Felipe Carvalho

Review of Twang and Squillo Research

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   A few more thoughts on the video.

  The Hyoglossus muscle (That she supposes in the video is the tongue root) attaches to the hyoid bone. From what I understand about muscles, this means that the hyoglossus could only bring the Hyoid and tongue closer together. So, Tongue root is NOT the hyoglossus. 

   This still does not mean that the Fauchtinger idea has nothing to do with squillo or the ability to close the epiglottis. The Tongue root is more likely an intrinsic muscle of the tongue. These musles are attached to each other and their action is what allows the tongue to change its shape so easily.

   Another thing to take note of. When first mentioning TWANG, she mentions the Palatopharyngeus muscles and the Uvular area of the throat. She also mentions that they are drawn together and too high in the throat for the Scope to see. Then she never mentions it again but shows the narrowed Pharynx and closed piriform sinuses.  It would have been a small matter to place a camera at the opening of the mouth to see if the Palatopharyngeus were indeed drawn together in this configuration. 

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Another few thoughts if there is anyone out there reading......I had a chance to try these ideas "the middle constrictor muscle" as the catalyst for twang and the Root of the Tongue for Squillo or just a means of getting better vocal fold closure......

Getting permission to USE the throat and its constrictors is almost like a birthday present to someone who keeps hearing "nothing in the throat" or "Open Throat".

Also being ALLOWED to use the tongue muscles is in itself a breakthrough of sorts.

I mentioned being able to sing in the upper range using "Other Voices" well, that pretty much gave me permission to use these ideas. To make your voice sound like someone else you use all kinds of distortions of your own vocal posture that in SINGING it is not allowed. Trying to sing in that range "Without distorting" the vocal tract or 'Manipulation" of any kind was the problem.

   So Felipe, Have you tried your song again while Purposely narrowing the pharynx for Twang or using the tongue root for brightness of tone?

I have to say that both of these ideas had me singing D4 through A4 without sounding overly silly as usual.

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What are your thoughts on the video?  I have given all kinds of thoughts. Right or wrong they are only what was brought to my mind and a starting point for discussion. They do not need to be correct.

Is it better or more beneficial to not use narrowing by consciously manipulating the pharynx or tongue root, or by trying to find these coordinations by Breath pressure, sound ideals and "Free" "Relaxed" throat?

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I think it's a plausible explanation for twang and it gives a mechanical context for it that, in my opinion, was pretty much lacking up to now, and with it the possibility of breaking it down and controlling on much more detail.

For example, we can ask: Well what does it sound like when we do it? One of the replies is of course, twang, but that would be not very different from what we had before.

But when we think of the mechanics there are consonants on Arabian languages for example that are based on articulation with epiglottal stops/fricatives/plosives/trills. What if we can use those sounds as a tool to map what is going on in that area? A gesture that is really no different from saying a consonant like T or P (just a different constriction place).

I think something like this could be pretty significant because it allows precision when working with high intensity sounds, and with it more protection from injury and so forth.

I do not see it as a replacement for other techniques, but twang is core to almost everything we do, if we can control it better...

Ill try to put some samples together this weekend on a same song.

My hope is to reach a clear definition that allows something like what I did with the *middle voice vowels* video, a step by step guide to it that works for a large number of people and relies less on imitation and more on simple mechanical gestures. Then again... It's not the first time I find some promising ideas on this sense lol

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21 minutes ago, Felipe Carvalho said:

I think it's a plausible explanation for twang and it gives a mechanical context for it that, in my opinion, was pretty much lacking up to now, and with it the possibility of breaking it down and controlling on much more detail.

For example, we can ask: Well what does it sound like when we do it? One of the replies is of course, twang, but that would be not very different from what we had before.

But when we think of the mechanics there are consonants on Arabian languages for example that are based on articulation with epiglottal stops/fricatives/plosives/trills. What if we can use those sounds as a tool to map what is going on in that area? A gesture that is really no different from saying a consonant like T or P (just a different constriction place).

I think something like this could be pretty significant because it allows precision when working with high intensity sounds, and with it more protection from injury and so forth.

I do not see it as a replacement for other techniques, but twang is core to almost everything we do, if we can control it better...

Ill try to put some samples together this weekend on a same song.

My hope is to reach a clear definition that allows something like what I did with the *middle voice vowels* video, a step by step guide to it that works for a large number of people and relies less on imitation and more on simple mechanical gestures. Then again... It's not the first time I find some promising ideas on this sense lol

Exactly, I know that it is not the best way to "Sing" but having a mechanical description of a configuration will get you in the "Ball park" so to speak. A general area.

There are sounds that I have never made before so when someone just says "Make this sound" and go from there...I am lost and have been lost. One is the "SOUND" of covering in the sense of Classical singing. The SOUND is a result of a configuration, not a cause.

