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Head voice remove feelings?

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When emulating high pitch songs, e.g. Beatles, some of my song's feelings disappear, because:

My voice isn't a natural tenor, and in creating a high pitched tone, I have to remove some bass by going into a head voice. It's necessary to remove bass because otherwise the singing doesn't match the instruments (a full vocal sound doesn't cut it in many of these). Yet, by removing the bass and going into head voice, I'm also removing a lot of the emotions created by the lower tract.

This is true even if it's a shouting high; but not if it's a natural emotive shouting high. For example, Little Anthony's song Hurt So Bad's high "Hurt So Bad" phrase can be created with a emotive shouting high using a lot of head voice, because it's an emotive cry that a head voice is naturally suited for.

I've never really understood the emphasis in this forum on breaks and upper registers, because I always felt the aim should be a full vocal sound.

What has been your experience? When going into a head sound, are the feelings behind the lower vocal tract being removed (except when the head sound is a natural emotive high)?

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When emulating high pitch songs, e.g. Beatles, some of my song's feelings disappear, because:

My voice isn't a natural tenor, and in creating a high pitched tone, I have to remove some bass by going into a head voice. It's necessary to remove bass because otherwise the singing doesn't match the instruments (a full vocal sound doesn't cut it in many of these). Yet, by removing the bass and going into head voice, I'm also removing a lot of the emotions created by the lower tract.

This is true even if it's a shouting high; but not if it's a natural emotive shouting high. For example, Little Anthony's song Hurt So Bad's high "Hurt So Bad" phrase can be created with a emotive shouting high using a lot of head voice, because it's an emotive cry that a head voice is naturally suited for.

I've never really understood the emphasis in this forum on breaks and upper registers, because I always felt the aim should be a full vocal sound.

What has been your experience? When going into a head sound, are the feelings behind the lower vocal tract being removed (except when the head sound is a natural emotive high)?

oh boy, do i understand your post!!

first of all, singing beatles' songs is much harder than it sounds because the singers had a thin, lyric quality and lighter weight and the range is pretty high for most of their material. the songs sit high too..(a high tessitura) meaning you don't get to come down off the highs as much.

same with guys llike steve perry, bruno mars, mickey thomas, their voices are of a lighter weight. lighter weight voices have less discernble, less noticable changes between head and chest tones and they are inherantlly more agile and flexible...they can move in and out of head and chest musculature much more easily than a heavier weight singer can. however, they lack thickness and perform best up high.

if you are heavier weight voice, the thickness is very hard to shed because of the thickness of your vocal folds and all other physiological differences.

i posted a video comparison between the beatles and lou gramm singing "eight days a week." that video comparison probably helps you hear the differences.

there are also voices that need more air and power to sound well vs. other voices. some voices simply don't sound optimal until a certain intensity is reached, while others just float up into the stratoshere like nothing...like all they have is a head voice..but make no mistake about it...you cannot get a perfomance voice using only head musculature....

where was i...oh, okay, now if a big voiced heavier weight goes into predominately head voice without incorporating some chest musculature voice the tone will likely flounder...it needs a core underneath it.

but the tone inevitably will thicken..it's just the way the singer is built

examples of popular heavier weight voices:

jon secada

benny mardones

eddie money

chris cornell

rob grill

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Another example is Chris Cornell trying to sing Rage Against the Machine tracks while he was with Audioslave.. Some of them just sound SO different.. given the difference in his voice and the original vocalist (Zack).. He's still hitting the same notes, but the quality of sound is way different.

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Well, many a modern vocalist would like to sing rock songs, which are often written or sung in the tenor range. And there are few of us natural tenors who can't make the full emotive sound of baritone. We mutants need a place to hang out, this being it.

:lol:

Trip is on to something. And there are scientific treatise that point out how the feelings you feel are sympathetic vibration and not actually the note itself. But act as kind of a guide.

Doesn't matter. What matters is how the note sounds and you or anyone else feel about it.

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Is it possible that because your not comfortable using your head voice and used to speaking in your chest voice that you can't portray the emotions you want too.

I would say once you have mastered your head voice and developed a full and resonant tone without having to bring up the weight of your chest voice too high you may possibly find this changes. When I first started using my head voice it was thin and horrible and wispy but once i got it to 'ring' this changed everything and my feelings towards it!!!

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Is it possible that because your not comfortable using your head voice and used to speaking in your chest voice that you can't portray the emotions you want too.

I would say once you have mastered your head voice and developed a full and resonant tone without having to bring up the weight of your chest voice too high you may possibly find this changes. When I first started using my head voice it was thin and horrible and wispy but once i got it to 'ring' this changed everything and my feelings towards it!!!

yes, but gina wouldn't you agree that some degree of chest voice musculature found it's way into the tone?

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