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Modern Technique in Musical Theater

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Rozzy73
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I'm no expert on this, for sure. I come from a classical background and spend a long time trying to learn to sing rock and blues on my own. I've recently gotten back into the theater in a rock opera (Rent) and discovered a whole new world of singing technique. I'm currently working with Kevin Richard's "Breaking the Chains" and prior to that, I spent a lot of time with Roger Love's Set Your Voice Free.

I would love to get any feedback from people trained in these techniques who are involved with theater. Ive been to two voice coaches in Boston and I've heard stories about those in NYC. They are mostly "You got what god gave you" kind of people." Clearly some of us need to find new resources if we want to expand the capability of our instrument. I would love to hear from people having similar experiences.

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I've seen some of Kevin's videos on youtube and he is the reason I found out about this forum. And I have read Love's book "Set your voice free." With Kevin, you will learn to sing rock and will help you expand your range. With Roger Love, you will develope that theater voice, the one that projects and cuts through everything. They're both good systems to learn from.

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Hi Rozzy73, I totally recommend Singing and the actor by Gillyanne Kayes. It is a great book on vocal technique and musical theatre and it's based pretty much on the Estill technique. You can get it on Amazon. I'm not a musical theatre singer but still loved the book and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in that wonderful genre!

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Hi Rozzy73, I totally recommend Singing and the actor by Gillyanne Kayes. It is a great book on vocal technique and musical theatre and it's based pretty much on the Estill technique. You can get it on Amazon. I'm not a musical theatre singer but still loved the book and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in that wonderful genre!

blackstar, i had contemplated buying that one. please tell me what percentage of it is vocal instruction?

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Hi Bob, the book is divided in three sections, and the first two are vocal technique solely. The last section deals with performance as well as techniques applied to songs. Even if you're not a musical theatre singer, the third section is extremely useful, because it guides you through preparing songs, working on the text and its meaning and vocal qualities, which is also vocal technique. Vocal qualities in Estill are the "ingredients" for the recipe, like speech, falsetto, cry, twang, belting, etc. So even when the third is not purely technical as the first two, it's useful for all singers. I highly recommend this book, my second favorite after CVT :) Let me know if you want me to be more specific on the contents!

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Hi Bob, the book is divided in three sections, and the first two are vocal technique solely. The last section deals with performance as well as techniques applied to songs. Even if you're not a musical theatre singer, the third section is extremely useful, because it guides you through preparing songs, working on the text and its meaning and vocal qualities, which is also vocal technique. Vocal qualities in Estill are the "ingredients" for the recipe, like speech, falsetto, cry, twang, belting, etc. So even when the third is not purely technical as the first two, it's useful for all singers. I highly recommend this book, my second favorite after CVT :) Let me know if you want me to be more specific on the contents!

thanks so much....i'm gonna grab that one.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks. I'll look into that book, for sure.

Working with these books and CD's had helped me so much. I only wish I had discovered this stuff earlier. In a particularly satisfying moment, a fellow cast member complimented my on my ability to switch between singing smooth/sweet and bright/edgy. That's a new thing for me, and it's really useful as an actor.

I think my music director and a few other cast members were a little shocked when he was playing "Pinball Wizard" before rehearsal. I jumped in and ripped it, complete with a rock scream on "sure plays" then curbing down to chest. Five months ago, I was pushing for E4.

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