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Felipe Carvalho

Review of Twang and Squillo Research

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On 8/13/2019 at 4:44 PM, MDEW said:

I am in no way claiming I have answers, but I am saying that in all the research the ending tag is "more research is necessary". It is worth looking into the implications of the observations in this video.

Of course. Voice science is evolving just like most other sciences.

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23 hours ago, Felipe Carvalho said:

@Martin H on a total different subject, what are your thoughts on the parameter CVT defines as density? In special how foundation level curbing includes RD Edge and RD Overdrive as possible variations.

According to their study:

https://www.jvoice.org/article/S0892-1997(18)30040-7/abstract

Reduced "density" results in les overall narrowing of the supraglottic structures, lower sound pressure levels (SPL) and a lower Qx (contact quotient). Also they conclude that curbing and RD Edge and RD Overdrive are different:

"Comparison of Curbing with Overdrive and Edge sung with a reduced density showed that laryngeal gestures as well as MDVP and LTAS measurements differ" (p.12)

Although I don't agree with their interpretations of the laryngoscopic data, that RD is a result of thyroid cartilage "tilt". Just like the "tilt "in Estill is also questionable. The data is more in accordance with the degree of narrowing of the thyrohyoid space described by Fink.

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On 8/13/2019 at 3:44 PM, MDEW said:

I am in no way claiming I have answers, but I am saying that in all the research the ending tag is "more research is necessary".

Usually implies that the conclusions of the research are tentative.

And that research that gave the 1/6 ratio is really odd, just from a mathematical modelling perspective. A ratio, like 1/6, is what is called a "dimensionLESS quantity". A quantity like 3kHz is a dimensionAL quantity (dimensions of 1/time). Relating dimensional quantities to dimensionless quantities, like that, is not expected in a quality research paper.

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2 hours ago, Martin H said:

Although I don't agree with their interpretations of the laryngoscopic data, that RD is a result of thyroid cartilage "tilt". Just like the "tilt "in Estill is also questionable. The data is more in accordance with the degree of narrowing of the thyrohyoid space described by Fink.

I wonder... say if you do two notes on your comfortable mid range, say A3, one in very reduced density neutral, and another on full density overdrive, and monitor the cricothyroid space, instead of the thyrohyoid space, with your finger, do you perceive a change?

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Just now, Martin H said:

@Felipe Carvalho

Yes, when changing pitch. Ex a glissando from low to high or reverse.  Both with sound and silently. The cricothyroid visor is mainly related to pitch.

I can change it without the pitch change that´s why I am asking, listen:

https://app.box.com/s/9yblwz026yoc3ffwikf1ehw8p1qxbcij

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@Felipe Carvalho

Yes, sounds right. And it's interesting if you feel a difference in the cricothyroid visor. It would be great to see an MRI study in regards to the "tilt". They also mention this in the study I cited earlier:

"Another potentially important finding is that the laryngeal tilt mechanism is independent of pitch production and can be related to a variation of density or “weightiness” of a sung note. This is a line of inquiry that warrants further investigation, such as studies of women, across various pitches, and from methods such as MRI or EMG." 

https://www.jvoice.org/article/S0892-1997(18)30040-7/abstract

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