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The range you can sing means nothing. It is the tone that makes the difference. What you sound like when you are singing. For contemporary singing it does not matter too much.

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7 hours ago, MDEW said:

The range you can sing means nothing. It is the tone that makes the difference. What you sound like when you are singing. For contemporary singing it does not matter too much.

The motive of asking it is can i go any higher in my chest voice? Also I have doubt if I have really accessed my mixed voice or was using head voice? 

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17 hours ago, Ansh said:

I'm a Male 17 year old with a range of F#2-A#4(D5 in mixed voice)

 

17 hours ago, Ansh said:

D5 in mixed voice

The entire vocal range is mixed voice. There are 2 groups of muscles in the vocal tract(Basic description to get the idea across). One to thicken the vocal cords and one to stretch the vocal cords. They need to work together. If you can sing F2 to D5 . sing sirens from a comfortable lower note and slide to the d5(mix) and back to starting note. It takes time to balance things out and slide using different "voices" or timbres and different vowels. These are for warm ups and stretching the vocal cords. You pretty much have to train your voice by singing scales or 3 to 4 note melodies starting from the lower range and moving the starting point by 1 step higher. sing these with different vowels or syllables, like the Do,re, Mi or Mi, Mi, Mi.....La, La, La..... Nay, Nay,, Nay....Goo, Goo etc. Vocal exercises sound weird but they really do work if you pay attention while doing them. You will find that some vowels work better between the notes of E4 to A4....Pay attention to the ones that sound better and the ones that are difficult....The idea is to modify the shape of the difficult vowels closer to the shape of the easier vowels. 

Otherwise play with your voice making weird sounds and feel where the difference lies in the vocal tract.

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