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how do I stop "choking off" the sound at the top of my range?

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Shrike123311
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I literally cannot feel the note anymore once I go above "G", and get this breathy, whispery mixed register that is disgustingly weak to say the least.

when I try to put any force or power into it, my voice cracks or simply won't let me move any further.

Diaphragm support is really weird at that height; how do I know if I'm supporting right? I find that flexing or pressing on my diaphragm doesn't help, yet I know I inflate it and push using it, rather than my throat. I've gotten a lot better at brightening my tone but I want to keep my rasp and my power as I ascend without the tension.

Wat do?

;_;

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Do it without rasp first. Don't worry about that until everything else is working. I can also infer from the whispery description you give that you may be using too much air. You want to hold it back or else your vocal cords wont adduct fully. The extra air blows them apart.

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hm. Neither, actually.

When I hit my higher areas (E4-G#4), I can maintain compression if I press really hard on my diaphragm, but as I ascend, my throat also closes up under the weight.. so I know I'm doing it wrong. However, when I open my throat and relax to project the note, I lose all the power that I usually get with the weight shifting upwards, and I lose the "feel" of the notes. The note comes out clear, but breathy, like a really heavy falsetto, and I can pull it back into chest voice, but only from E or lower.

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Hi Shrike123311. That means , following your description that you don't use your support system . once you will learn how to your your body to support your singing you will have control on almost every sound you might make. That is all depend also at other aspect, but first SUPPORT.

you can take a loot at the last post that someone asked. I wrote something about it too if you want to read. If you need more help, let me know! :) good luck . (it is a long one , so I am copying it for you) those exercises might give you a hand too. )

"

Hi D. starr. I can give you some input about your post. try not to think about your belly but on your low back. I have found it much more helpful through the years that support working starting using our back muscles instead of concentrating on your belly will give you much more control of your singing and much more power too. I can give you couple of exercises to try, if you please.

1. sit on a folder chair. sit only on the edge. and let your body go down . totally down with your head too (almost reaching your legs). put your hands on your low back and try to take air. the idea is NOT letting the stomach take all the air, instead run it through your back (low back ). after taking air just let it go in any way you prefer (ssssss, fffffff.... shhhh ect) while taking out air try to have slowly a control on air and not let it go out quickly at the beginning but hold it. not too much. than repeat it (till you get tired of it).

2. try when you sing to work with a chair. while singing just stand up and sit down , all while singing. try to get up and sit down slowly (not fast). that will help you start feeling a bit sense of support

3. you can instead of siting and getting up from a chair, do the same thing going on the chair and going down the chair. "

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One does not directly control the diaphragm. It is an autonomic muscle. One controls exhalation by using the abdominals, including the obliques (which is what people should mean about breath from the "back"). It helps to think of it as not blowing a lot of air but controlling the air. That is, the air speed is not so different, but the pressure at the folds is subtly different. Think of the abs as the string on an archery bow. Instead of letting the string zip back like one does to shoot an arrow, think of slowly allowing the string back to it's previous state.

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  • 2 weeks later...

You've got to support lower than your diaphram. It feels great when you do it right. Like you've got a very powerful steady breath, and no tension in the throat. It sounds like you may have to modify the vowels too to get the right reasonance. I would follow Sarit's suggestions - she is an expert.

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here's what i've found for myself. support is key. controlling expiration is key. the effort factor must be below in the lower core.

once one is strong enough to apply support, (in varying degrees) the throat becomes the equivalent of a passive, hollow, resonating cylinder. all of it, the jaw, the tongue all seem to relax, due to the transference of energy below.

depending on what you are singing, and sometimes depending on the voice size, support is more physically demanding then we may realize.

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Hello Shrike123311. This means , following on from the information you do not make use of support system . once you will learn how you can your current your system to compliment your current vocal you should have manage upon nearly all seem you could possibly make. That is certainly almost all count additionally in some other facet, however Assist.

it is possible to please take a loot with the previous submit that a person requested. My partner and i wrote some thing about it way too in order to read. If you want more support, make me aware! :) all the best . . (this is a prolonged one , therefore i are copying it for you) individuals workouts may well provide you with a hands also. )

"

Hi there Deborah. starr. I can present you with some insight relating to your publish. do not consider your current belly but on your own low back. I've found the idea considerably more valuable over time that will assist operating starting making use of the again muscles instead of centering on your tummy will give you a lot more charge of the singing plus more electrical power way too. I will provide you with number of exercises to attempt, in case you please.

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Hi there Deborah. starr. I can present you with some insight relating to your publish. do not consider your current belly but on your own low back. I've found the idea considerably more valuable over time that will assist operating starting making use of the again muscles instead of centering on your tummy will give you a lot more charge of the singing plus more electrical power way too. I will provide you with number of exercises to attempt, in case you please.

Deborah? The D stands for Deff. Deff Starr.

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A bearing down feeling or more just flexing the abs downwards as well as the lower back engaged?

it all depends on what you are singing.....it's so hard to articulate support. i am studying "appoggio" support. this is a type of support that makes possible one register singing. it is very physical and requires a lot of lower core conditioning.

if you want to watch this series of videos (you have to watch them one-by-one because each one builds off the other), you may learn from this series....here's the link to 1 or 7. bear in mind, this is for classical singers, but can be applied to other genres as well.

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So what I gather is:

1. The ribs must stay expanded

2. The chest must feel suspended

3. The breath is low in the abs and lower back

4. The air is metered with the abs. Pressure must be varied.

Am I right?

I just never see many people using this technique though, guess it's because you said it's more a Classical technique.

Like modern day singers because they move more on the stage this technique would be hard to use. I guess it would be different in the studio though.

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basically yes. it all depends on what notes you're singing, with what intensity you're singing them, what you might wish to convey with your voice ...plus other factors.

if you're just crooning for example, you won't use anywhere near as much support as when you're singing a rock anthem.

but believe me, you won't always see support, but you best believe it's being used by top vocalists.

check out part 3...listen to how the student describes his sensations.

it's the skill of support that's going to free up your throat, make you less inclined to push, and help you stay relaxed where you need to be relaxed.

the physical part of singing is the part you need to come to terms with.

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