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get to the folds!

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hi folks,

i guess i get off on writing new posts and although i'm no expert, i come up with these deductions that i want to share with you in street language because i feel it can help...or we can discuss it and all share our perspectives.

here's a big one....i call it "get to the folds"...make a beeline to the folds!

i have found one of the biggest successes you can have is when you've gotten to the point where the vocal folds are so unemcumbered by any constrictors that they are free to do their primary job, make pitch changes. you can almost feel like your flicking or brushstroking the folds for pitch change.....especially felt on vowels like "ah," "ee,"

and "oh."

the folds feel like they're in your soft palette rather than in your larynx, your larynx feels absent from your throat. your soft palatte feels tall and feels like it's tapers to a point at the top. (actually, your hard palatte can also feel that way too.)

i can't be the only one feeling these sensations, but when you hit a note and get this ring, this pinging sound, the pitch is virtually guaranteed to be spot on too. you get this release..oh, it's awesome!

i urge you to seek out and discover for yourselves this sensation....this ring...believe that this ring and ping is now mandatory.

here's what appears to be the requisites for this to happen, at least for me:

the neck is relaxed and slightly elongated towards the back, not jutting forward.

the tongue is relaxed, tip where it has to be

the mouth is shaped into a yawn or apple-biting shape (so important for me)

the larynx is neutral or can be slightly lowered

the knees are slightly bent

the pelvis and butt cheeks slightly tensed inward

you focus the tone into the soft palette, as if any lower is impossible

breath bupport is mandatory.

biggest thing:

you have to experiment per your individual voice to sing a vowel and shape or try different shades of each vowel till it causes the ring to happen. make take a while or the result will be fleeting at first (frustrating might be a better word...lol!!!) it takes time

to get it.

i urge you once again to try for this sound, this ringing, pinging, sound. you will be thrilled with what happens to your voice and your singing. you'll feel like there is no passagio, no break in your voice.

i know nothing about cvt, but i know this sound, and i slowly keep getting better and better at producing it with more consistency.

lou gramm has it down to a science. he knows all too well how to pick the vowel shade best for his voice.

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Bob, all of this is very much in line with what Jamie Vendera teaches in the book "Raise your voice". And that ring/ping is very likely what people here are referring to as twang. Jamie also talks about focusing your sound in the soft palate. That and breath support are the two things he considers to be most important for singing technique.

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I often rock back and forth between liking CVT and Raise your voice (RYV). What I like about RYV is that it has so few principles. It's really only one - finding that magic soft palate to resonate notes from and you'll be a vocal god. Well, almost :)

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Bob, all of this is very much in line with what Jamie Vendera teaches in the book "Raise your voice". And that ring/ping is very likely what people here are referring to as twang. Jamie also talks about focusing your sound in the soft palate. That and breath support are the two things he considers to be most important for singing technique.

nu,nu,nu,nu, noooo....the ring, ping, i mean is not twang although twang may assist it. it's i think what cvt calls "in the center of a vowel" or maybe "center of a mode?"

it's a vowel shading that maximizes resonance and frees the voice to produce it with considerably less effort.

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See, terminology is getting us again :) . Now I get you. To generalize even further, yeah you want to shape the muscles inside your throat in such a way that you get the sound you desire. And then breath support will "support" that sound, i.e. making it possible for you to sing like that for a long time.

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See, terminology is getting us again :) . Now I get you. To generalize even further, yeah you want to shape the muscles inside your throat in such a way that you get the sound you desire. And then breath support will "support" that sound, i.e. making it possible for you to sing like that for a long time.

shape the muscles inside the throat?...hymm, not quite....sing very subtle vowel shades per your individual voice and experiment by trial and error till you arrive at the exact shade to kick in those formants... easier said than done though.

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Right, that's what I said. That's done by shaping your muscles in a certain way. To be even more precise, contract a given set of muscles with a give amount of force and release other muscles, but now I'm being almost TOO abstract. Again, terminology :)

You could also word it like this: Move "stuff" inside your mouth until you suddenly feel this increased resonance, ring, and release of tension.

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Right, that's what I said. That's done by shaping your muscles in a certain way. To be even more precise, contract a given set of muscles with a give amount of force and release other muscles, but now I'm being almost TOO abstract. Again, terminology :)

You could also word it like this: Move "stuff" inside your mouth until you suddenly feel this increased resonance, ring, and release of tension.

yes, the latter is exactly what i mean... but do people do it, or know to do it if it's not instinctive...i was trying to get them to sense l the significance of it.

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What would you guys say are the pros and cons of inward versus outward flexing of the rear end in relation to vowel shaping?

this guy is one of the most articulate teachers i've ever found on the web. i love the way he explains things. joy sikorski is another one.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/user/voicewisdom#p/u/3/wr7Gdf0Ug9s

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I notice when I set up according to your imagery, my neck problem that I was complaining about is much less apparent, especially "focusing the tone" in the soft palate, at the top and back of the mouth. I've always had a tendency to think forward but I think thinking directions is counter-intuitive since the voice can't be directed, but it can be allowed if the shaping of the vocal tract opens access to various resonating configurations.

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