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Vocal range

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Someone posted a link to this range finder http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IejHKpfHso. I've tried it several different ways but am unsure of the correct way to test your range. It says to sing along but what does that mean? Sing? Hum? Just vocalize? I tried several methods but each has different results. Plus I'm unsure if it's ok to go from chest to head during this or to just stay in one area. Ok....I'm ignorant here:D duh!

I settled on "mum." I did Mum throughout and went from chest to head and did it a few times to make sure.. I went E3 to C6. Can this be correct?

Tommy

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Someone posted a link to this range finder http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IejHKpfHso. I've tried it several different ways but am unsure of the correct way to test your range. It says to sing along but what does that mean? Sing? Hum? Just vocalize? I tried several methods but each has different results. Plus I'm unsure if it's ok to go from chest to head during this or to just stay in one area. Ok....I'm ignorant here:D duh!

I settled on "mum." I did Mum throughout and went from chest to head and did it a few times to make sure.. I went E3 to C6. Can this be correct?

Tommy

Sounds like my range, though I only do a C6 if I am really relaxed. Normally, I describe my usable range without microphone as E3 to Bb5, just below C6.

And yes, you should be moving from chest to head as you ascend the scale. But chest and head are misnomers, anyway. The describe sensations rather than actual places. You cannot resonate in your lungs for "chest." The lungs are a wet, spongy bag that is deflating as you sing, there be reducing an "resonance cavity" they could be. What people feel is sympathetic vibration in the clavicle. Just as people feel Sympathetic vibration in head regions for higher notes. But, essentially, yes, your voice should be getting lighter and "smaller" even as it is resonating brightly and producing good volume.

In my opinion.

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Yea, that E3 is pretty low and although I can make the note I think it would be worthless as far as me actually singing there . Same for C6. At least at this point. But I can hit the notes without straining.

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Yeah, if I lower my larynx and give it some oomph, I can do a passable C3. Otherwise, my speaking voice at normal volume seems to hover between C3 and E3. But anything below that is greatly reduced in volume. Fry, which is the lowest vocalization, where the folds are barely making approximation to make a sound, for me is about G2 and I have to be right on the mic for you to hear it. At F#2, my folds have separated and all I can do is a throaty growl, sort of.

But as long as I maintain E3 to Bb5 strongly, I will be happy. Most of the songs I care to sing are within that part of the range. And mostly in the 4th and fth octave. I won't ever have a 4 or 5 octave range and have come to terms with my limitations.

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