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English opera arias ?

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Chavie
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ive been really getting into opera but only speak English....

Until i learn Italian what are some good opera arias to practice?

the closest ive come is phantom of the opera but .....thats not really opera is it?

thanks in advance.

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Chavie - I think its a great idea to practice Arias. I've got one that I continue to work on from Puccini. It is in Italian though - I don't speak Italian, but I wouldn't let that be a deterrant. The italian language is fantastic for singing - and it is super easy. With english there are so many pronunciations of vowels and words. With Italian - it is pure. Every vowel has a specific pronunciation. They don't have all the exceptions we have in english. What I did is download the sheet music off the internet, and then downloaded different singers performances. I started with Pavarotti - and I just emulated his exact pronuciation. I'm now working on a Bergonzi version.

Listening to and emulating the actual opera singers really helps transfer over the technique. You automatically start supporting correctly because there is no other way to do it. If I first practice an Aria, my technique right there for a rock song. I'll even do an Aria before a recording session for a rock song just to get everything working well and loose.

I'd recommend any of the Puccini Arias only because I really like Puccini's music.

If you want to stick with English songs - yeah Phantom is great. Ever watch this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZjsIZl9zrM

geno

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Can't help you much with english arias. However, one with some good vowel use like Geno is talking about is a standard that some tenors does at some point, either in school work or professionally, "Nessun Dorma." I would like to do that song, though I will sound nothing like, for example, Russell Watson, and certainly not Pavarotti. I would end up sounding more like Glen Hughes, which is not such a bad thing. At least, in my book. Though it would not fly well in classical circles. "Sacrilege!"

That's me, profane and urbane. Driving on the center of the asphalt on the highway to Hell...

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from abrsm;

Grade 2 - relatively simple Ita/Eng Trad. - Italian/T. Cottrau Santa Lucia. - Italian Songs & Arias (Mel Bay)

Grade 3 - Denza Funiculì, funiculà (A Merry Life).Italian Songs & Arias (Mel Bay) (Ital/Eng)

Grade 4 - Giordani Caro mio ben (Dearest and best/Ah dearest love).The Language of Song: Elementary (high or low) (Faber)

Once you start getting into Grade 4 - there is more Ital available.

May want to consider Folk too,

Grade 2 - Trad. Italian Ma bella bimba (How beautiful, the ballerina). G (b–B): arr. Moore. No. 7 from Ready to Sing...Folk Songs

Get a good translation - most of above have eng/ital, so easy to understand - AND you can sing them in BOTH / EITHER English and / or ital. It is a stipulation for ABRSM that Grade 6 and above has to be original language, but before that grade you can sing in english if you want, and language / phrasing / leaps get more complicated throughout the grades. Adjust octave accordingly (keeping key obviously).

Personally - I think you should sing Latin / Italian / German / French ... etc, but "some" of the translations do get a little "lost", but purely for musical flow's sake. So even from an early age singers get to sing in 5 or so languages too (which I think if FAB), so start English to French, to Latin to German to Italian (as the grades go up).

Enjoy.

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ive been really getting into opera but only speak English....

Until i learn Italian what are some good opera arias to practice?

the closest ive come is phantom of the opera but .....thats not really opera is it?

thanks in advance.

Chavie: There are some perfectly workable English translations of opera arias from other languages, but (gasp) there are also arias in English-language operas as well.

Here is a place to start: GF Handel: 'Where E're You Walk' from Semele.

Arias in 'Messiah' by the same composer are written in the same style, so are equally valuable. For tenor, I recommend 'Comfort ye, my people'.

A google search for 'Opera arias in English' will get you much useful info. Try it.

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