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for those doing anthony frisell's head voice slides, please respond

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folks, these questions are for those who are working on, or have worked on those anthony frisell head voice slides.

1. do you find your tone taking on a very loud sounding "tunnel like" sound?

2. have your slides grown to sound thick and cavernous or remained the same as you started?

3. do you feel like the chest register wants to connect almost automatically to you head register?

4. do you find that working with the "oo" vowel, you built what frisell calls that "head voice ramp?"

can you please let me know?

i cannot get over what those slides are doing for (i guess cvt folks call it curbing) "mixed voice."

thanks,

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great stuff, isn't it? do you feel like you can direct air to specific places with it?

Yes it is free to move, can change it to fully forward, and it becomes more chest or full back (what Ive been trainning) and it remains in head. Moving fully forward and then back is quite hard, I often lose the posture, and thats precisely the problem I gotta get rid of.

It will be a long road....

But its already sooo much better than before that I am positive that its worth it.

Man I found his blog.

The information there is VERY nice, there are some terminology conflicts but the core principles are all there.

What do you feel when you do the oo -> full voice thing?

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Bob -

Here are my answers -

1. Yes, it can get really loud, and depending on where its placed, 'hollow' sounding (of sorts!)

2. The slides are slightly thicker than when I started, but I deliberately keep the 'detached falsetto' sound as light as I can, because I have a pretty deep speaking voice and its easier to connect with the head voice when things are lighter. Using this has helped a lot with the Messa Di Voce also, and I can make that pretty damn loud now!! :)

3. At times.. I haven't reached a stage where it happens all the time, but yes, the chest voice is starting to creep in and add body to the heady sound, when it clicks its a great sound!

4. Work in Progress... Still building, but the 'oo' has helped me for sure. Again, its only been about 6 weeks doing these exercises, but I can imagine what it'll lead to in a year :)

I think the slides help the throat muscles configure themselves to produce the sound without straining the throat. Add to that exercises like the Messa Di Voce and you start gaining control of dynamics and tone in a healthy manner.

cheers

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felipe, i hear ya man. can you share the link to the blog you found?

frisell had me vocalize from "oo" to "ee" to "oh" to "aw" to "ah" all in one breath in what he refers to as mixed voice.

a clean "oo" in mixed voice is pretty tough. i add a shade of "oh" in release it better.

bigfoot, thanks for the reply. i agree with it all.

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VH- are you just using the exercises in his books or what he gave you? I would imagine the latter. I notice that my speaking voice takes on some of the same qualities as the singing voice. So there's this lighter sound to my speaking voice but it's all kinda bridged. Does that even make sense? Still, because I haven't been JUST doing his stuff and because I've been having reflux issues bad, it's not been something I've been able to work on as much. When you're working, it's very hard to take on a new method or approach without there being some kind of compromise. Once you get there, great, but the transition (and Frissell mentions this) can be difficult.

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i hear ya bill. i had 4 lessons with frisell.

the decscending slides gets you in better shape when it comes time to bring in chest.

i still have to mix the chest in (messa vi voce) but the slides made my head register deeper and stronger so that it melds with chest.

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I was considering his books, too, probably the baritone one. But I've been hesitant as I didn't see any kind of audio example accompaniment with the books. I've never bought a singing instruction book without audio examples, online or mp3's or videos etc. Are there any audio examples available with his books? If not, did you find it hard to learn with just text?

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This is a good question Truth1ness. There are no audio examples. It's still a great read. I do wish that I had examples of the lessons. It would make it much easier learn the method. I was actually checking in to ask VH what notes he was singing for his siren. Is it the exercise from B down to the D with the OO EE?

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@ Truth1ness -

It is a bit of an issue not having audio samples, but to be honest, Frisell explains the sensations that one feels in the throat and head etc so well that his book is a must have just to understand WHY and HOW the voice works the way it does. Also, he'll hammer in the basics which are very important, and give some pretty simple exercises to help strengthen the voice.

Not ideal, but by no means a deal breaker. Its still easier to work with than a lot of other programs which just say " do XYZ".

Hope this helps.

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Bigfoot,

When you say the sound can get really loud, how loud are we talking? Mine, too, can get quite loud, especially the closer I get to high C and beyond; however, it is still never as loud as the full voice coordination on the same note. What is your experience with this?

~~Dante~~

Dante -

I'll post a recording this weekend of me attempting a reverse Messa Voce on 'ee' (starting loud, going soft, and going loud again). I find it easier to do this a couple of times through the passagio (starting with G over middle C and coming down to Bb below middle C) as it helps my throat structure the required muscles properly.

After this I attempt a regular Messa Voce, which on some days comes out well, and on others not so much, but that also takes a long time to master, and I've only been at it for a few weeks.. :)

As for volume, my full voice is currently is a bit louder, but on the 'EE' vowel, I can swell the sound till it feels like my head will explode! Also, the configuration of my throat when I sing in full voice is not the same as when I exercise. I assume this is because I had incorrect technique earlier, and now I'm trying to consciously avoid singing by pulling chest at all, even if it means singing in a light voice till I'm comfortable, and then I slowly start adding volume and power to it. I can't comfortably hit a High C yet (once in a while).. but in the passagio notes is what I'm talking about.

Will record and post tomorrow - should give you guys a fair idea of what I'm saying, and it'll give me a chance to get some feedback!!

Cheers

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People asking Bob if he learned what Frisell meant from audio recordings (which are not available with the kindle download.) For Bob, the audios are a moot point, as he has been getting the sound ideal from the author, in person. It's just a matter of reading the thread. He has had at least 4 visits with the author, providing he has someone who can cover his shift at the store. Which gets expensive. Paying someone to work that day. Paying for travel to get there. Paying for the lesson. As well as the paycheck he didn't earn that day.

Bob's like any of us, he works a day job and sneaks his singing practice into the nooks and crannies of the day.

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I've only seen one person ask the question about audio. Nope, Frisell doesn't have a dvd/download/mp3/cassette/45/78 version of his program. You really DO need to read the books (they're cheap). They are very straightforward. However, having said that, it would be nice if there were transcriptions of the piano scales for those that have a difficult time transcribing the notes from the written page.

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thank you brother ron.

folks, did you ever read a book on voice where the author just says things in it that you just completely relate to, that you are either experiencing, or you don't know how to explain something, but the author knows all too well what you're going through?

that's frisell. when i worked with him, i was doing some serious exercises. he really worked me. he's very strict, but a nice older guy.

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thank you brother ron.

folks, did you ever read a book on voice where the author just says things in it that you just completely relate to, that you are either experiencing, or you don't know how to explain something, but the author knows all too well what you're going through?

that's frisell. when i worked with him, i was doing some serious exercises. he really worked me. he's very strict, but a nice older guy.

Yes.

And, I am still envious of your chance to work with Frisell.

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A tip to find the oo position on the falsetto (its crucial that it is properly placed).

Listen to "o mio babbino caro" and mimic the soprano on falsetto, but go for it, a nice resonating falsetto, can be a bit airy if its easier. Notice how the first vowel comes out in "o mio". If its high and you feel nothing on your throat, thats the oo you are looking for.

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