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At What Point Do You Keep Quiet

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So been singing a lot this past week and also working with Ken Tamplin's stuff. My voice seems to be getting pretty tired and I've got a show tomorrow.

At what point of vocal fatigue is it best to just not do ANYTHING? Not vocalize, not talk, not anything?

To get the chord swelling down, I've always done VERY light eeeeeeeees.

Any other suggestions?

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So been singing a lot this past week and also working with Ken Tamplin's stuff. My voice seems to be getting pretty tired and I've got a show tomorrow.

At what point of vocal fatigue is it best to just not do ANYTHING? Not vocalize, not talk, not anything?

To get the chord swelling down, I've always done VERY light eeeeeeeees.

Any other suggestions?

billy, i always like to warm down with lip bubbles, light falsetto slides, and some gentle humming.

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It depends on who you ask and what day it is. From an athletic standpoint, as far as muscle fatigue goes, professional athletes rest the day before a competition. One singer I read of, would go ahead and vocalize lightly, even after his voice was strained to keep the coordination going. Many professional singers don't spend hours warming up. On average, they warm up 30 to 40 minutes and never right before show time. They give it a rest anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour before showtime. Some, like Geoff Tate, warm up just a little during the day, never extensive. Some, like Ronnie James Dio, hardly warmed up at all, saving his strength and endurance for the show. Ron Keel learned this from him. Dickinson does nothing for most of the day. About an hour before show time, he will hum to himself to work on his resonance.

But believe it or not, Roger Love aside, you do have to give the voice a rest. I know I will catch some crap for that. Roger Love is the one who said the voice is actually built to phonate 24 hours a day. It's in his book, "Set Your Voice Free." Those that want to give me crap about that are welcome to read his book. I disagree a little bit with that. Muscle and tissue are muscle and tissue and they need time to rest and re-build.

I've already surmised before that you are overworking yourself. But, evidently, you can't or won't stop. So, eventually, you'll get rest, after a while, whether you are ready or not.

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This is how I do :

Burning feeling/loss of range/breaks all over the place/pain/airy voice/lump in the throat or itching when I speak or sing -> Try to keep silent a week.

fatigue/slight discomfort -> Stop what I was doing, increase support, stay away from distortion and falsetto, don't do difficult songs, be very wary of the ^-- bad signs, decrease speaking to a minimum and do so with a resonant voice (that's the time when you change you speaking volume to medium-ish), stop whispering at all cost.

And I think light eeees help the voice recover faster.

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You should have no swelling of the vocal folds, if you do, your doing something wrong with your training or "techniques". There is a difference from "tired" vs "fatigued". Tired means, your voice will respond fine the next day and you have been singing with it for about 10 hours, no problem... fatigued means issues dont go away that easy, they linger... which again, means that your doing something wrong.

My understanding is that KT teaches to bridge as late as possible? In other words, pull chest and flirt with constriction before bridging? I dont know if this is true, and perhaps someone mis-understood what Ken was advocating, but keep this in mind... I would never advocate bridging late, that would fatigue your voice. You MUST train to bridge EARLY!

Also, I would not advise working on light "ees". "EEs" are closed vowels, as such, are prone to constriction very easy. Why do "ees" when you can work with open vowels that actually are friendly to your voice?

I would advise that you drink warm mint tea and definately stay off your voice for about a week if you have serious fatigue. I would also take a look at the timing of your bridging. Its likely that your bridging late and singing in shallow placements, or not getting deep enough into the head voice to disengage the constrictors.

The best tea for singing is here: www.vishuddaforsingers.com

I wish you the best ...

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Thanks-

It's never a 'burning' kind of thing, or 'painful'. It's mostly that I seem to get more phlegm and that RIGHT at the bridge between chest and falsetto, it can "air out"- does that make sense? Especially at lower volumes. I can push it and get through that section, but then it compounds the problem. If it's the top-end of my range that all the sudden has a ton of distortion- then that usually means that I need a day or two off.

On the KT stuff (for Robert) yeah, he does mention to bridge higher. To be quite honest, I'm having a tough time going from chest to falsetto anyway. My head voice seems to work great, it's just that transistion point. It's about 3 notes that give me the problem crossing over without the yodel, then I can go up to a double hi C in head.

