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i like that word "exert"

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this is a word i just came upon to help describe what is needed (at times) for really great, intense, powerful, resonant singing.

"proper exertion."

how well do we exert ourselves when we practise or perform? i consider proper exertion an essential component.

it's knowing how to adjust exertion levels as we sing, isn't it?

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Yeah, I listened and gave comments in a reply to your email. It sounded freakin' GREAT! :) I think many people here would be surprised to hear how good you sing, Bob. You should let more people hear your voice.

thanks you jonpall. i really apprecaite it. i sing that way because it's how i want to sound. i'm not sure everyone wants to sound like that.

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Nah, I just think you don't want to be critiqued. :P

Never stopped me. I stick my neck right out there, heck or high water ...

No wonder I keep using up styptic pencils ... ah, it's just a flesh wound, I'm feeling better already ..

(quick, which movie is that last line from?)

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You sound great!

And I agree 100%. There is real exertion in singing, sometimes a LOT of exertion but it's the good kind :) Learning how to use this coordinated, strong effort is the real challenge.

thanks folks,

that means a lot to me.

in my opinion, the vocal exercises that are used to condition the lower core and breathing muscles are some the most beneficial ones you can do. if you are conditioned and strong down below, it's that much easier to stay relaxed above. the throat becomes nothing but a passive resonating cylinder and the vocal folds are freed to do their thing unencumbered.

i wish i had an old recording of me singing that passage when i first tried it....lol!!!!

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in my opinion, the vocal exercises that are used to condition the lower core and breathing muscles are some the most beneficial ones you can do. if you are conditioned and strong down below, it's that much easier to stay relaxed above. the throat becomes nothing but a passive resonating cylinder and the vocal folds are freed to do their thing unencumbered.

Yes! I'm beginning to realise finally that the reason why sometimes I felt I could do anything vocally, and then lose it after 30-60 minutes of singing was the tiring of my support, and I didn't know what was happening so other muscles would take over... And we all know where that leads ;)

Now when I exercise my voice, after a time I actaully FEEL my support failing (as well as hearing it in my voice) and I rest and train more later. The idea is to build up that ability. Of course I've had my support go during long jam sessions and that just sucks...! Hehe

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Just curious bob, do you do sit-ups or whatever to strengthen your core too? Or are you just talking about breathing/vocal exercises?

basic breathing exercises...

i just want to say that not everyone feels these are required. i believe for the kind of singing i like to do, which is the belting, power ballads and all of these middle-note-heavy, and interval jump songs, these exercises are so beneficial.

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Excellent, of course.

And I wanted to echo a point from Bounce. Wherein the breath management mechanism gets tired and so one starts compensating in the throat. This can happen to trained musicians with plenty of technique when they are on a heavy touring schedule. They just get tired and the compensation takes place, wearing them out. That's why rest is important.

Bob, way cool sound. It really does sound similar to Gramm. Not a carbon copy but certainly the same feel.

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Yes! I'm beginning to realise finally that the reason why sometimes I felt I could do anything vocally, and then lose it after 30-60 minutes of singing was the tiring of my support, and I didn't know what was happening so other muscles would take over... And we all know where that leads

I suddenly had an epiphany.

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I suddenly had an epiphany.

you are basically transferring the tension downward into the voices engine, and relieving the vocal folds of anything that would impede their action and freedom.

lately, the only thing i've noticed is you have to be careful to still remember to actively coordinate and release into the head voice (let go of the "t/a" and bring in more "c/t") as you go higher.

the support has a way of making you feel as if you don't need to do that as much, like you suddenly have added more notes to your chest. but i think thinning out is a safer way to go.

geno, do you agree?

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