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Some U2

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AchtungBaby
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For the first one, "Sometimes You Can't Make It On Your Own," is there something I'm missing about falsetto? Because it like, just doesn't come out.

On the second one, I was looking up the chords as I was doing it. Excuse the long pauses. Also excuse the mild profanity as most U2 is significantly too high for me, and I get frustrated.

http://www.soundclick.com/player/single_player.cfm?songid=11526683&q=hi

http://www.soundclick.com/player/single_player.cfm?songid=11526697&q=hi

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Your second song, "Kite," is closer to what Bono is doing. If you really listen to Bono sing, his highest notes are actually falsetto. He has a naturally raspy voice and doesn't do anything to get that effect. As for the force he puts in falsetto, you are close to it in "Kite." Whatever you were doing, do that some more.

The other thing I can hear is that your mouth is too closed. Open it just a little. And nasal resonance is good, singing through the nose, not so much. If you open your mouth a little, not much, and let the soft palate retract, you can take advantage of nasal resonance without sounding nasal.

Also, you are singing on the consonants. They are hard and you extend them too much. The "t" sound is harsher and longer than it should be, for example. The t sound should be a light touch and only for a split second. So, experiment with this; sing the vowel sound longer and end momentarily with the constant, such as t, d, whatever.

Instead of pursing your lips, let your lips relax. You've got a great tone and you need to let it out to the world.

Your tone is perfect for U2 music, whether you ever sound exactly like Paul Hewson or not. And you've got the feel, the melancholy. Even on their happy songs, they are sad. And you've got the right emotion in your voice for that.

Also remember that what you hear on the album has been recorded with professional gear and all kinds of processing chains. And then autotuned. And then tuned and compressed in mastering. Not because U2 needs it, but because that is what record companies do. On everything. So, the way you are singing is closer to the original than you think.

My tips are stylistic only. Kind of like if we were two karate kids trying to help each other and I said, "try doing that kick this way ..." And you either like it, or not. It works for you, or not.

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About falsetto that doesn't sound like falsetto, I did't even knkw you could do that. How is that different from head voice?

Well, we have had several threads. I have about 24 + books on singing. We have several coaches here. And the one thing everyone agrees on, almost without exception is that falsetto is not head voice. Falsetto is a tonal quality that most often occurs in the same part of the range normally reserved for head voice. But, and I repeat with the authority of pretty much everyone that has some knowledge about singing, FALSETTO IS NOT HEAD VOICE.

Sorry for sounding like I was shouting. Falsetto is a lack of resonance because the fundamental is not strong enough. And this is so because the folds are not adducting fully (coming close together) to have enough closed quotient (time closed versus time apart) to qualify as a full voice note. That being said, there are singers, such as myself, that sing a full voice note that sounds "light," mainly because of the construction of my folds as caused by the genetics "gifted" to me at conception. It literally is a roll of the dice. If I had to describe myself, I am a lyric tenor, though I had sometimes thought of myself as leggiero because I can get a really light tone. But I sing it so loud, that it is probably more lyrical. But I digress.

Anyway, something to work on is the flexibility to transition between falsetto and full voice. Practice messa di voce. This is going from low volume to high volume on one note and back again. At the same time, you may find yourself adjusting resonance as you do this, which is fine. For volume actually comes from resonance.

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I think I just have a termonology issue. Isn't head voice just singing from the head, as in without support, where as falsetto sounds like, not natural? I don't understand how to make falsetto sound normal. What I was doing on the high parts of "Kite," that's head voice, correct?

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Singing in head voice requires plenty of support, which is why you CANNOT sing like most people speak because in speaking, most people do not have the breath management going that is needed for singing. Yes, you were in head voice. Also, a clean note in head voice is NOT falsetto. You were resonating nicely. You were singing in a head voice more connected than Paul Hewson. He just has a raspier tone, even in his falsetto timbre.

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