Jump to content

finished cvt book

Rate this topic


VideoHere
 Share

Recommended Posts

folks, i just wrapped up reading the cvt book. it's an excellent source of information. there were some really great pockets of advice and knowledge.... a definite recommended read. i'm sure the audio files would have helped, but my book didn't come with them.

while you know me to respect everyone's opinion, for me the "modes" approach just doesn't work for me. i prefer more of a trial and error methodology. thanks for those who recommended it to me. i did learn a lot.

bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As you speak, you sing.. si parla si canta.. it's an old expression, but the reason it's remembered hundreds of years later is because the voice hasn't changed in a very long time.

Bob, I do have few questions about CVT.... in cvt.. how much time do they focus on the speaking voice? How much time do they focus on the proper way to speak, and how it relates to diction? How much do they make the connection between a free, supported speaking voice, and the sung tone?

to the best of my knowledge just a little bit. the book i'm reading now is "voice of the mind." i'm really into this one.

ken tamplin must have read this one. it goes into detail about the "ah" to "oh" to "oo" transition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Therein lies the problems with these programs. smh

see, you're jumping to the gun russ. there are other books/programs that have. you have to read several to get different perspectives or read overlap. it just helps broaden your knowledge that's all.

for example, in "voice of the mind" they describe the actual acoustical science to vowel modification helping it to really sink in and how the higher the voice ascends in pitch the more the sound beam needs to drop behind or back slightly in order to make room for the beams greater length...

ken tamplin shows you exactly how it's done...how to navigate the passagio through vowel mods. you get different explanations...in some ways it's like having multiple instructors working for ya...lol!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't you guys who have Ken's program think that his vowel modifications are a bit weird and that he strains a bit in the exercises? I've heard the audio files just once so I can't really judge it, but it would be cool to hear someone comment on this. Ken is a great rock singer, but I found this aspect of his program a bit weird. But again, I've only had a glimpse of it so I can't really judge it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't you guys who have Ken's program think that his vowel modifications are a bit weird and that he strains a bit in the exercises? I've heard the audio files just once so I can't really judge it, but it would be cool to hear someone comment on this. Ken is a great rock singer, but I found this aspect of his program a bit weird. But again, I've only had a glimpse of it so I can't really judge it.

i only have #1, but if you follow the dvd and do exactly what he says, you'll wonder where the passagio went.

this "ah" to "oh" to "oo" thing he teaches (now that i am reading herbert-caesari's "voice of the mind") is an acoustic reality. it allows the voice to transcend effortlessly through the passagio but when the "oo" kicks in it can sound a little strange if you push into it or overdo it.

it was pricey, but it was very good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't you guys who have Ken's program think that his vowel modifications are a bit weird and that he strains a bit in the exercises? I've heard the audio files just once so I can't really judge it, but it would be cool to hear someone comment on this. Ken is a great rock singer, but I found this aspect of his program a bit weird. But again, I've only had a glimpse of it so I can't really judge it.

I own all of the stages and it does sound strained. I think that Ken encourages pulling chest up as high as possible before going into head voice, so it sounds strained during the exercises.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

exactly! just like lugo...cain, and others....i don't like the term "pulling chest" when you are exercising. it has a negative connotation.

how about this way to explain it.....when you're exercising, as you ascend in pitch you make a strong effort to keep the folds adducted. no break into falsetto unless you can't hold it together. yes, not to strain too much.... to quote lugo "if you have to break into falsetto that's okay for now, but each time you do it, you want to get try a little harder to get a little more connected (fold adduction). you want to bring chest up a little and bring head down a little."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On stage 3 - there are certain areas where it does sound a little strange - in the passagio at higher volume. Then he backs it down to light singing in the same area and it completely goes away. It is only certain times during loud singing. It is strange, but I've made so much progress with his method that I'll give him some leeway. When I sing along with those same exact parts, I'm doing the vowel mods the same way he prescribes but I don't feel or sound strained. The only thing I can think of is that he may have been overdoing it the day he was making the recordings. He NEVER sounds like that on any of his actual performances.

He does make fun of himself at one point saying that he sounds like a "dying cat" or something. Then he backs down the volume and has us alternate between singing "hard" and "soft". And says that during a warmup it is not so good to sing at full volume the whole time. This was really helpful for me as that's when I started to work on lighter registration in the passagio.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On stage 3 - there are certain areas where it does sound a little strange - in the passagio at higher volume. Then he backs it down to light singing in the same area and it completely goes away. It is only certain times during loud singing. It is strange, but I've made so much progress with his method that I'll give him some leeway. When I sing along with those same exact parts, I'm doing the vowel mods the same way he prescribes but I don't feel or sound strained. The only thing I can think of is that he may have been overdoing it the day he was making the recordings. He NEVER sounds like that on any of his actual performances.

He does make fun of himself at one point saying that he sounds like a "dying cat" or something. Then he backs down the volume and has us alternate between singing "hard" and "soft". And says that during a warmup it is not so good to sing at full volume the whole time. This was really helpful for me as that's when I started to work on lighter registration in the passagio.

geno, i can't agree more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can "pull chest" (or take overdrive high up or whatever you want to call it) but still don't sound strained, and Ken sounded a bit strained at points. But Geno said it best in his last post - that was a very good one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...