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Can a Male Baritone Go Past G4? Please Help! :)

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Em... no, the coaches were telling me at first that I was a baritone.. when I was maturing. Though now I am sure that I am not. And yeah, sometimes it was hard believing that I was a tenor, but as I grew up, my voice entirely opened as a tenorish voice:) and I like it. So as I promised, I will post some of the songs that I mentioned, they are all from live.

So what do you think about the voice though, or the performances heard? Were they that bad or.. ?

and do you agree with the fact that Im a tenor. I am called a lyric tenor now (you wil listen to the new videos I will post soon).

Now, I am confused. I guess I misunderstood. Anyway, don't care, bygones. You are not a baritone as far as I can tell. Having some good notes in the 3rd octave does not a baritone make. Even being able to extend or grunt down to a B2 or an A2 on a day full of allergies doesn't make you baritone, in my opinion. My opinion and $1.70 USD will get you a 16.9 oz Diet Coke.

Your voice is fine. I don't know what you think was bad about it, unless you are fishing for compliments, as if the applause of a live audience was not good enough. And I know about that, too. I have sang live for real people in person more than I have recorded and usually received applause yet I stay here looking for validation, too. It's a neurosis, probably. :lol:

Actaully, I stay because I like helping in my own redneck way, if I can.

Yes, you are a tenor, though I think more dramatic than lyric. Of course, I have only myself to compare to. I am a light tenor, something like a spinto or leggiero, if I were to sing opera.

A coach who helped me typed me as a light tenor and suggested I drift away from the rock music and more toward classical and theater. But "I know, it's only rock and roll but I like it." So, I haven't followed all of his advice as far as repertoire and genre go. But he was a champ on breathing, though.

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Well yeas, I just showed those late earlier examples like when I was 16 (the sensible robber), and the church performance, after that at 17 I did the song I posted (that you said that I was quite good :) :) thanks for that). Now Im 19 and Im really a lyric tenor, I sometimes, like you, desire to have that lower sounding, even pretend to talk sometimes graspy, lower.. but I find it silly now, and I don't care, the voice sounds pretty god damn good.:)) haha

So, you stuck with the rock stuff? What are you singing? which performer and stuff? Interesting to hear what type of rock would a light tenor like you select! Maybe some DT stuff ? or Guns and Roses?

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Well yeas, I just showed those late earlier examples like when I was 16 (the sensible robber), and the church performance, after that at 17 I did the song I posted (that you said that I was quite good :) :) thanks for that). Now Im 19 and Im really a lyric tenor, I sometimes, like you, desire to have that lower sounding, even pretend to talk sometimes graspy, lower.. but I find it silly now, and I don't care, the voice sounds pretty god damn good.:)) haha

So, you stuck with the rock stuff? What are you singing? which performer and stuff? Interesting to hear what type of rock would a light tenor like you select! Maybe some DT stuff ? or Guns and Roses?

I've covered a number of different songs but when I look back at the list of song files I have, probably at least half of the covers I have posted are Led Zeppelin.

I do NOT sound like Robert Plant. But I enjoy the music so much and I try to capture the emotional feel and intention that he has.

And a wide range of other stuff. I admire Guns and Roses and Axl Rose's singing inspired me to improve my own. For the love of all that is holy, do not assume that I try to sound like Axl Rose or that he is the penultimate for me. He was inspiring, as are other singers. It has always been my goal to sound like Ron. And if anything, to see what other singers sound like me. Is that egocentric? Then I must be a singer. :lol::lol:

I have ranged from calypso to rock to country. A few stabs at heavy metal but the heavy metal audience can be so unforgiving, with a sound ideal as rigid as any of opera. At least as it has been my experience. There is not as much allowance for rubato and syncopation.

Or, I'm just a crappy singer when it comes to heavy metal.

But 70's hard rock? I'm all over that. Even when I write a song, someone will say, that sounds like a balladic love song from the 70's. Ah, my work is done.

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A coach who helped me typed me as a light tenor and suggested I drift away from the rock music and more toward classical and theater. But "I know, it's only rock and roll but I like it." So, I haven't followed all of his advice as far as repertoire and genre go. But he was a champ on breathing, though.

Reminds me of how Neal Schon and Gregg Rollie didn't like Steve Perry's voice when they heard his demo tape for the first time. I think Gregg said something to the effect of, "he was a crooner and we wanted a screamer." Anybody who tells someone they don't have a voice for rock and roll fails to understand that the rules of rock and roll: there are no rules.

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Exactly. And some more useless trivia from the mind of ronws. Journey started as kind of a prog band, more into instrumentals. And young manager trying to make his mark by the name of Doc MgGee came along and said you need a singer. And they were wanting, yes, something of a screamer, a dramatic heavy metal kind of guy. And Doc brought them crooner Steve Perry.

A decision so wise that they toured for 15 years, nearly non-stop, a number of plat and multi-plat albums, especially the break-out album, Escape. And that is what wore Steve out.

"They say that the road ain't no place to start a family." A true statement.

As for no rules in rock, amen. Rik Emmett has a clean, high voice and it never stopped him from singing rock.

Tony Iommi remembered fellow bandmate John Robert Osbourne from grade school and thought he could not sing.

Another band, from Ireland, put out an ad for a singer. And a guy named Paul Hewson showed up. Scratchy, raspy voice and falsetto for high notes. But it worked out well.

And then there's that little ole band from Down Under. A singer with less than 2 octaves of range and no training. And an affinity for scotch. Or a pint of ale, whatever's handy. Fortunately, they got Mutt Lange to produce one of their albums.

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I was a baritone , but I can sing upto B4. So in time you go above being a baritone into Tenor ish... at least that's for me.

That being said, I try to keep the songs I write in G4 or A4 at highest.

Hope this helps a little.

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Saijinkai -

Dude, Baritone is a voice TYPE, it doesn't denote a person's range or highest note.. There are plenty of Baritones who can sing a C5 or even an E5!!!

Baritone / Tenor etc refer to the quality of the sound of your voice. People often confuse the two things.

Hope this helps :-)

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Hooo interesting. My vocal teacher always told me Baritone usually reaches a certain range.

I'll ask her next time.

At least you went to a voice teacher, something we're all supposed to do. I would listen to a voice teacher if I was paying them money.

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I had 2 teacher which told me I'm a tenor but my voice is dark... I flip into mix around F4 and I can Sing high notes only with mix voice (I started study my voice 6 months ago). I want try opera in the future (I'm 23) but I don't know if I'm a true tenor... 

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