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Building middle voice question. Please help!

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Tenorabe
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It seems like I kinda learned mixed voice with an airy light voice that I cant push just a lot of air through with. And have just sung that way for quite some time when i get up in the tenor range. Lately I have noticed i can push a little bit more from my stomach and somehow put an edge to my voice that makes it sound quite a bit more chesty. And also it feels like way less air is coming through my cords. I can holds notes longer with more power. Thats really the only way i know how to describe it. Is this correct? Does anyone know what i mean? Any help is appreciated! But please dont make me feel like an 8 year old who has already damaged his voice for life. LOL!

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Sounds like you are getting a better grasp on the notes. Your semi-cord closure seems pretty impressive.

The tone is irrelevant to what your are singing. While air flow is important in projecting your voice, there's a dark-side to it as well, because if you push too hard with your air, your are gonna tighten up your muscles at the high notes.

The volume seems suitable, so i recommend you do that scale, just slowed down between the notes, and try to sustain the notes longer.

And again, I'm not sure what you mean by middle voice. Middle in music terms is the quality of sound between bass and treble. So in non-classical terms, you want to address your mixed/blend voice above your head voice?

At any rate, you want to focus on building the ability to sing your notes with proper air flow, but not so much that you are pushing with your throat.

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It seems like I kinda learned mixed voice with an airy light voice that I cant push just a lot of air through with. And have just sung that way for quite some time when i get up in the tenor range. Lately I have noticed i can push a little bit more from my stomach and somehow put an edge to my voice that makes it sound quite a bit more chesty. And also it feels like way less air is coming through my cords. I can holds notes longer with more power. Thats really the only way i know how to describe it. Is this correct? Does anyone know what i mean? Any help is appreciated! But please dont make me feel like an 8 year old who has already damaged his voice for life. LOL!

Tenorabe: You have lots of descriptions going here, so its difficult to identify the item for your question 'Is this correct'?

That said, what you have described as 'like way less air', and 'hold notes longer' and 'with more power' are all good things. They indicate that you have brought your laryngeal muscle action into closer coordination with your breath.

Listening to your recording... using a D consonant at the beginning of each syllable builds up supraglottic pressure, which is a help for the onset. However, each sustained note is so short that its hard to hear how well you sustain the note after the onset. So, slow down the scale, and sustain each note for 1 or 2 seconds. That will help you (and us) assess how well you can sustain the tone. As another wrinkle, sing a single D onset, and then do the entire scale on the same vowel.... all the way up and down. That's a pretty good test of how well you make the note-to-note adjustments needed to transition the passaggio (bridge) area... the part of the voice which Love calls 'middle voice'.

Also, a fine point: Position your jaw and lips for the vowel you intend to open to, and then do the D consonant through that shape. That will allow the vowel to be consistent during the length of the note, from beginning to end.

I hope this is helpful. Keep up the good work.

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Thanks Steve...

Tenorabe, ... the first thing that comes to my mind is your talk-track is all screwed up. If you don't know the proper language of voice technique, the mind will never find itself out of confusion. First of all, we don't "push" or "hit" notes, we sing them... that along, is creating mental imagery and programming counter-productive to what you are trying to achieve, sing better. When you begin to think in terms of 'singing deep notes" as we do at TVS, you begin to understand that primitive inclinations to "hit" and "push" stuff is exactly what we are trying to get away from in the 'sport' of voice training. Bridging the passaggio has to deal with many factors Im not going to write about here because it would take too much time, however it is explained and demonstrated numerous times in my training system, "The Four Pillars of Singing 2.0"... but I will say this... singing high notes and eventually bridging the Passaggio has a lot to do with shifting formants and acoustics... which takes me to Steve's point...

The way you are phoning... is not productive. "Da, Da, Da, Da"... off pitch, shout-like (which is kind of Steve's point) is just putting your body into a primitive, shout response... further, these short bursts are not working any muscle memory or coordination for singing.. unless you want to work the muscle memory and coordination to shout harder and choke more on high notes.

Do you have any good training content? Do you have any REAL vocal workout scales from any books or DVD systems? If your going to get serious, you need training content and you need to train. Once you have that sorted out...

... you need to begin training onsets and sirens or other workouts on open vowels as Steve was recommending. You need to understand the components that are required to produce a high performance phonation for your singing, in TVS we call it the Phonation Package and TVS students become masters at command and control of their "Phonation Package"...

... I don't know, there is just a lot of issues here that can't be explained in a forum post... the short "hail Mary" tip I would give you is... work on slow and controlled sirens on an open "Eh" vowel and as you approach the vocal break... ignore the primitive instinct to shout at the high note and instead, lighten the mass of your phonation until you feel it bridge to a 'heady' position... do that in the shower, in the car, until your face turns blue.

Here is a video of me demonstrating a technique at TVS called, "lift up / pull back" that is great for beginners to help learn the coordination of bridging the passaggio and to stop shouting.

This video is a bit dated, but it has been popular. There is a new version of it on my DVD training system, "Pillars 2.0". Hope this helps.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8zroG9QWNc

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anyway you put it you have to build your voice from the ground up. I did not skip any steps. Like building a house. When you can reach that e4 perfect move on to the f when thats perfect move on to the f# and so on. This is the way they did it in the old school. No tricks no terms just feeling and soul and practice no shortcuts they will only bite you in the ass. I am willing to teach anyone this. Its very simple when you look at it this way its like weightlifting. Contact me and we could rap about it i'm a vocal nerd as well and I love to help. Goto my website and see who I've studied with. Way to many and when i just went back to the basics everything fell into place

Talk to ya soon

www.danielformicavocalstudio.com

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Gotcha

Tenorabe try this instead of singing a staccato scale take a phrase or a word something like "hallelujah"( very simple its worked for gospel singers since they were singing while they worked or (avemaria). Sing it on a five tone scale, sing it out nice and strong not yelling just confident. When it gets tough or feels like your gonna crack or break switch to and octave 4 tone scale on the top not and watch how it is much easier. Once you get that in tact(wont be overnite) go back to the five tone. Sing as high as you can and watch your voice grow. This is how you bulid the voice..

When you can reach that e4 perfect move on to the f when thats perfect move on to the f# and so on. This is the way they did it in the old school. No tricks no terms just feeling and soul and practice no shortcuts they will only bite you in the ass.

hope that helps.

daniel

www.danielformicavocalstudio.com

hit me up i'll give you examples over the phone or skype(no charge)

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Thanks for all the advice! You guys Rock! Now i have grown up singing strictly acappella harmony singing. I know shape note music which is probably foreighn to most on here. So i dont know exactly what you mean when you say e4. I have a Key of C pitchpipe that i use. And a Do on Gb is probably my highest money note you could say lol. Like take the pitch Gb on the pitch pipe and an octave up from that. Anything above that isnt real reliable. Daniel I love your way of taking it one note at a time. Makes perfect sense to me. I have always kinda practiced all the way up the scale and thot all the notes would gradually get stronger and more chesty sounding at the same time. Another handicap I have is i have a filter on my computer that blocks youtube videos so Im kinda outta luck there. And No im not at work LOL!

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