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problem transitioning chest to head. help!

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darkclaw3000
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Hey guys, for awhile now I realized when singing or doing some scales and vocal exercises, i tend to stay in chest, and pull more instead of going to head. in KTVA, ken says to pull a little before going to head voice. but the problem im having is, how much is that 'a little'.

now i feel like its gonna be a habit to pull more then i have too, like how i've been singing recently, its quite tiring.

where exactly do i do the transition? sometimes i even pull so high i donno if im doing it right anymore.

thx guys!

aLiz

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In my opinion, if your voice doesn't sound connected from bottom to top, start bridging earlier. Just experiment with it. Steven could give you a very accurate answer based on vowels, volume and shoe size but this is summing it up.

jonpall, darkclaw3000: For the larger shoe sized, early bridging can be helped by using /i/ and /u/ (EE and OO) vowels in sirens, initally. For those endowed with size 11 and 12, the transition can be felt as low as Ab3 or Bb3, both of which are just below middle C.

Can I laugh now? This was a hoot.

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A siren is exactly that, a siren. Like the police, the ambulances, etc.. It is basically an ascending or descending sound that is regular and continuous. A bit like if your were connecting every note in a regular scale without stopping on any of them, as demonstrated by Mr Lunte here :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8zroG9QWNc

I think he uses some kind of Eh, here, but you can do it with whatever vowel pleases you. And since it's related to the problem discussed here... ;)

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A siren is exactly that, a siren. Like the police, the ambulances, etc.. It is basically an ascending or descending sound that is regular and continuous. A bit like if your were connecting every note in a regular scale without stopping on any of them, as demonstrated by Mr Lunte here :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8zroG9QWNc

I think he uses some kind of Eh, here, but you can do it with whatever vowel pleases you. And since it's related to the problem discussed here... ;)

i find that i do better when i increase support and resonance rather than pulling back on the respiratory velocity. i guess it can vary by individual.

i think that whole passagio transition intimidates a lot of folks just trying it for the first time..it did me....don't allow it to.

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Hey guys, for awhile now I realized when singing or doing some scales and vocal exercises, i tend to stay in chest, and pull more instead of going to head. in KTVA, ken says to pull a little before going to head voice. but the problem im having is, how much is that 'a little'.

now i feel like its gonna be a habit to pull more then i have too, like how i've been singing recently, its quite tiring.

where exactly do i do the transition? sometimes i even pull so high i donno if im doing it right anymore.

thx guys!

aLiz

oh man, this always get me going! as long as you're not straining and constricting (staying relaxed as possible in the jaw and tongue) there is nothing wrong with pulling more or reaching more for higher notes....is it harder? yes, is it more physically demanding? yes, and it takes more support, and you will get fatigue, but i believe you want to do this because you're (over time) teaching and strenthening the folds (and related musculature) to adduct up in those higher notes. if you default to head as soon as the going gets tough, how are you going to build the strength and coordination for those chesty sounding highs?

it's a bitch up in those notes this way, but if you stick at it... you will get them.

steve, please what do you say on this?

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thx Ronron for the vid! that was really helpful. now im set on gettin fourpillars asap.

videohere - you got a point about getting those chesty highs. guess i have to keep doing it.. would love to hear what steve have to say! =D

Bob, darkclaw3000: You guys already know what I am going to say, I am sure. Consistency of tone quality, 'chesty' or otherwise, comes from consistency of vocal function. Specifically, when on an upward note pattern, or siren, which transitions the male voice range from A3 (below mid C) to A4 (above mid C,) somewhere in there the vocalist has to let the vocal bands thin somewhat, or the voice will 'top out' somewhere around E4-F#4

In larger male voices, this is more challenging because of strength. The natural habit is to try to continue to use thick-fold, and that is helped by the particular vowels available in the middle-c to F above range. It feels great to oversing these, which you can think of as thick fold with lots of exhalation force.

Now, the 'lift up and back' thought that Robert uses is a reminder to not oversing, but rather to take the pressure off so that the muscles are free to make the necessary adjustment, an adjustment that, while to the singer it feels quite different, is less obvious to the listener. Phonation stays fairly consistent, and with the pressure off, the fundamental is free to rise in to higher notes, and what results is a little different laryngeal configuration, one that is appropriate for the upper range.

Summing this all up then... to maintain a 'chesty' tone going into the top voice, the singer makes an adjustment, but one that is less obvious to the hearing of the listener than it is in the sensations of the singer. If thought of as technique, what the singer does is to reduce the exhalation force and simultaneously increase resonance, so that the overall effect is good, and the voice is free to make its necessary adjustments to transition to the higher notes.

I hope this helps.

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thanks steve..., steve, this lighter/heavier "choice"/methodology is one of the most confusing aspects of singing...can you see why i say this?

Sure, Bob. Its counterintuitive, on top of being inside you. This makes understanding what is going on problematic.

However, there are comparisons that can be made to other physical systems that can help get over this hurdle. Imagine your voice as if it was a car, and the act of singing is moving somewhere. Here's how the comparison can be made (if you free your mind):

You have 4 vital parts: 1) A mind that wants to do something, 2) An engine, that supplies force in response to the request of the mind. 3) a transmission that communicates the engine force to the driving wheels (front, back or both). 4) the wheel/tire which work together to transfer the force to the pavement.

In this comparison, what is going on at the level of the larynx is most like a transmission, in that there are different kinds of transmissions that have multiple gears, or none at all. For our purposes, a 'gear' is a laryngeal configuration.

Now, for the full range of speeds (notes) to be possible, a manual transmission is configured so that it can operated in one or another gear that is matched with a certain RPM level on the engine. Just like the voice, the car with the manual transmission cannot use the same gear at low speeds as it does at high. If too high a gear for the engine speed, a stall happens. If too low a gear for the engine speed, the engine revs up and works too hard.

The driver of this car learns how to adjust the engine speed and shift gears so that accelleration is smooth, and that all speeds, from the slowest to the fastest, are connected evenly together, without stripping any gears. The clutch work, which controlls the timing of the shifting, also takes the force off of the transmission, so that the shifts can be made without upsetting the riders.

While this simple model works as a starting point, for the singer, a more apt parallel would be as an automatic transmission, with very smooth internal shifters, and many so many intermediate gears that the engine speed and tranny ratios are always perfectly matched. For such a car/voice, there are no 'shift points', just smooth, continuously coordinated power and gearing. However, for the singer that 'puts the pedal to the metal', the car responds to the intent... and revs up. In certain speed ranges, that can work for a while, but if sustained, the transmission must eventually adjust to take the pressure off... upshifting back into a ratio that can be sustained.

That is the art of vocal registration... to match the muscle actions in the voice box with the amount of exhalation force being applied. There are multiple combinations that can be made to work, but adjustment must be made at some point or the vocal car will stall, or overrev.

Oh, and if you care about what part the wheels and tires play in the metaphor... that's resonance... how the power from the transmission makes it to the outside world to 'move' the audience (LOL).

I hope this helps.

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steve, it does yes, i see the analogy. using the same analogy of the car, if i go into head voice (shift gears) too soon, i feel like a manual tranny that shifted to 4th gear or high gear between 25-30 mph ( too soon as you know ) rather than 40-45 mph then the engine labors, especially when i give it more gas. i've driven nothing but sticks all my life....lol!!! no overdrive in this tranny (lol)!!

see where i'm coming from?

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