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How does the common cold help with bass notes?

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For me it doesn't. Mine is best when I'm dehydrated or inhaling fast, cold air and then exhaling hot, slow air. I think the lack of lubrication in on my vocal folds creates friction which allows the air to grab a larger part of the fold. Or something. With a cold, excess fluid will drip to create a complete closure which results in a creaky sound which is not desirable.

As for thickening, perhaps it's like a higher gauge string on an instrument?

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swollen folds, more blood, more mass, more rigidity. Can sustain phonation with less lenghtening of the folds. You may feel more resonance due to the incresead sensibility of the tissue of your vocal tract, but it surelly isnt "better" because of it, if anything, there should be more dampening.

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Everything said is possible, but I still believe a better explanation lies in that the entire vocal tract is feeling down due to the cold, and in particular, some set of muscles wants to be particularly wants to be more relaxed. This relaxation is somehow shifting my bass resonance significantly, but I am unable to determine how this exactly happens. How does one maximize bass usually?

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Your voice isnt more relaxed in à sickened state rather the contrary. What happens is like above poster states the folds swell alittle getting more mass and more closure. Aswell as lownotes whistleregister sounds tend to get alot easyer.

Then ofc there are always cases that stand out and differ from the masses, you might be getting more relaxation it's very Hard to Tell or spot. We sure as hell cant Tell behind à computer without hearing you :)

The general and BEST;) explenation is still swelling of the folds

Cheers

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As I so far understand it, the vocal cord folds get thicker, has more mass, and closure due to cold, and hence, it follows from above, my vocal cords muscular control has less applied force, and produce lesser frequencies. My personal evidence is also that my bass is more robust, suggesting cords' lower pitch is further coupled with some kind of relaxed resonance effects.

What I'm interested in is: how exactly to replicate this without a cold.

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As I so far understand it, the vocal cord folds get thicker, has more mass, and closure due to cold, and hence, it follows from above, my vocal cords muscular control has less applied force, and produce lesser frequencies. My personal evidence is also that my bass is more robust, suggesting cords' lower pitch is further coupled with some kind of relaxed resonance effects.

What I'm interested in is: how exactly to replicate this without a cold.

bass and baritone singers characteristically have thicker vocal folds, while tenors have thinner folds. a cold can easily swell the folds.

you don't want to replicate this. you're either endowed with thicker folds physiologically or you're not.

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Thicker folds, more mass, lower frequencies due to the physics of tissues moving slower-- OK, that makes sense. More robust volume while ill--resonance explanation of some kind. When ill, everything is thrown off, and can't rely on a simply a vocal cords explanation. There's a good clue here on how to improve the voice.

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Because the lower limit is given exactly by relaxing, not tension. The lower limit of your range in full voice is the point where the chords are so relaxed that full closure is not possible, so you relax closure and enter in fry.

Supporting it will surelly help, since you will get things much more stable. Still the lower limit is given by the physical construction of your larynx, you cant simply change it at will.

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Thank you for a better explanation, Felipe. I still think it's incomplete.

How does one know one's lowest range--when are the chords are so thus relaxed, as you've described? (A cold probably helps, because then the autonomic part of the body (instead of the volitional) forces the body and chords to be more relaxed.)

As you know, the total volume produced and voice texture are still more affected by resonance; hence, this would again suggest, bass resonance can actually increase, when ill-autonomic-relaxed.

Until one "knows" his true lower range, one never really knows how relaxed his chords can really be-- and a cold can provide a clue. Furthermore, resonance changes during a cold further provide clues.

Yes, the construct of the larynx determines the lowest bass possible; how one reaches the potential of his lower bass is not yet described.

Also, even a light-weight can gain a lot of strength. Why not also push the limits of one’s bass potential, with power?

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Thank you for a better explanation, Felipe. I still think it's incomplete.

How does one know one's lowest range--when are the chords are so thus relaxed, as you've described? (A cold probably helps, because then the autonomic part of the body (instead of the volitional) forces the body and chords to be more relaxed.)

As you know, the total volume produced and voice texture are still more affected by resonance; hence, this would again suggest, bass resonance can actually increase, when ill-autonomic-relaxed.

Until one "knows" his true lower range, one never really knows how relaxed his chords can really be-- and a cold can provide a clue. Furthermore, resonance changes during a cold further provide clues.

Yes, the construct of the larynx determines the lowest bass possible; how one reaches the potential of his lower bass is not yet described.

Also, even a light-weight can gain a lot of strength. Why not also push the limits of one’s bass potential, with power?

So, you believe that further relaxing the chords will solve a limit that appears due to them being relaxed?

I dont follow.

Edit:

I dont see why arent the lower notes well described, please clarify.

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Felipe,

I don't know how one knows of his true relaxed limit. A lot of modern and Eastern psychology suggests the subconscious is more effective at this. In a cold, the subconscious system takes over.

What I'm asking is, how does one become aware of his true lower range, rather than his usually volitionally perceived lower range. And if this lower range exists in a still more relaxed state, how to harness this.

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Ofc you should aim to develop your lowerregister and it can get stronger and deeper specialy with age. Nobodys Said otherwise, what i belive s that you wont Find Any clue in your coldvoice wich can be applied to your normal voice.

If you do great, you can learn from every experience but i doubt that it's something that can be applied as an universal fact...

Your resonance is diffrent because your folds are swelling, you can illustrare this differance by taking à thin rubberband and stretch it out, now take an equaly long but thicker rubberband and stretch it out. Now twang the smallone and then later the big one... :)

Resonance is also determines by the entire voicebox, the common cold actualy decreases resonance as your throat gets tighter and sinuses plugs. Its just the extremes of your range that gets crazy.

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Hi Jens,

I understand the rubber bands explanation; what I'm saying is that the analogy is incomplete, because, I'm suggesting an entire apparatus (the whole instrument) is changing in a cold.

Hi Felipe,

I don't understand fry, so maybe I missed something completely.

In your explanation, what I don't understand is how an individual is able to determine what his true lowest note really is. How is he able to volitionally determine this accurately?

What I'm saying is that the entire autonomic system causes the vocal tract to become more relaxed, due to a cold, and I'm suggesting that prior-conscious-interferences to relaxation are now more relaxed-- which is why the bass can sound more robust-- due to both the chords vibrating slower and the more relaxed resonating vocal apparatus. And I'm suggesting, if this is what's happening in a cold, then it should be possible to harvest this volitionally.

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Ok lets assume your right, you also get more relaxed when sick and thus getting more resonance and range. But still the majority Will come from the swelling of the folds. I belive that range can be expanded in both ways both high and low.

But i think your wasting your time seeking some hidden key technique from your sick voice... Get à vocalcoach used to lower voices and work on technique.

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