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Choosing a vocal coach: SingingSuccess, TVS, Ken Tamplin

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Flam
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I have a narrow budget of a few hundred dollars, and I'd like to spend it on vocal lessons. But choosing a coach is hard... they all seem to have something unique about them, but also something that I don't really like about them. So I was wondering... since the 3 techniques I've mentionned in the title are all supposed to be a technique that unlocks your voice, and not "style training", which one is really better in quality? I've mostly directing this question to singers who have taken lessons from more than just one of these coaches... So say, you've taken lessons from Ken, and then Lunte. What did you prefer, and why? Or maybe you took lessons with Brett Manning, then Ken, then Lunte, what do you think? I know they're all great coaches, but I'm sure there's a difference somewhere. Because of their rates, mostly. I mean, the cheapest SingingSuccess associate charges 100$/50mins for Skype, Lunte charges 60-80$/hr, Ken charges 190$/hr. I know factors such as marketing makes a difference, but... this much of a difference? I don't think so. Actually, I think TVS is more marketed than Ken Tamplin...

So, opinions please? Thanks!

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just pick one and get your feet wet....lol!!!! they really are all very good.

after you pick one, see how you got along.. the chemistry...see how you work with each other..you need to be very comfortable with the person...the only suggestion i would make is pick the same sex...i find this helps with grasping their singing/demo examples.

now let's say it wasn't a good fit (on either side) move on to the next..there's no saying you have to stay with one teacher.

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What exactly do you mean by "grasping their demo"? One of the reasons why I have so much trouble finding a coach is because none of those reputated coaches sing the style I wanna sing.

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As Bob (VIDEOHERE) said it depends a lot on chemistry. What for me works, for someone else doesn’t work.

IMO TVS is a good choice, particularly the new version 2.0 which I received a few days ago. A lot of content and specially focusing on the weakest part of the singing voice – the passagio from chest to head voice… and other interesting stuff like distortion.... With 2-3 additional Skype lessons you should be ready to start your journey and perhaps after 3-6 months re-evaluate (1-2 Skype lessons), if you are on the right way.

Whatever program you chose: You have to work hard and for a long time.

Hope that helps

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what style u wanna sing?? right now im using tvs and i think it really suits for wat i wanna sing metal/rock nd even pop. i used singing success and ktvaa both r good but didnt work for me for the style i wanna sing. My advice for u is if ur a beginner use singing success for removing bad habits theen use either ktva or tvs. You can use cvt 2 but its kinda advanced.

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What exactly do you mean by "grasping their demo"? One of the reasons why I have so much trouble finding a coach is because none of those reputated coaches sing the style I wanna sing.

it's just an opinion, but a guy learning from a guy is easier, similar breaks, timbre, etc.

when the teacher does a demonstration of an exercise it might be easier to hear what needs to be done.

what kind of music do you want to sing?

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Hey guys, thanks for the numerous replies.

As to what I wish to sing, it's Japanese Pop/Rock. Here's a good example of what I want to sing, and the style I want to develop: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W23g0MLSiWU

But sometimes, I'd also like to sing softer songs, here's an example:

This singer is the one who represents the best how I want to sing, and frankly, I was quite surprised to find a singer whose style is so similar to the one I've thought for myself in my head (lol).

Japanese styles aren't too similar with the ones we have here in America, and that's a factor that makes it so hard for me to choose a coach. I don't want to sing like a screamo, yelling in heavy distortion. I like singing high notes with power but also with vocal purity/clarity, with not much distortion nor heaviness.

