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Ansh

Can a male Baritone go past A4

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I'm most probably a male Baritone with range(A#2) D3-A4(C5) with age 17(voice still changing) I can go past A4 upto C5 but I have to strain very much for that which is not good for voice so any tips to reach that notes without using head voice? 

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3 hours ago, kickingtone said:

Why don't you want to use "head voice"? Are you able to reach C5 in "head voice" without straining?

Yeah very easily accessible in head voice but my head voice doesn't sound good 

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2 hours ago, Ansh said:

Yeah very easily accessible in head voice but my head voice doesn't sound good 

Are you supposing that straining with your "chest voice" sounds better, and has more potential?

Most singers would aim to consolidate their "head voice" in this situation.

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7 hours ago, kickingtone said:

Are you supposing that straining with your "chest voice" sounds better, and has more potential?

Most singers would aim to consolidate their "head voice" in this situation.

Actually my head voice sounds very airy which it shouldn't have to

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33 minutes ago, Ansh said:

Actually my head voice sounds very airy which it shouldn't have to

     Bingo. The difference between, Full voiced Head voice and falsetto is having cord closure on the high notes,  resonance Placement and a bit of vocal cord thickness.

     There are two groups of muscles in the Adams apple. TA(Thyroarytneoids) and CT (Cricothyroids). The vocal cords/folds are the TA and are the muscles/folds that do the vibrating. You can make them thicken or thin out.

     When you are angry or being stern with someone you are making them thick. When speaking light and soft like when using baby talk you are thinning them out. Also when using a vowel like Aa as in cat and Ae as in Cake the vocal folds are relatively thick, when using a hooty Hoo like an Owl or Wee like a kid on a swing the folds are relatively thin.

      Just like a guitar or piano the thicker strings vibrate slower and give a lower tone a thinner string vibrates a little faster and gives a higher tone. On a guitar or piano each string is a different thickness and length. You have strings that are thick and made up of a wire with other wires wrapped around it. This wire gives a certain type of sound. After the strings start getting small enough the string is made up of 1 wire without any other wires wrapped around it and it gives a sound different from strings with wrappings.. The TA muscles are made in a way that you can change the thickness and very how much of the Folds are vibrating.

      The CT muscles stretch the vocal folds and are somewhat responsible for changing pitch. When the folds are thick the CT muscles can only stretch the vocal folds to a certain pitch and then it starts getting hard to stretch them any more or to keep them together. When we try to thin out the vocal folds at that point, the TA muscles let go completely and the CT muscles are able to stretch the vocal folds because there is no more resistance by the TA muscles. Because the TA muscle are now thinned out to the maximum they vibrate faster just like the guitar or piano with the string made up of 1 wire and it gives a sound different from the vibration that has some thickness to it.

     The "Trick" if you want to call it that, is to maintain a balance between the thickness of the vocal folds or TA muscles and the stretch of the CT muscles when you are singing. Resonance plays a part in that too. If you are interested in that... then reply to this post. Otherwise it is getting late and I have to stop.

    But in the Mean time sing a Wee in you your speaking voice and siren up in pitch and gradually change to the sound of a Wee made by a kid having fun on a swing. You should be able to make a smooth transition. Pay attention to what happens and what sensations you feel in your face and throat.

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2 hours ago, MDEW said:

     Bingo. The difference between, Full voiced Head voice and falsetto is having cord closure on the high notes,  resonance Placement and a bit of vocal cord thickness.

     There are two groups of muscles in the Adams apple. TA(Thyroarytneoids) and CT (Cricothyroids). The vocal cords/folds are the TA and are the muscles/folds that do the vibrating. You can make them thicken or thin out.

     When you are angry or being stern with someone you are making them thick. When speaking light and soft like when using baby talk you are thinning them out. Also when using a vowel like Aa as in cat and Ae as in Cake the vocal folds are relatively thick, when using a hooty Hoo like an Owl or Wee like a kid on a swing the folds are relatively thin.

      Just like a guitar or piano the thicker strings vibrate slower and give a lower tone a thinner string vibrates a little faster and gives a higher tone. On a guitar or piano each string is a different thickness and length. You have strings that are thick and made up of a wire with other wires wrapped around it. This wire gives a certain type of sound. After the strings start getting small enough the string is made up of 1 wire without any other wires wrapped around it and it gives a sound different from strings with wrappings.. The TA muscles are made in a way that you can change the thickness and very how much of the Folds are vibrating.

      The CT muscles stretch the vocal folds and are somewhat responsible for changing pitch. When the folds are thick the CT muscles can only stretch the vocal folds to a certain pitch and then it starts getting hard to stretch them any more or to keep them together. When we try to thin out the vocal folds at that point, the TA muscles let go completely and the CT muscles are able to stretch the vocal folds because there is no more resistance by the TA muscles. Because the TA muscle are now thinned out to the maximum they vibrate faster just like the guitar or piano with the string made up of 1 wire and it gives a sound different from the vibration that has some thickness to it.