I have gotten closer because of some of your own videos, but that was because you used "Sounds" that I was familiar with and put them together. Like the Dopey Yawn sound and adding the "Sound" of twang to bring that dopey sound forward.

Just experimenting a few minutes ago I could sing between E4 and G4 by just(it seemed to me) narrowing on purpose as described in this video. Did other things happen too? Probably. But I would lock up before without using a lot of effort. The only effort was Constricting(Lightly) above the larynx. Perhaps other things inside the larynx were able to do there thing easier because of the change in the pharynx.

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People think of Pitch as a vocal fold configuration. A combination of Thickness of the vocal folds,How tight they are together, the length of the cords and perhaps how fast the air is flowing through them.

As I mentioned before the voice has many different aspects that coincide with different instruments. Wind, reed, string etc.

For example: A steam Whistle...Fixed tube and opening. Air pressure changes the pitch. As the steam pressure rises the pitch goes from low to high.

How about those who make sounds with jugs of water: you blow across the top of the opening and the size of the chamber determines pitch. Adding and removing water changes the pitch. How hard you blow does not make a difference....just the SIZE of the tube, or space within the jug.

A similar thing with Horns. How about a slide trombone? It is not the amount of air pressure but the length of tube that changes the pitch.

And then of course you have the string aspect of changing the size of the thing that is vibrating, the vocal folds.

The voice uses all of these. In vocal pedagogy normally ONLY the length or thickness of the vocal folds is taken into account, TA and CT involvement and HOW the vibration may be different. The other aspects are not taken into account when PITCH is discussed.

I could be wrong but the term "Registers" for the voice came from the Pipe organ. I believe, in the pipe organ, one set of "Registers" consist of a certain number of Pipes of the same diameter but the length is different.This gives one set of pitches. once you get to a certain pitch the next "Register" is made of another set of pipes with the Same diameter to each other but different from the other "Register" with differing lengths for that group of pitches.

What I do not know about the pipe organ is if Each "Register" has it own sound source or if the same source is channeled to each register.

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Is anyone understanding what I am suggesting here? At a certain point in the voice it is beneficial to narrow(constrict) or widen(expand) the entire pharynx to adjust pitch. Not just certain areas such as the mouth or Epiglottic sphincter.  Is there a reason that I am off track?

Also the difference between a strong Falsetto sounding High voice like Berry Gibb and a clean but adducted sound like DIO could be in whether or not the Piriform sinuses are closed off or open.

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Alright, so here is my testing with the idea:

https://app.box.com/s/hya3ds8wkjh4jckfe5be7n508q3tojfl

Sorry for the delay, my voice was crappy this past week (sick) and I had to train the idea properly first, I did what I proposed before, using the Arabian consonants to get a hang of the coordination. To me it feels like the larynx is pushing up while the back of the tongue is pushing down, not in a uncomfortable manner, more like the feeling of articulating a K with the back of the tongue and the soft palate (it constricts but it can be done gently without forcing).

The sample is supposed to be different levels of the constriction as far as I am able to control, say 100%, 70, 30, 0. I think you can hear the difference in... twangyness?

I personally think the 2nd and 3rd samples are within what I would consider useful for my voice and my tastes, and the other two more of an effect. Also I did what I needed to do to avoid distortion, You can hear that the most constricted one is all open, I think its my best Labrie impersonation so far lol, and the less constricted one is super dopey and silly.

Now, its not that the sounds are particularly new to me, I could do all of these well with the exception of the Labrie one, but most importantly I feel its a very useful position leading to sound situation.

 

On 7/12/2019 at 4:26 PM, MDEW said:

Is anyone understanding what I am suggesting here? At a certain point in the voice it is beneficial to narrow(constrict) or widen(expand) the entire pharynx to adjust pitch. Not just certain areas such as the mouth or Epiglottic sphincter.  Is there a reason that I am off track?

Also the difference between a strong Falsetto sounding High voice like Berry Gibb and a clean but adducted sound like DIO could be in whether or not the Piriform sinuses are closed off or open.

I dont think you are off track, its just that these two ways to look at the problem are not mutually exclusive. I think you can learn to control better one specific aspect of the coordination, and I think everything so far suggests that you dont get a given result due to just one adjustment. For example on my first sample here I am pretty sure the pharynx is constricted compared to the other ones because of the vowels I am producing, and I am also pretty sure the closure levels on the vocal folds are highest on the 1st and lowest on the 4th.

The 2nd sample is probably the most dynamic in all these aspects (stuff changing more), because its my normal/best game.

The samples are compensated for loudness so that its easier to compare the quality.

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A couple of questions. Were these examples the "Twang" with the narrowing of the pharynx cutting off the Piriform sinuses or the Tongue root idea?

and " Did you find that you could enter the Passaggio easier with less Breath Pressure?

The two Middle examples were more consistent with a "Full voice" sound without sounding modified or "Fake".

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