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Woman, DON'T sing like a man

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Sarit_Aloni
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Hey! Just wanted to share... I have a choir of amateur... Every time we have new piece to do they are asking me Voice recordings of each of their parts... The trouble is after recording Baritone , Tenor and Bass my voice feels like train went over it... Although I do have a large rang (E3 - E5)

I hate the feeling on my throat after singing so low and for all the part...

I guess for now there is nothing to do about it because there is no other way making them study their parts.. (They don't like midi)... and I am not working with complicated programs that can do human voice... :o:| ANYWAY... gladly it is not often that we need to study something new..

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Are you a guy or a girl? E3 - E5 is only a 2 octave range and nowhere near the bottom end of a baritone, let alone bass. It sounds like you're forcing these low sounds, which is not healthy at all. If you need to sing these parts, you need to sing them at a pitch comfortable for you and let them drop/raise the octave accordingly.

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Nop--I was probably mistaken with the scale range.... (I don't use much those definitions) I am a soprano.. and I probably meant till E6...(from E3)...

(3 octaves) But you are right I shouldn't sing those staff for them... I will record it next time in another scale. Thanks!

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Why not sing them an octave or two higher?

You might want to re-read the original post. She has to sing all the parts to be recorded so that the other members of the choir have something to learn their parts. Basically, scratch tracks for training purposes. So, the key is to sing the part and let a studio whiz transpose it down.

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You might want to re-read the original post. She has to sing all the parts to be recorded so that the other members of the choir have something to learn their parts. Basically, scratch tracks for training purposes. So, the key is to sing the part and let a studio whiz transpose it down.

Yeah.. I did it in the past already but I think I should continue with that again... :) Thanks guy for the support...:)

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Sarit - you've got fantastic technique! Can you actually sing low enough for the baritone and bass parts? If so, maybe it is just a matter practicing down there with the right technique to get used to it? Not that I'm a big fan of Brett Manning, but he has trained himself to go super low, in a healthy way. If you can actually go that low, there is probably a way to do it healthy.

Can you post an example of you trying to sing down there? Your voice is so good that it would be kind of fun to hear what you do down in that range. ;)

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Hey Guitartrek! By the way , Do you have a name ?

Here are the examples :lol:

(It is not a concert recording.. just singing for the choir members ...)

(those recording are after I transposed everything 1 Tone Up... it should have been even lower.. (at first I recorded that that LOW.. GOSH)

And for your suggestion... I will have to prefer the solution of singer HIGHER next time.. I really tired my voice that day I recorded those staff..

There is nothing to do.. If you were born a Soprano (woman) NOTHING will change me into BASS :D

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Sarit - I listened to the bass part - the low note was F3. When you say 1 Tone up, do you mean 1 whole step? or 1 Octave? Anyway it sounds really good as it is and will be great for your choir. My name is Geno (in italian you would pronounce Gino);)

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Ah - now you're testing my Italian.:| I took one year of Italian when I was a voice major in college, but have forgot most of it.:( My italian business partners wish that I would learn it again. Me too. It would be very helpful.

Ciao

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I learn something new every day. With a name like Geno, I thought you were probably south american. With your standard background in your avatar, it's hard to tell if it was a brazilian rainforest or the backwoods the U.P., Wisconsin. I guess, now, I can get rid of imagining you with an accent and speaking a european version of spanish.

Now, I've got to rearrange your accent in my head. I've had friends that came from Michigan. And, of course, Uncle Ted was from Michigan. Now, he lives in Crawford, Texas, literally down the road from Pres. Bush's ranch house.

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Ron - It's funny the impressions we get from others on the forum. I'm just a boring mid-westerner up here in south east Wisconsin. Born in Kansas, but grew up in Wisconsin. I've got a standard midwestern accent, which is pretty much bland american english.

We do a lot of business in michigan and I know a lot of people over there accross the pond. Their accent is very similar to ours, but our leans towards the funny northern Minnesotta type accent. Remember the movie Fargo? It's not as bad as that, but toward that.

That picture in my avatar was taken last summer in our back yard, our house is kind of in the middle of a forest.

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I remember "Fargo," yeah. It was a good movie, yeah. (the actress' name was Frances Dormand? It also had Steve Buscemi.)

My accent is weird. I was born in Los Angeles, California. We moved to Texas when I was 10.5 years old, October 1974. My brother was also born in L.A. A couple of decades ago, he had a job that had him travelling all over the place. He got married and moved to New Hampshire. Then, later, to Maine.

I've stayed in Texas. But there are natives here who can tell I was not born in Texas. Especially if I am speaking clearly and perhaps a little fast. Then, I lose the "drawl" and the West Coast becomes more apparent.

Which is funny because when I sing "Highway to Hell," I think I sound like a hick. When I was studying German in high school, our teacher had a deep southern accent, which threw me off. Luckily, listening to audio tapes and having a west coast root to my voice, I can achieve whatever accent by listening to it.

I learned Spanish on the job and from my first wife. So, it amazes mexican guys that I can speak Spanish with a mexican accent. They are used to gringos speaking Spanish and still sounding like "Bubba." I guess that would be redneckspanol. And there is a version of spanish here called Tex-Mex. Some english words take one a spanish gender ending. And some gringo phrases get translated into Spanish. For example, the texmex phrase, no bueno por caca. (by the way, that is not profanity in Spanish but the English translation is profanity, so I will not translate.) In real spanish and mexican spanish, you would not use a noun as an adverb, like we do in american English.

Some words get shortened, especially from the castillian Spanish in Spain and some south american countries. The word malissimo means bad. In Mexican and TexMex, it is shortened to mala and the phrase, mala jente, means bad person.

I had a crew that had 4 guys from Mexico and one from Honduras. And I could hear the difference in how he spoke Spanish (a bit more european.) And they were impressed. Most gringos don't know and don't care.

Anyway, neat to learn these things about each other.

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Moreso, I even felt more like a hick when I got to meet Ted Nugent.

He was at the Borders (bookstore) in Dallas at Lovers Lane and Greenville Avenue to do a booksigning. I really sounded like hick when I was speaking to him. I have autographed copies of his two biggest books that I know of.

"God, Guns, and Rock and Roll.

And his cookbook, "Kill it and grill it!"

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