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korwynkim

Vocal fry while singing a note?

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Does anyone ever experience a rattle or a fry like noise while sustaining a note?

It's subtle and easier to hear when singing quietly. Sometimes it almost sounds like there is an additional note sounding below the sung note. This usually gets worse over the period of 10-15 minutes of singing. After a few hours of rest, it "resets" back to the original level of rattling, then proceeds to get worse again as I sing. This happens even if I focus on good breath support along with not making pressed phonation or overcompressing my vocal folds.

I just finished my last lesson before moving and won't have access to a teacher for a while. I'm not sure if this is a sign of normal wear or something worse. I want to keep practicing but I also don't want to cause long term damage.

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Is it that you don't want the sound, or that you only want to know what causes it?Your three examples are on the -ah- vowel. What happens if you change the vowel?

-eh- as in red

-aw- as in door

Then -ay- as in day

Then -oo- as in boot and -ee- as in meet.

Can you post those five examples the same way?

Also, does it happen any time of day, e.g also first thing in the morning, or if you have a slight cold?

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I don't want the sound and I also want to know what causes it, especially if it points to bad technique or damage.

It happens on any vowel and even when I'm just humming. I've noticed it at any time, though it's not as prominent first thing in the morning until my voice has been in use for a bit. I haven't had a cold recently so I'm not sure.

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One cause may be lack of lubrication in the vocal folds and larynx.

I am not a vocal coach or instructor, but what I have experienced myself is that lubrication is not the same as hydration, so simply drinking a lot of water may not deal with the situation, and may in some case worsen it. Lubrication requires a proper balance of moisture and minerals. I am not a fan of supplements, so, I personally like to pay attention to everyday diet and watch for what improves or worsen my sound.

Diet is very personal. How much water you need will depend on what you eat, your alcohol intake, whether you smoke, etc. Then you have to make sure that the mineral and sugar intake (especially salt) is balanced with the amount of water, because minerals and sugars are what hold the water in place in the cells. Excessive water can cause the cells to dilute and leak, losing the benefit of the hydration. So, be careful with advice to drink gallons of water every day. A lot of your water  intake could come from fruit and veg already, and how much is needed varies from person to person. If so, you wouldn't want to follow the same advice given to someone who drinks 10 pints of beer a day, and has no fruit or veg. (Personally, I think that current popular advice assumes a pretty bad diet, and is unsuitable for people with a reasonable diet.)

The fry sound may not be acceptable in classical singing, but I do come across it from time to time with some accomplished contemporary singers, although it is not constant (more occasional). However, if it is caused by lack of lubrication, I would imagine that it could cause damage in the very long term, if not attended to. I very much doubt if you have any vocal damage right now, though.

 

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I had a rather discomforting time practicing parts of songs that where notes lower then my speaking voice. The trick I found was do some sirens to stretch the vocals chords up again. Or practice learning songs with high notes together

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