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Singing higher with depth

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NCdan
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Recently I discovered that I was singing higher up in my larynx without realizing it (I know, I'm pretty slow sometimes.) Once I started singing lower in my larynx I found that not only did my tone "open up" more, but that I also gained oomph that people had said my voice had been missing before. However, I like the sound of singing up higher in my larynx, but I'd like to be able to do that without sounding "light" or "shallow," if that makes sense. The "depth" and "oomph" is there naturally when singing in what I'll refer to as neutral in my larynx (aka the middle I think,) but how do you keep that "boom" in your voice when moving up higher in the larynx?

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Most untrained singers and badly trained when they ascend the scale higher their larynx, the result is unhealthy singing that can cause to troubles in their voice. When you will sing freely, healthy production, you will sound your best, with all the qualities that you mentioned: depth and so on.

You need to take lessons, which in them you keep your larynx low, with patience, your singing mechanism will work better.

Good luck :)

by the way -

Im in a contest of who gets the most likes will perform in the "THE VOICE" program here in Israel. Im doing a 30sec from CRY ME A RIVER - JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE. Listen and if you like it give a LIKE ;)

http://​reshet.thevoiceauditions.ynet.c​o.il/2012/auditions/​%d7%98%d7%99%d7%92%d7%a8%d7%9f-​14/

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The larynx must not be "neutral" nor "high" or "low". Depending on the tone, it will fluctuate around the most confortable position it finds, naturally. Once this is achieved, you can easily bring it a little lower or higher depending on the intention on how you want your voice to sound as an interpretative choice.

But this is not the same as pressing it down or letting it just climb high because of excessive air pressure. The first will veil and mask your timbre and will result in airy emission. The later will completely kill depth and will result on a excessively pressed emission. Both can be corrected through the use of support and a more natural overall posture.

And yes, the overall position in which the larynx will be is usually a little lower than what you use on your spoken voice, still you should not tamper directly with the position by pressing it down.

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But this is not the same as pressing it down or letting it just climb high because of excessive air pressure. The first will veil and mask your timbre and will result in airy emission. The later will completely kill depth and will result on a excessively pressed emission.

The latter is what I believe I'm referring to in my post. I like the sound when my larynx is higher, it's just the lack of depth that people comment on and I have to admit they are right. I'm not saying I always want to sing like this, but surely there must be vocalists who sing mostly with their larynx higher and manage to not sound too shallow? While I can't speak for anyone, to my ears it sounds like a lot of punk rock vocalists sing higher in their larynx without losing too much depth and intensity of tone, whether they are singing "clean," or with distortion or vocal fry. Is there some secret I'm not privy to?

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If its the later, then you will need to first correct the problem which in most cases is a symptom of support problems or just lack of it.

BTW, this is very demanding on your larynx. Its rising due to the pressure it is trying to hold back in the first place. Its plain and simple a waste of energy and will hurt you as time goes by.

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Well let's put it this way. Many singers in popular styles sing with relatively neutral larynx positions. Then we have genres such as hard rock, metal, punk and parts of gospel and soul which use a high larynx position a lot. Then some genres such as "classical" (opera, art songs, etc) or gospel again, and some styles of country/folk use lowered larynx a lot as well. I don't think that any position is necessarily harmful, only if you FORCE it, and if there is not enough of the other good stuff, such as support and resonance/placement.

A lot of punk rock vocalists do indeed sing with a high larynx position, although this is usually not by choice, rather because they don't know any other way ;) Although this high larynx position is sometimes used to get a VERY angsty and "punk" sound, it's important to remember that you have to have the other parts of singing down right. Many punk rock singers trash their voice and/or lose their tone as they get older. I think Bad Religion and Rise Against are good examples of bands with singers who have stayed good, but I think this is quite rare. So take care and strongly consider lessons from someone who knows what they're talking about and will accommodate your needs (punk rock singing!)

Anyway it's just advice. Good luck :)

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I don't think that any position is necessarily harmful, only if you FORCE it, and if there is not enough of the other good stuff, such as support and resonance/placement.

Good to know. I think that once I get up high enough in my larynx, even though it is comfotable, I don't have the strength (or perhaps the support strength) to give any depth to the tone. Although, I would wager a guess that once anyone raises their larynx past a certain point it's nigh impossible to get depth period?

A lot of punk rock vocalists do indeed sing with a high larynx position, although this is usually not by choice, rather because they don't know any other way

Well at least it's good to know that I wasn't alone on that one...

Although this high larynx position is sometimes used to get a VERY angsty and "punk" sound, it's important to remember that you have to have the other parts of singing down right. Many punk rock singers trash their voice and/or lose their tone as they get older.

I've realized that I was singing up quite high in my larynx and had accepted this as normal. Bringing it down sounded a bit odd to me after singing for about 1 1/2 years with a raised larynx, but I caught on quickly. However, singing with my larynx in "neutral" and using distortion/fry sounds like I'm trying to squeeze out a turd the size of Texas. I've been experimenting with slowly raising the larynx, trying to find a middle ground between neutral and high, and I like the results so far. Thanks for the advice.

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Natural and unforced is the key. True power comes from resonance and not pushing from your diaphragm or any other bad vocal techniques mentioned above :)

not pushing from the diaphragm, but applying dynamic opposition to it's return is good technique i'm learning.

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