I know the three teachers I've mentionned don't style coach, but teach us a technique that can applied to a lot of styles. However, I still base myself on how these coaches sound and sing to make my decision. Brett and his fellow associates sound too "classical" and soft to me, while I want to learn to sing a tad more hardcore style. Ken is a bit too hardcore for me (a lot of distortion and all), but then again I believe that I can learn to vary the distortion level myself, but what really puts me down about KTVA is the expensive lessons, set at 200$/hr. Lunte's relatively affordable rates really attract me (can anyone explain why his lessons are literally three times less expensive than Ken's or Brett's?), and I've read great things about him, but then again, personally, I personally don't really like his singing. People say it's important to be compatible with your coach, and I suppose I'd be better off with someone who has similar musical tastes as I to work with. So I get the feeling that unluckily, Lunte might not be compatible with me =/ Some people actually said that TVS method might develop excessive nasality, and sometimes, from listening to Lunte, I really do get that impression (sometimes, when he sings, he sounds nasal to me; might be intentional, so what do I know). Of course, I hope someone here can precisely clarify this nasality issue about TVS.

One more thing... I've had the SS program, and... after a few months (3 or 4), all I've gained is a very small increase in range (my top, superheadvoice-ish range went from about A flat to Female high C, that's about 5 scales on Brett's piano during the liprolls), and some loss of strain (throat used to hurt a bit when I reached A flat in liprolls, now I can go up to Female high C and go back down with no pain). But my passagio/mix hasn't developped AT ALL, I can't sing in one voice, can't go high without either pulling chest or going in falsetto. So that makes me wonder if any program is going to work for me at all... To be quite honest, a lot of times I don't even know what Brett is explaining, and I just don't know if I'm doing the exercices right at all. Is it simply because I'm dumb, or is it normal that working on a program alone without professional assistance/guidance (from private lessons) might be useless for some people (and maybe even bad for your voice, if instead of doing the exercices correctly, you do them awfully wrong)?

Anyway, thanks for your help guys! You're awesome! I'm impatiently waiting for replies!

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You might check materials, etc, by Roger Love. He's coached a few big names, including Rob Thomas (Matchbox 20.) Roger Love is all about finding the "middle" voice and his book "Set your Voice Free" never really touches on head voice. Some of the rock singers that have a high, clean, powerful voice started with classical lessons. Just because you might study classical technique does not mean that you have to sound like an opera singer.

And I know I'm going to catch hell and people are going to say "Ron, you're just on a classical kick, shut up, already."

Thing is, you just shot down, for one reason or another, the major singing systems out there that will teach you what you want to teach. Although, you haven't shot down CVT, yet. Try that one and see what you think.

Also, in for a penny, in for a pound. A former member of this forum did have bits of wisdom though he rubbed people the wrong way more than I do (happiness is relative.) For relatively cheap, 60 dollars a lesson or less, you can get coaching from people involved in local theater and opera. Yes, it's not your style of singing but there are basics to singing that are the same in several styles. Which shouldn't matter that much to you since are not wanting as much distortion as some systems named will teach.

Or is this one of those "mathematical" puzzles where no matter what we do or say, it just won't be right? I run into that now and then, too.

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Hey guys, thanks for the numerous replies.

As to what I wish to sing, it's Japanese Pop/Rock. Here's a good example of what I want to sing, and the style I want to develop: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W23g0MLSiWU

But sometimes, I'd also like to sing softer songs, here's an example:

This singer is the one who represents the best how I want to sing, and frankly, I was quite surprised to find a singer whose style is so similar to the one I've thought for myself in my head (lol).

Japanese styles aren't too similar with the ones we have here in America, and that's a factor that makes it so hard for me to choose a coach. I don't want to sing like a screamo, yelling in heavy distortion. I like singing high notes with power but also with vocal purity/clarity, with not much distortion nor heaviness.

I know the three teachers I've mentionned don't style coach, but teach us a technique that can applied to a lot of styles. However, I still base myself on how these coaches sound and sing to make my decision. Brett and his fellow associates sound too "classical" and soft to me, while I want to learn to sing a tad more hardcore style. Ken is a bit too hardcore for me (a lot of distortion and all), but then again I believe that I can learn to vary the distortion level myself, but what really puts me down about KTVA is the expensive lessons, set at 200$/hr. Lunte's relatively affordable rates really attract me (can anyone explain why his lessons are literally three times less expensive than Ken's or Brett's?), and I've read great things about him, but then again, personally, I personally don't really like his singing. People say it's important to be compatible with your coach, and I suppose I'd be better off with someone who has similar musical tastes as I to work with. So I get the feeling that unluckily, Lunte might not be compatible with me =/ Some people actually said that TVS method might develop excessive nasality, and sometimes, from listening to Lunte, I really do get that impression (sometimes, when he sings, he sounds nasal to me; might be intentional, so what do I know). Of course, I hope someone here can precisely clarify this nasality issue about TVS.

