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chest and head voice

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NCdan
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I'm curious as to whether it is possible for there to be no discernable difference in tone between chest voice and head voice. I recently did a song in A, which required me to jump quickly back and forth between chest and head quite a bit, and switching between them just doesn't seem to flow well. Sure, I can hit the notes, but they just sound too different. With training can I make my head sound more like my chest (or maybe the other way around?)

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I'm curious as to whether it is possible for there to be no discernable difference in tone between chest voice and head voice. I recently did a song in A, which required me to jump quickly back and forth between chest and head quite a bit, and switching between them just doesn't seem to flow well. Sure, I can hit the notes, but they just sound too different. With training can I make my head sound more like my chest (or maybe the other way around?)

Generally speaking, yes. And this is part of Lunte's methodology, by bridging early. Having head voice tones that go relatively low to where your break in tone is allows you to transition to that before the break and then the tone is continuous going up or down. That is a case of making the chest voice become similar to head voice so that it all sounds like chest voice, your chest voice. The audience won't know the difference.

Coming from the opposite direction (by way of mental visualization and language) is Roger Love and "Set your voice Free" where he helps people find middle voice and, within his own book, does not set a lot of time aside for head voice. Primarily because most pop songs are pitched in what he calls middle voice, which would actually cover the area of high chest voice into low and middle head voice. Which sounds like a lot of regions to cover. Lunte's program is actually simpler. Get into low head voice before your breaks. In the words of Geoff Tate, "I don't even go there." That is, Tate will either bridge low or the melody is structured to avoid the break, i.e., rumbling chest notes for verses and piercing head tones for the chorus. Bruce Dickinson did this for "Run to the Hills." You have this rattled high baritone for the verses ("galloping hard on the plains") and this choir-boy clean attack on "run to the hills, run for your life ...")

Also, the break can be different for different vowel formations. So, if a spot is giving you trouble in the transition, try another vowel or a word with a different vowel. It's your song to sing, regardless of who wrote it.

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NCdan - for sure you can get your head very close in sound to your chest. I'm using the standard bel canto technique in which you do vowel modifications in chest in the Passagio range. I break into head around A4 or B4. I can certainly feel the difference between head and chest, but when I listen back to a recording of myself it is pretty hard to tell the difference. To me it is the passagio inbetween chest and head that makes a nice gradual transition. In CVT terms the bel canto passagio is the same as curbing. There are specific vowels used to transition chest to passagio and passagio to head that make the transition nearly seamless. The CVT book explains these transition vowels, so does a good bel canto instructor. It isn't easy - it takes practice and training (the right kind of training), but it CAN be done - and everyone has the capability of doing it.

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