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Problem with Head Voice/Vocal Closure

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NotSansReason
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I'm fairly new to singing (or am new to taking it more seriously). I also sing bass, if it's relevant. When I practice going into my head voice and work on the adduction of my vocal cords, it gets a weird buzzing sound like they don't want to zip up. Also, it has a higher, almost nasally sound compared to chest. Am I forcing something/doing something wrong/using the wrong part of my throat... or is this normal when beginning to learn. I'm down for a lot of practicing for a long time, I just don't want to be practicing bad habits.

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The nasal sound will go away. Just remember, you are using nasal resonance, but not singing through the nose.

And there is a limit to how close the folds can adduct. Functionally that is reached at lower pitches, where the cartileges of the TA get as physically close as they can get. As you go higher and the air pressure grows more concentrated, there will be a point where the folds can no longer hold that adduction and blow apart, releasing the strain in the TA's. That is why you should bridge early into head voice, which will sound nasal at first.

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I'm fairly new to singing (or am new to taking it more seriously). I also sing bass, if it's relevant. When I practice going into my head voice and work on the adduction of my vocal cords, it gets a weird buzzing sound like they don't want to zip up. Also, it has a higher, almost nasally sound compared to chest. Am I forcing something/doing something wrong/using the wrong part of my throat... or is this normal when beginning to learn. I'm down for a lot of practicing for a long time, I just don't want to be practicing bad habits.

NotSansReason: Please, post a little recording, so we can hear the buzz you are mentioning. It will be a big help. Some kinds of buzz are perfectly natural and appropriate.

As to the "don't want to zip up"... you can drop that expectation from your consideration. The pitch-control mechanism of the voice does not rely on this at all. Even its originator, Seth Riggs, uses the term now as imagery... as an idea, rather than proposing that it happens actually.

I hope this helps.

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