The phlegm thing seems to be a real constant for me. When it's in my chest or on my chords, I can have problems that seem like distortion- but if it gets loosened and blows off (gross, sorry) my voice is fine. But sometimes I can't tell the phlegm is there until it moves and then I'm fine. Last night I tried Mucinex DM- Holy Crap, I was ready for Woodstock! The regular stuff seems to help me keep clear.

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I also had this problem when i was training with Ken tamplin's dvds. I stopped working with it because everytime it tires my voice. It didn't work for me, but bridging earlier like Rob tought me was way better for me, i started from that point and tried to put some "weight" (it more twang in fact).

I think that Ken tamplin's method is for singers that have really good skills, even the first dvd.

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analog, sometimes I can, some times I can't. Joshual, It's not necessarily due to Ken's stuff, and I don't want to put that out there that I'm saying that- It's just, I'm doing a heckuva lotta singing lately (gigs, rehearsals) Plus trying to do Ken's stuff each day.

I actually choked down some Mucinex DM day before yesterday. While it made me feel like I was at Woodstock, it helped to clear a lot of the junk in my chest and chords (that I didn't realize was in there) and last night I sang really well with minimal effort. Maybe I've got some kind of allergy that I'm not aware of or something that's getting in the way.

I've heard forever "if you're doing it right, you'll be able to sing every night". I don't think I believe that anymore. Most major singers out there cannot do 2 hour shows every single night. Most of them cannot. They have to have a night off (usually after 2 or 3 nights). Or, they're tracking their vocals. Case in point right here- Celine Dion:

Parts are recorded, parts are not...

I'm doing gigs that are 4 hours a night twice a week, then rehearsing two times a week for at least 3 hours a night... As Ron said in another post, I may just be over working myself. That's why the whole "you should be able to sing every night without trouble thing" just doesn't seem to stand up for me. It makes me want to just quit trying to "Chase the Grail", which for me is "singing every night without trouble or vocal fatigue".

But I'm off the point, sorry- Basically, vocal rest- when do you do this and for how long do you lay off?

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Well, that is the hard question, Billy. Considering two shows a week, two rehearsals a week, plus working on a singing program. So, you're singing about 4 nights a week. Plus, singing programs probably during those days and nights off. If all else fails and the schedule permits, give at least a few hours rest before show time. And make the warm-ups and exercises at an easy strength during the show nights and save the harder exercises for the days off. But I would say that you need some time off, here and there.

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I'm doing gigs that are 4 hours a night twice a week, then rehearsing two times a week for at least 3 hours a night... As Ron said in another post, I may just be over working myself. That's why the whole "you should be able to sing every night without trouble thing" just doesn't seem to stand up for me. It makes me want to just quit trying to "Chase the Grail", which for me is "singing every night without trouble or vocal fatigue".

But I'm off the point, sorry- Basically, vocal rest- when do you do this and for how long do you lay off?

Billy Budapest: While everyone finds the answer for their own voice, I think its fair to say that vocal rest is something that you build right into your lifestyle, including the times when you are singing... into each song, into each set, into each concert, into each tour.

And, rest does not necessarily mean silence. It could be inclusion of a less-intense (like, a non- 'face peeling' ) song in a set, with perhaps shorter phrases or some additional instrumentals, which allows you to re-group after a serious wail, and also to extend the emotional range of your audience engagement. Varying the range and tessitura of songs in a set can give the top a rest.

Strenuous, lengthy singing on a day shows up in the tissues the next day. Every singer is challenged to find how much is the right amount to support their performance schedule. For example, in the world of Opera, contracts are written so that on the morning after a full performance, a singer will not have a rehearsal before 10 am, basically 11 or 12 hours of R&R. Very few lead performers will do 2 nights in a row, or even 2 performances in 3 days. Its far more common for a performing schedule like 2 or 3 performances over a 10-day period.

The club singer or touring rocker has a different challenge, but also some help... more gigs, but available amplification. If the tour is 5 shows in 7 days, then the singer has to know the limitations of his instrument, and work within those limits. How much silence is enough to recover from the singing you do? You have to figure that out for yourself. How much sleep is enough? Same answer.

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