One more thing... I've had the SS program, and... after a few months (3 or 4), all I've gained is a very small increase in range (my top, superheadvoice-ish range went from about A flat to Female high C, that's about 5 scales on Brett's piano during the liprolls), and some loss of strain (throat used to hurt a bit when I reached A flat in liprolls, now I can go up to Female high C and go back down with no pain). But my passagio/mix hasn't developped AT ALL, I can't sing in one voice, can't go high without either pulling chest or going in falsetto. So that makes me wonder if any program is going to work for me at all... To be quite honest, a lot of times I don't even know what Brett is explaining, and I just don't know if I'm doing the exercices right at all. Is it simply because I'm dumb, or is it normal that working on a program alone without professional assistance/guidance (from private lessons) might be useless for some people (and maybe even bad for your voice, if instead of doing the exercices correctly, you do them awfully wrong)?

Anyway, thanks for your help guys! You're awesome! I'm impatiently waiting for replies!

flam, respectfully, you have what we call in america "analysis paralysis." you just need to start with someone. how you sound and develop as a singer is up to you, these people are just going to help you by giving you the tools and technique to improve your voice and prevent damage. you need to apply yourself against what they teach you...and they'll be plenty of "homework" too!..lol!!!

one or two lessons will help you decide if you have the right teacher. but just get moving my friend, you have a lot of work to do...lol!!!!

as far as cost, generally speaking for the most part it's irrelevent. ron anderson teaches lip bubbles and gets $400 an hour. ken tamplin get $200 an hour and teaches lip bubbles too. i have an opera singer who took a liking to me and he gets free dvds...lol!!!

let us hear you have an appointment scheduled with someone this monday.

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@ronws

Will check out Roger Love's stuff, thanks!

@VIDEOHERE

Honestly, even myself am realising that I might just be procrastinating by trying to choose the right coach among good coaches... lol. You're right, I need to start working. As soon as I'm done with my final exams... I'll hop to it!

Thanks again for the great advice!

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@ronws

Will check out Roger Love's stuff, thanks!

@VIDEOHERE

Honestly, even myself am realising that I might just be procrastinating by trying to choose the right coach among good coaches... lol. You're right, I need to start working. As soon as I'm done with my final exams... I'll hop to it!

Thanks again for the great advice!

yes, just jump in and get going...if you work at it, learn the core requisite skills, relaxation, posture, breath management and apply yourself consistently and dillgently i guarantee you improvement.

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Bob's post is so righteous, it deserves its own angelic choir singing "Amen!"

For example, one of Brett Manning's teachers is a former student of his and has such a phenomenal voice that doesn't sound like must students of SS. And, in my opinion, this guy sings better than Brett, though he has a lighter voice.

So, just because a learning system is "operatic" or "rock" doesn't mean you will sound like that instructor and, in fact, you shouldn't. I have read from one singing instructor, trained in a classical background who does absolutely no singing when she teaches. So that the student won't unconsciously try to sound like her. She teaches by speaking directions. For the object of the lesson is to develope the student's voice, not create a copy of the teacher's voice.

Then, again, I see so many people chasing the almighty "rasp." Here is the difference between classical, country, pop, and rock. The use of language and accent. Not the singing basics, but how the words are used and expressed. Granted, there are some timbre differences.

Anyway, find one that suits your voice and dig in. Or better, if you can, find a local coach who can hear you in the same room, which is going to sound different than what you sound like through digital processing.

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