     The "Trick" if you want to call it that, is to maintain a balance between the thickness of the vocal folds or TA muscles and the stretch of the CT muscles when you are singing. Resonance plays a part in that too. If you are interested in that... then reply to this post. Otherwise it is getting late and I have to stop.

    But in the Mean time sing a Wee in you your speaking voice and siren up in pitch and gradually change to the sound of a Wee made by a kid having fun on a swing. You should be able to make a smooth transition. Pay attention to what happens and what sensations you feel in your face and throat.

Actually I just sang a B4 in head voice or mixed or so I'm confused it was strong but not as strong as in chest voice also not AIRY and I'm interested in trick

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2 hours ago, Ansh said:

Actually I just sang a B4 in head voice or mixed or so I'm confused it was strong but not as strong as in chest voice also not AIRY and I'm interested in trick

"Mixed" is full voice.  You just did the "Trick".  You can make the mix "Lighter or Heavier", Thinner or Thicker" "Weaker and stronger". But you have to play around with the voice to find it.  The other part is resonance. The higher the larynx the "Thinner" the sound. Lowering the larynx gives a "Thicker" or fuller sound. Vowels are "Throat shapes" you can use them to  change the resonance too.

Practice that "Mix" with other vowels and pay attention to what happens with the voice. Sing scales by starting in the low range and gradually change to the "Mix" with all the vowels. Learning how to control it takes time.

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4 hours ago, Ansh said:

Actually I just sang a B4 in head voice or mixed or so I'm confused it was strong but not as strong as in chest voice also not AIRY and I'm interested in trick

I think you've just answered the question of the thread.

It's not about the label, "baritone", or the label prohibiting or gifting you a particular ability.

Male singers of all descriptions have to work at, and refine, those higher notes to make them increasingly richer. It is not like having either brown eyes or blue eyes.

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On 12/25/2019 at 8:56 PM, kickingtone said:

I think you've just answered the question of the thread.

It's not about the label, "baritone", or the label prohibiting or gifting you a particular ability.

Male singers of all descriptions have to work at, and refine, those higher notes to make them increasingly richer. It is not like having either brown eyes or blue eyes.

https://voca.ro/gMLoxhayf4H this is high note of you and I I have tried in both chest and head(or falsetto?) 

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On 12/25/2019 at 7:48 PM, MDEW said:

"Mixed" is full voice.  You just did the "Trick".  You can make the mix "Lighter or Heavier", Thinner or Thicker" "Weaker and stronger". But you have to play around with the voice to find it.  The other part is resonance. The higher the larynx the "Thinner" the sound. Lowering the larynx gives a "Thicker" or fuller sound. Vowels are "Throat shapes" you can use them to  change the resonance too.

Practice that "Mix" with other vowels and pay attention to what happens with the voice. Sing scales by starting in the low range and gradually change to the "Mix" with all the vowels. Learning how to control it takes time.

Sir you can say it is mix or falsetto https://voca.ro/gMLoxhayf4H

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4 minutes ago, MDEW said:

No Falsetto there. You can hear the vocal folds vibrating. Even in the highest part.

What does that mean? Heady mix or chesty mix

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It does not matter. What matters is that the low notes sound consistent with the high notes.They all sound like they are coming from the same person and it sounds "Good".

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14 minutes ago, MDEW said:

It does not matter. What matters is that the low notes sound consistent with the high notes.They all sound like they are coming from the same person and it sounds "Good".

Cause I thought high notes sounded strained especially that F5 and A#4 were not supported

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48 minutes ago, Ansh said:

Cause I thought high notes sounded strained especially that F5 and A#4 were not supported

Of course they sounded strained. Those are areas where it is difficult and there is a passage. If It was '"falsetto" or "Heady Mix" they would have been easier but would also sound "disconnected" That is why I said there was NO Falsetto in there.

The more you practice and notice where to "Shift" it will get easier. Also knowing that you did it at least once and it sounded good, you can now relax and stop "Trying" to do it. "Trying" gives us a mental block that makes it more difficult.

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31 minutes ago, MDEW said:

Of course they sounded strained. Those are areas where it is difficult and there is a passage. If It was '"falsetto" or "Heady Mix" they would have been easier but would also sound "disconnected" That is why I said there was NO Falsetto in there.

The more you practice and notice where to "Shift" it will get easier. Also knowing that you did it at least once and it sounded good, you can now relax and stop "Trying" to do it. "Trying" gives us a mental block that makes it more difficult.

How can I release the strain though

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