easiest one from a vocal technique perspective is simply to spread the songs out a little, so you get 20 or 30 seconds extra vocal rest between songs. As an alternative, re-map a tune so that there is an instrumental interlude here and there.

The more challenging angle is to re-work the vocalism of the high range, in 3 ways: 1) add some twang to everything, especially the middle voice, but also the top. Twang will make all the tones more powerful, and is also easier on the vocal bands... less strain. 2) lessen the breath pressure, by inhaling less at the beginning of each phrase. 3) sing slightly more resonant vowels.

A combination of both of these approaches will work very well. Try 'em out, and let us know.

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Depends on how many songs. Daily practice, I usually run through about 5 or 6 songs. If I am tired, I will do the high songs first. As I wear down, I do the low songs. Then, on other days, I reverse. I do the low songs to warm up and then do the high stuff. Plenty of times, though, I alternate a high and low song. It allows the voice to rest from either extreme. And I have been doing this for so long that it's tough on me in recording if I have to sing the same song over and over. My voice is used to the variety and stretching. As opposed to setting the same configuration over and over.

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