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Talking voice affecting my singing?

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steve95
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I think the bad habits from my talking voice is affecting my singing technique....

When I talk, I feel a bit of a strain on my neck, and this weird feeling remains there after I talk for a bit....

And I thought to myself... "Maybe this is how singing with bad technique feels like."

Should I learn to use proper technique in my TALKING voice as well? To minimize my bad habits? How can I do this?

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I think a speech therapist would be the way to go with improving your talking technique.

When it comes to neck strain, I have found that entering a state of extreme relaxed-ness from your neck up when practicing singing has helped me. I simply transfer all that tension down to my abdomen. If need be I will keep a light hand on my neck/jaw so I can feel if any tension starts developing there. I'm not saying this is proper performance technique, but I do credit it with being the #1 thing that helped me let go of unwanted tension.

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here's an extremely helpful exercise my voice therapist had given me and i just read in a recent kindle book:

called "resonance in singing and speaking" by thomas fillebrown. i bought the kindle download for $1.99 and it's a great read.

you need to learn to focus the voice into the upper resonators. focusing the voice into the upper resonators helps get it out of the throat.

one pitch

middle, comfortable note

soft to medium volume

sing "hung", hold the "ng" portion for 4 beats, then sing the vowels listed in the order listed on one breath per vowel

hung, ee, oo, oh, aw, ah

make sure you don't force the tone, and only use the lips and tongue to produce the vowels. there should be hardly any movement of the mouth to produce the vowels. produce the vowels in the same place you feel the "ng."

try them. they have helped me greatly in my singing and speaking.

this exercise will teach you to focus or place the voice higher

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Really interesting tread. I gonna buy this book since speaking loudly has also become a problem for my singing.

Especially when you like going in loud places like bars and nightclubs, and everybody expects you to play lately while you have spent your evening screaming to make yourself heard.

I will definitely give it a look.

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Really interesting tread. I gonna buy this book since speaking loudly has also become a problem for my singing.

Especially when you like going in loud places like bars and nightclubs, and everybody expects you to play lately while you have spent your evening screaming to make yourself heard.

I will definitely give it a look.

i spent months rehabilitating the voice after my polyp. please feel free to skype call me if you want to discuss.

your speaking voice and how you might be improperly using it, can land you in a lot of trouble.

videohere@earthlink.net

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Yeah, it was called resonant speaking. Let your voice float to where it is comfortable and resonates fully. This will actually help train some of your breath management. In a sense, you should aim to speak like sing, rather than sing like you speak. For the 800 lb gorilla in the room is that, in most cases, speaking is using vowels and air differently than what is required for efficient and durable singing.

In some cultures, such as the american south, men are supposed to have a booming baritone or bass voice when they speak. It's more "manly." And they end up de-tuning their voices, in doing so, in my opinion. Or they think it would be cool to sound like the Kergan as played by Clancy Brown in "The Highlander."

Here's a secret. Brown's natural speaking voice is a bit higher than the movie. The effect was achieve by both him affecting a sound effect with his voice, topped by how the dialog soundtrack was mixed for his parts. Let your voice speak comfortable where it wants to be, not where you think it should be.

It's idiotic to think that a man with a high voice is not masculine. Mike Tyson's voice is pitched higher than mine is, by at least a few steps. And he, in his first major heavyweight bout, won by full knockout (as in the opponent was unconscious) in 45 seconds. I'm not going to tell him he's unmanly ....

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