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Adding more head voice...any advice?

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LuiC345
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OK, so this is how it goes. I've got a chest and head voice (not flipping to falsetto, so no more flips, cracks or breaks) that I can execute whilst doing warm ups and warm downs, nay/mum/etc. excersises. I can now use the right amount of compression to keep the vocal cords connected through their breaks. But I can't apply it to singing, issues are I use too much compression or use too less.

So just asking how can you have a balance of vocal compression while SINGING?

And another one, I'm currently working on the 6th disc of Singing Success (Technique 4), and how can you sing more lighter? (That's how Brett M. told me in the program, and by having more head, you can have a "fluty" light sound along with your chesty, rich, thick sound to make a good mixed voice) Because this is usually how a professional Speech Level Singing singer/coach go in their range.

Chest---->Mixed (More Chest, Less Head)------>Mixed (Same amount of chest and head)------> Mixed (Less Chest, More Head)------> Pure Head

So if you look at the third mixed (less chest, more head) I believe if I wanna sing easy, I got use a lighter vocal coordination, not to thicken my vocal cords and make it hard. So how can you do that more efficiently?

Thank you!

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OK, so this is how it goes. I've got a chest and head voice (not flipping to falsetto, so no more flips, cracks or breaks) that I can execute whilst doing warm ups and warm downs, nay/mum/etc. excersises. I can now use the right amount of compression to keep the vocal cords connected through their breaks. But I can't apply it to singing, issues are I use too much compression or use too less.

So just asking how can you have a balance of vocal compression while SINGING?

And another one, I'm currently working on the 6th disc of Singing Success (Technique 4), and how can you sing more lighter? (That's how Brett M. told me in the program, and by having more head, you can have a "fluty" light sound along with your chesty, rich, thick sound to make a good mixed voice) Because this is usually how a professional Speech Level Singing singer/coach go in their range.

Chest---->Mixed (More Chest, Less Head)------>Mixed (Same amount of chest and head)------> Mixed (Less Chest, More Head)------> Pure Head

So if you look at the third mixed (less chest, more head) I believe if I wanna sing easy, I got use a lighter vocal coordination, not to thicken my vocal cords and make it hard. So how can you do that more efficiently?

Thank you!

i guess it would depend on the song and the notes within that song...got a song example?

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OK, so this is how it goes. I've got a chest and head voice (not flipping to falsetto, so no more flips, cracks or breaks) that I can execute whilst doing warm ups and warm downs, nay/mum/etc. excersises. I can now use the right amount of compression to keep the vocal cords connected through their breaks. But I can't apply it to singing, issues are I use too much compression or use too less.

So just asking how can you have a balance of vocal compression while SINGING?

LuiC345: Hi. I think this is the first time I written in response to you. Welcome to the Forum.

To answer your question, I 'd like to explain what causes, in terms of body-part positioning, what people call 'compression'.

The sensation of compression comes from the interaction of adduction (the motion of the vocal bands together, closing the glottis) and of registration (the pitch-control mechanism) as they work with the exhalation force. Especially important in this is how much the Thyro-arytenoid muscle (the one inside the vocal bands) is flexed. Like any muscle, flexing it thickens it, and in the case of the vocal bands, the thickness goes not only side-to-side, but up-and-down.

The effect of this is that the vocal bands touch each other in the closed phase (the time the glottis is shut in each open/close cycle) not only on their edges, but also in depth, top to bottom. If this muscle is not active, then the vocal bands are much looser, and they are top-to-bottom thinner too... so they cannot provide as much resistance to the exhalation.

From this principle, maintaining the sense of 'compression' is really about maintaining appropriate involvement of this muscle thoughout the range. Not too much, but not too little either.

Now, how to do that. IMO, the very best way to get at this is to connect the ranges of the voice in continuous sound... via sirens scales and arpeggios. The vowels that are easiest to do when beginning are the ones which are 'closed', that is, /i/ (ee) and /u/ (oo). On upward siren, scale or arpeggio patterns, these two vowels have the lowest passaggio entry points, and the earliest head voice entry.

That is where I recommend you begin to move to address the development you seek next:

The progression is generally to noises (siren) to scales (with slides between the notes) to clean scales and on to arpeggios. The feeling in the throat, and of the vocal production, is the same for all of these. The difference is in your mind... the frequencies that you think in your mental pitch-imagination.

The principle is to carry over to note patterns the same phonation as you learned in the siren. Interestingly, its your mind that decides, by how you conceptualize the note to make, how you will go from note to note. If you employ a siren-concept, you will get a siren. If you emply a scale with slides between the notes, then that is what you will get. The only fundamental difference between a siren and a scale is that you slide faster in a scale, and you sustain certain notes when you are not sliding ;-)

Once a scale is connected with these very rapid, soft slides, then arpeggios are just wider intervals performed with the same approach. For this reason, classical vocal pedagogy spends a great deal of time doing these simple scales and arpeggios... it addresses the experiences that you have identified that you need.

I hope this helps.

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This is not the Emperor's new clothes. You are not considered dumb if you didn't understand Steven's post.

:)

Here's an exercise that has helped me bridge the gap between scales and songs:

Sing an upwards scale, arpeggio or siren (whichever you prefer) on any vowel you prefer in your SLS workout, ending in your mix range, and sustain the top note (make it very long). Now, just a second or two after you get to the top note, say some random scentece on that same pitch, keeping the same feeling in your throat as when you did the scale. You are effectively going from a scale to a song in one continuous breath (even though currently the words are all on the same pitch).

Here you'll find that you have to really modify the vowels and even the consonants to make it sound good and easily produced in your mix voice. It may sound funny and/or wrong at first but if it doesn't hurt your throat, you're on a right track. Try to modify the vowels in this or that direction until your sound starts to get a bit fuller and has more bite to it at the same time.

So this could sound something like this:

uuuuuuuhhhhIIIIII didn't understaaaaand. uuuuuuuhhhhthaaaaaaa last poooooost.

uh uh

a a

a a

Just ask if this is unclear.

Another very similar exercise is to alternate between a scale and a melody with words, using the exact same notes for the scale and the words. So f.ex. if you were to practise the Star spangled banner you could go: Mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, muuuuum, .... Oh say can you seeeeee - using the same melody for the mum, mum stuff and the "Oh say can you see" part. You could also use something else than mum. Perhaps just a single vowel with no consonant in front.

p.s. sorry Steven my friend, lol. It took me a while to understand your posts a few months ago, but now I consider them to be a gold mine. But I didn't understand sh#t at first :) . That may have been just me.

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This is not the Emperor's new clothes. You are not considered dumb if you didn't understand Steven's post.

<snip>

p.s. sorry Steven my friend, lol. It took me a while to understand your posts a few months ago, but now I consider them to be a gold mine. But I didn't understand sh#t at first :) . That may have been just me.

jonpall: You made me smile with your post :-) I thought the exercises were wonderfull.

Everybody writes and understands these things through the filter of their experience. IMO, the more voices, the better. Its part of what makes this community great.

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It all starts with the onset. Focus on your onset, make sure your onset has the right fold closure and other elements that you want in your singing... then, proceed with your siren workouts. Calibrate twang contractions to throttle your compression. Generally speaking, you want to have enough compression to remove the "wind" from your phonation.

Let me know if that makes any sense to you?

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