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vocal register confusion

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leon_bolot
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hi, my name is Lino, I'm a new member here, and I'm from Indonesia

I use singing success program to get me started into vocal training. before, i don't even know how to sing and i often sang out of tune.

but i have come a long way since then, it's been two years and I've had several different vocal coaches. the thing is, it's pretty hard to find a decent teacher here where i live.

so, long story short, my church have hired a vocal teacher to train our singers team and I has been three months. Most of the time though, I feel very uncomfortable working with her because she did not emphasize on correct vocal reproduction. instead, she emphasize on voice blending, supporting the worship leader, singing in tune, etc ( her background is choral music). there was one moment when she had me hit a note that I don't know what note that is, and it took me a lot of effort to finally hit it right. then, out of my curiousity, I tried my own scale on the piano, and I can hit up to G5 pretty easily ( I'm not quite sure my voice type is but my past teachers said I'm a bass ).

then i read somewhere that bass vocal ranges goes from G2 to E4. and my question is, can i really go up to G5 if I'm a bass, can I go higher?'

thanks for all input

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Vocal classification is troublesome subject. There are different genres and styles with different definitions, and classifying prematurely does everyone a disservice. You won't know what you are comfortable with until you trained for years and even then you shouldn't rule out learning new thing.

Range is only part of the equation with timber and tone being important as well. Essentially you're a bass if your voice is well-trained and has the optimal resonance and versatility in the low range. Theoretically there could be a tenor able to hit the exact same notes but with a different physiological makeup that makes his resonance stronger in the high range.

From what I've read, heard and aurally experienced hitting a G5 is perfectly normal for men who experiment with their voices (basses, baritones and tenors alike). There's just a difference between a thin falsetto-G5 and something like this:

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From what I've read, heard and aurally experienced hitting a G5 is perfectly normal for men who experiment with their voices (basses, baritones and tenors alike). There's just a difference between a thin falsetto-G5 and something like this:

surely i can't do the shrieking like he does in the video. and i'm not using falsetto either when i hit the G5.

so, simply saying, is there a limit for a certain kind of voice type on how high we can go? or it all depends on how much we practice, meaning we can go as high as we want, provided we train enough?

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