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defintion full voice

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rurokenji
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I'm not sure there is a modern scientific definition for that term, nor does it seem to have any clear connotation with it.

A full voice might refer to the projection of the voice or cord closure in the modal register. You have a vocal fry, modal, head, falsetto, and whistle register.

More importantly, it's also a good to understand that over projection of the voice will ruin resonance.

It's very critical that you get a correct understanding of what you are reading and how it properly translates into practice.

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Oh boy here we go . Well ask yourself the question when you start singing. Then you get to this place and you crack well if you build your voice correctly and are able to get to the notes you use to crack on but now you sing them from the same place as all the other notes and you haven't" switched gears, flipped ,cracked, you dont sound like Ethel Murman and you don't feel pain or really bad strain well guess what that's full voice. Period end of discussion

Daniel

Www.danielformicavocalstudio.com

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Full voice would be using thick fold technique. Where you have the sensation of chest voice. A fuller sound thats commited and then as you raise higher through the break using belt or twang to keep a full voice. I'm gonna do video on this soon so I'll keep you posted.

Check out my latest one

Sarah

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I kinda like Anthony Frisell's idea of full voice. The volume and resonance that we associate with chest voice, regardless of where the note actually is. In so many words, sort of, kind of.

I could be wrong.

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Depends on the context. I know the term as a reference for modal register. Glotal cycles involving the full body of the folds. Capable of full dynamic variation/control, and maximum tonal quality due to the production of overtones. Although the ballance of the movement changes as pitch rises, and more or less of the body of the folds is involved (as well as the cyclic motion) while the glotal cycle pattern remains the same, it remains modal or full.

Most human voices have at least 2 octaves of fully controlable notes withing this register WHEN fully trainned. Which is called tessitura.

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ALL TERMS ASIDE BECAUSE IT'S LIKE TRYING TO UNDERSTAND A DIFFERENT LANGUAGE. Did you at least understand my post. Trying to make it simple. Everyone on here had valid information but some harder to understand than others. I don't know where you are from I'm just trying to put it universal for ya..

Daniel

Www.danielformicavocalstudio.com

Ps

Guys I'm not trying to start any discussion or argument you guys are the best

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full voice singing occurs when the elements of head voice and chest voice musculature are both involved and engaged in the making of the tone. it is your performing voice.

as frisell says, head voice and chest voice will not develop into a performance voice without the two musculatures involved (in varying degrees, depending on the note, and the vowel) in the production of the tone.

this mixing of the voice is one of the most difficult aspects of singing. even great singers, performing greats, spend the rest of their lives tweaking and perfecting this one element.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I like to think of it as more of a continuum rather than whether or not the voice is "full". Fullness generally is defined by the amount of vocal fold mass that one is using.

I like to use a scale from 1 to 10. 1 being an extremely soft cry almost falsetto (but still having vocal fold closure) and 10 being a strained (not healthy) shout. Around 3-4 is about where I'd sing if I wanted the appropriate thickness to get through most of a contemporary pop or rock song and about 5-6 is about the amount of thickness required for Opera quality (since one needs to project that without amplification). 7-9 is belting and I consider that 9-10 area the point where I'm going from safe belting to straining.

But that's just a personal method I use. It depends on what you are singing and to some extent, how you want to define it.

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