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Thinning out too much?

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staticsound
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Hey guys, first time poster...longtime lurker.

My head voice notes seem to thin out too much. My G4-G#4 still sound chesty, but once I hit A4, there is a distinct change in timbre. My head voice gets too thin, IMO. Don't get me wrong, I'm bridging and connecting right, my head voice, I can take up to a E5 at the moment. But my A4-C5 sound thin like the higher head voice notes. Hope I'm making sense...any tips are appreciated. Thanks

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Maybe it just sounds "thinner" in my head...idk. I hear people like David Cook or the god himself Cornell, and their upper mid register just sounds so beefier? Anyways, here's a simple A#3-A#4 siren...still sounds thin to me. Pardon my siren...allergies are killing me at the moment, so I got a little phlegm rattle thing goin on on the top note.

http://picosong.com/wRGt/

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True that. Thanks for the feedback! That's my issue is adding weight, if I try I end up pulling too much chest up. I guess I need to figure out how to add some more chest overtones without actually pulling up chest. Ugh...this never ending quest that is voice, lol

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Yo man I really feel where you're at... it takes a long time to develop a voice that you can compare to someone like Cornell's. In the meantime, my honest advice would be to punch your weight. If the first place you feel uncertain of is your A4, I'd guess you have at least 1.5 functional octaves below that. If I were you, I would put all my energy into making those notes sounds PERFECT and allow the higher and lower notes to come naturally. There's a chance that that's contrary to Frisell's wisdom, but it's made me money every week for a long time. In my opinion, slugging away at an A4 is nothing short of hubris unless you've got an E4 (at every volume) that sounds like the singing you love.

I get what you're saying about lower notes and I agree, especially the passaggio area. E4 is not a problem, I can sing that in really any style I want. It's not that I'm uncertain about the high A...I know I can hit it. My uncertainty lies in if it's believable as a chest belt. I've been able to thicken up my mid register up to a G4 to where it's essentially head voice, but still has the chest overtones. A4-C5 is where I need to get a more ballsy sound...

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it will come in time.

you'll be able to apply more umph when you learn to "aim" a more intensely supported breath tension right into the most vocally correct resonator.

then the note will ring and ping like there's no tomorrow. it comes over time and experimentation. you'll begin to sense where the breath tension needs to go.

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Yeah, right now it's mainly resonating in the mask area. The reason I even brought this thread up is I recently had a Skype session with Jamie Vendera and he told me I was thinning out too much. So now it's mental thing with me, lol.

Any tips on how to "aim" as you put it, Video?

Bty, Tamplin seems to be fan of carrying chest voice up and bridging later. By his videos, I like what I hear...and is really the style I want. Problem is now, I'm trying to build my chest voice back up. I used to be able to hit a B4 in full chest, and ever since I started the whole "bridge early thing"...going on 3 years now, I'm having a hard time retraining myself.

Just from practice, I can pretty much spot where a singer is placing his/her notes, and to my ears, Layne Staley is nailing that A# in full on chest...

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Rusty - man you are doing it right - it sounds awsome. You are not too heady at all. You are very well connected and I think you've got TA engaged just the right amount. Internally you are feeling lighter because you've entered into head voice at about Ab4 / A4 where you are relinquishing control to your CT muscle. This will always "feel" lighter internally. And then you associate that feeling to when you hear yourself on playback. It's a mind game that you are playing with yourself. Beleive me - you are not sounding lighter on the outside.

When I was developing head voice I had the same exact worries. I was actually too heavy up in that area for fear that I was getting too thin. Then training with Tamplin's videos I noticed that I was getting the exact same weight as him, and I finally accepted that I was doing it right.

If you really want to add more heaviness you could practice CVT's overdrive - but that is vowel dependent. Only two overdrive vowels work up in that area. This will be very loud and very powerful.

You can also always add a little more TA in that area if you want more beef. You've got to support very very well while doing this.

I think for the most part you've got to give yourself more credit and disassociate the feeling you're getting from the sound you are creating.

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i believe it's technically called formant tuning, but i'm not too technical in my approach to training...i'm more of a sense and feel kind of guy....lol!!!!

you see how you went up on that siren? nice and clean? well, there are other ways to sound up there by (now this is hard to explain) arcing the vocal tract just a little so that the pressurized air feels like it's between the eyes.

imagine if the nose was not on your face, depending on the vowel and the note i sometimes aim in this area. not intending to be nasal, not at all. but when you access this area and you are well supported, the tone, the ring, that can come out is really nice and resonant. you have to be right on the money because if you're off, you can tell by sensing the air tension as blocked rather than channeled and released.

it was a discovery, after a long time. believe me, i'm sure there's others that can explain it better or more technically than i can.

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