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MB20
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I have decided to start making a more conscious effort to establish a regular practice routine and practice diaries. I have a number of programs, some of which I have never even tried (got a bit carried away with gathering information as opposed to actually practicing maybe...!)

however, what I would like to know is would it be more beneficial to work on one of thee programs for an extended period of time or use a combination? I can see the weaknesses and strengths of both. Settling on one program would allow me to give it my full attention and prevent any confusion with other methods, however, I would hate to commit to one and then a year later find it has not been very useful (I do realise that this is all part of the process, but I like to be as efficient as possible!) however If i concentrated on a few at once, I could find out what works best for me, however I don't know if splitting my attention between everything would be too overwhelming and actually prove unproductive...

any suggestions? how did you guys go about choosing what to study and creating practice routines?

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I have decided to start making a more conscious effort to establish a regular practice routine and practice diaries. I have a number of programs, some of which I have never even tried (got a bit carried away with gathering information as opposed to actually practicing maybe...!)

however, what I would like to know is would it be more beneficial to work on one of thee programs for an extended period of time or use a combination? I can see the weaknesses and strengths of both. Settling on one program would allow me to give it my full attention and prevent any confusion with other methods, however, I would hate to commit to one and then a year later find it has not been very useful (I do realise that this is all part of the process, but I like to be as efficient as possible!) however If i concentrated on a few at once, I could find out what works best for me, however I don't know if splitting my attention between everything would be too overwhelming and actually prove unproductive...

any suggestions? how did you guys go about choosing what to study and creating practice routines?

mb20, in my "non-instructor" opinion, i really believe now that i've put some solid time into this, as long as you are doing the exercises correctly, are not having pain or abnormal discomfort (and, the big one) you stick at it 5-6 days a week, week after week any vocal exercise program from a reputable source will help in one way or the other.

i still like the analogy to body-building....if you do the legendary, tried and tested core exercises, bench, squats, curls, overhead press, abs, chinups, you can build a strong body. later if you want to do those more targeted exercises, you do them...

if you do core vocal exercises (those tried and proven) such as, but not limited to...lip bubbles, sirens, scales, arpeggios, etc., you will grow the voice.....it's not the program, it's the user and his mind/body connection and the truth is it can be so g.d. gradual you just have to hang in there and be patient.

for me, i'm starting to get this new sensation of being able to sense a tone that's not in the resonance pocket optimally, (even though and it still can sound good) and being able to adjust to improve the liklihood of a "resonance bullseye" for that much desired ring and ping and release. kind of like throwing darts....tough to explain.

but sometimes it occurs automatically and you say to yourself "shit! how the hell do i repeat that tone, and it comes to you that you need to adjust (something) just a hair and bingo you're in the pocket dead on....

do some of you folks feel these same sensations? how do you adjust?

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but sometimes it occurs automatically and you say to yourself "shit! how the hell do i repeat that tone, and it comes to you that you need to adjust (something) just a hair and bingo you're in the pocket dead on....

do some of you folks feel these same sensations? how do you adjust?

Yes, and the video you linked in from Michael Goodrich in another thread explains it quite well. Tuning a vowel.

A certain note requires a particular resonating space or shape. In congruence with that, vowels are created by changes in the resonator. Specifically, the harmonics. Once you get a spot like G5 or so, the resonating space becomes too small to bolster much if any harmonics (that's why it sounds like pretty much one vowel at the very tippy top for a lot of people.) Anyway, what you are a calling the pocket is a resonating space specifically suited for the vowel you are singing at that pitch. And it feels like your head is a bell and someone just rang the bell. Proper resonance creates a volume increase. Resonance, in general is what gives a note its timbre.

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Regarding the original post, the effort is in the singer. As for singing systems, don't confuse the effectiveness of the system with how the teacher sounds. Let's say that one singer/teacher you are viewing sounds "nasally" to you and that you don't like that. Listen to some of the students of the program and you will find they don't all sound like the teacher.

Likewise, you could totally dig how Jaime Vendera sounds and you won't sound just like him, even if you follow ste-by-step, from the neck rolls to the suggested products. Because you are not him. He explains this in his book, quite well. So, I will repeat it (paraphrased.) For years, he tried to sound like Steve Perry and wanted to sing Journey songs all the time. And couldn't get "that" sound. And beat himself bloody over it. Then, one day, for grits and shins, tried "The Immigrant Song." Totally nailed it, no stress, bringing relaxation, even. And found his "niche." He has a voice like Robert Plant's. That does not mean that he sounds like him. But he has a similar voice. If you go with his system, you will not sound like Jaime Vendera or Robert Plant. You will sound like MB20, with solid support and resonance and strength and conviction.

The core that Bob mentions is the important thing. Breathing, stability of the larynx, and (as I like to say) allowing the resonance to happen. Problem is, different systems use different nomenclature and mental approaches. Some say sing like you speak. Some say start in chest and carry that up. Others say start in head and bring it down to chest. Some have modes, largely based on vowel usage, I think.

It also depends on what you want from your singing. Jeff Soto says that you can't sing AC/DC stuff clean because it just won't be right for a performance. I beg to differ, and I am most certainly wrong in my difference, I know that. Which is particular to my psychology.

If you want rasp, there are teachers who can help you with that. But it is an effect or style one should only learn, in my opinion, after learning the basics Bob mentioned. Which system would that be? The one that helps you do what you want to do with discomfort and/or damage. At no time should any singing training involve the loss of ability or voice. No pain - no gain has absolutely no place in singing. If it hurts or damages, it is wrong. And yes, that is the "hill I am willing to die on."

It involves your personal aesthetic. I like the styles of Robert Lunte, Kevin Richards, and Ken Tamplin. Though I wouldn't sound like them even following their every move and step. Case in point, I am following classical methods. But I do not sound like an opera singer. If anything, I can best describe my voice as sounding like Mike Reno. (I don't know if others think that is good or bad and maybe I pay myself too much of a compliment.)

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As a growing and learning vocalist I have found that the more I become aware of, the better. It's sort of like religion. There are so many, they can't all be right. But there are common values which I think we can all agree are pretty good things to live by. For me, I've been exposed to Singing Success/Brett Manning, Roger Love, Per Bristow, classical-style voice teachers, Rob Lunte's Pillars, and probably a few others that I can't remember... I think that I've been learning consistently because it's a journey. I go back and find gems in previous programs that I didn't pick up at the time. And I think that's the important thing.

It's so easy to attach yourself to the latest programme or teacher that has helped you, but at the end of the day I think you just have to keep working on the basics (breath/support, vocal folds/phonation, resonance/placement, performance/artistry, diction and vowel purity, etc).

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