Jump to content

Voice higher in pitch when inhaling air

Rate this topic


Ivenado
 Share

Recommended Posts

But I was wondering why it happens this way ? Does it means that I could sing as high the other way around or since the air pushes the air the other way, the vocal cords vibrate differently ?. I am a novice into the field so I am just trying to understand what is happening.

Thank you, now I know that it wasn't my imagination.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good question. :) My guess is one of two things. First, it is good support (or precise metering of air) that makes it easy to do those high notes.

My speculations:

1. It is easier to support finely metered air needed up high in reverse.

2. It is harder to support finely metered air in regular phonation because of a lifetime of ingrained habits used in everyday speech. Hard to break old habits.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You mean by adding air will increase my support and that's why it gets easier singing the high notes. Sounds logic to me. But if I break the old habits like you said, means that I could actually reach the same notes with a proper technique.

Well for me it sounds right,

Thanh you

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i really wouldn't really put too much stock in this, nor would i devote too much time on this. you're better off practising gentle, coordinated onsets and light connected tones.

lip bubbles, singing through a straw are better ways to go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i really wouldn't really put too much stock in this, nor would i devote too much time on this. you're better off practising gentle, coordinated onsets and light connected tones.

lip bubbles, singing through a straw are better ways to go.

I agree, you are much better off practicing your "normal" (for lack of a better word) range. You won't need those super high notes for most songs, but they sure don't hurt.

Back to topic. Has anybody actually practiced "reverse phonation" and could tell us more about it?

I've only tried a couple of times for fun... But it seems like an interesting subject. :)

Nick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first time I saw it was by Bret Manning and he was trying to show how to get the feel for whistle voice. I don't find a lot of value in whistle voice, but it is always cool to play around with different sounds. Sometimes that leads to new insights on other parts of your voice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is what I have got from a medical website: Only use for medical phonetique problems.

RESULT: there were reports of significant changes in vocal treatment during with the use of reverse phonation: ventricular distention, ventricular folds separation, increase in the fundamental frequency, mucous wave inverse movement; and it also facilitates the dynamic study of the larynx when associated with endoscopy, making it possible to have a better definition of lesion localization in vocal folds superficial lamina propria layers.

CONCLUSION:

There are few studies describing larynx behavior during reverse phonation and, for this technique to be used in a more precise and objective way, more studies are necessary in order to prove its effectiveness in practical matters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...