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Singing Voice and Speaking Voice are the same.

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izzle1989
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I hate when people come to me with this common misconception that you either have it or you don't. They fail to realize that there so called "natural" singing idol has really put in years of hard work to become as proficient as they are today. The fact of the matter is that we are all built with basically the same anatomy, so we are all capable of doing anything someone else can do. If you can speak without any vocal limitations you should be able to sing with diligent practice of course. I think we as a singing community need to defeat this common misconception that you have to different voices a singing voice and a speaking voice when they are both created by the same vocal apparatus. I know this topic is going to be controversial, but it is fact and we need to stop looking at singing as some big "mystery"

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Yeah I know what your sayin. It doesnt pay to try to explain proper vocal technique to someone who doesnt care tho.. Sometime look up how how fanatical Journeys Arnel Pineda is about his voice. I read somewhere that he used to talk falsetto before a show to save his voice. Im not humble enough for that. LOl He is an INSANE singer tho!! AND DONT NO ONE TRY TO TELL ME HE WASNT AS GOOD AS STEVE PERRY!!!

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It is true that we use the same organs for speaking and singing. What differs is most people speak with the residual pressure of a relaxing diaphragm, good enough for a few words or a phrase. Not so much for singing. Do you speak with the same breath and coordination set up at, maybe C5 that you do speaking around B2 or C3, or wherever it is in the range that you normally speak?

As for doing something some one else can do, it depends. It usually won't sound the same. Everyone's structure is different. That's why our voices sound different. I think we can all make sound effects. I don' think they will all sound the same.

Can you sound like Axl Rose in one phrase and Michael Kiske in the next? Most people cannot. There are a few genetically blessed people who can. But even they will not sound just exactly like either name I mentioned.

There are also people, such as myself, (and I am self-serving in my own justification of this statement, deal with it, or not) who have a limited range. I have never had and will never have a 4 or 5 octave range. But I was also born 10 lbs 12 ounces. That has nothing to do with singing range. Just another accident of birth, so to speak.

It's also possible for two people who look totally dissimilar, from different parts of the world, even, to sound the same.

And any shade in between. Our own Keith is from New York and sounds like Geoff Tate, who is from the Pacific Northwest. One of Lunte's students who is also an instructor is Randy Loran from Austin, Texas. And sounds very much like Geoff Tate and could easily do the gig with Queensryche if Geoff was otherwise occupied.

I've seen people who are not even american and totally different body types sound like Axl Rose, who is from Indiana.

Finally, I don't think there is so much a dichotomy between speaking and singing voice in most people's minds. The misconception to overcome is that there is some magic pill that will make you sing well or sound like singer "x" or "y."

It takes a while to develope the coordination for singing, just as it takes a while to develope the coordination for golf or baseball. That being said, there are some who just have a natural gift of coordination. But it still took plenty practice to develope the natural ability into something reliable. Like Tiger Woods. He has been swinging a club ever since he could hold one. But it was many years of lessons and swinging clubs to become the phenomenon that he is.

And yes, this will engender a debate. Should be interesting.

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Yes and No.

The organs involved are the same. The overall movements used are the same.

However, other parts of your brain are involved, and the task is many times more demanding.

Singing is, in its essence, an activity that requires a high level of performance of all motor functions that take part on the process.

The nature of the activity is in itself an attempt to show more, become more, and better translate your ideas and feelings to others. To do it, even for fun or no professional objectives, will always result in emotional connection and an attempt to deliver the best you can.

The mechanical functions are the same, yes, if we disregard some usage differences. But the activity is on another plane of difficulty and demand for quality.

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It is true that we use the same organs for speaking and singing. What differs is most people speak with the residual pressure of a relaxing diaphragm, good enough for a few words or a phrase. Not so much for singing. Do you speak with the same breath and coordination set up at, maybe C5 that you do speaking around B2 or C3, or wherever it is in the range that you normally speak?

As for doing something some one else can do, it depends. It usually won't sound the same. Everyone's structure is different. That's why our voices sound different. I think we can all make sound effects. I don' think they will all sound the same.

Can you sound like Axl Rose in one phrase and Michael Kiske in the next? Most people cannot. There are a few genetically blessed people who can. But even they will not sound just exactly like either name I mentioned.

There are also people, such as myself, (and I am self-serving in my own justification of this statement, deal with it, or not) who have a limited range. I have never had and will never have a 4 or 5 octave range. But I was also born 10 lbs 12 ounces. That has nothing to do with singing range. Just another accident of birth, so to speak.

It's also possible for two people who look totally dissimilar, from different parts of the world, even, to sound the same.

And any shade in between. Our own Keith is from New York and sounds like Geoff Tate, who is from the Pacific Northwest. One of Lunte's students who is also an instructor is Randy Loran from Austin, Texas. And sounds very much like Geoff Tate and could easily do the gig with Queensryche if Geoff was otherwise occupied.

I've seen people who are not even american and totally different body types sound like Axl Rose, who is from Indiana.

Finally, I don't think there is so much a dichotomy between speaking and singing voice in most people's minds. The misconception to overcome is that there is some magic pill that will make you sing well or sound like singer "x" or "y."

It takes a while to develope the coordination for singing, just as it takes a while to develope the coordination for golf or baseball. That being said, there are some who just have a natural gift of coordination. But it still took plenty practice to develope the natural ability into something reliable. Like Tiger Woods. He has been swinging a club ever since he could hold one. But it was many years of lessons and swinging clubs to become the phenomenon that he is.

And yes, this will engender a debate. Should be interesting.

Very good statement, but I was saying that I can sound identical to someone else. What I'm saying is I know plenty of bass singers who can easily take head voice to C5 and up just as I know many sopranos that can sing in the 3rd octave.

Speaking is the simplest form of the skill of making sound. Singing is to speaking as walking is to sprinting if you train the correct way the central nervous system will adapt in the correct manner to build more strength and coordination within whatever muscle group being worked. I use to be a firm believer that singing was a natural talent, but now I see it as what it is..."A NATURAL TALENT FOR PEOPLE THAT LIKE TO SING" just like any other skill it is developed from practice.

Some of us may be faster learners or more naturally inclined to doing it, but we are all capable. What is talent really? Is it singing a super low/high note? Having a great vibrato? Being blessed with superior vocal agility? No it is hard work and dedication and trusting that our bodies will adapt to whatever we do. We are such amazing creatures who are capable of doing anything we put our minds to. I am a firm believer that we don't learn how to sing we train our muscles to sing.

I wouldn't go bench press 300 pounds without training for it, just like I wouldn't sing a C6 without training for it. We are all only using a small percentage of our voice...I believe we are all capable of singing whistle notes and we are all capable of singing lower than we would think...Of course we have physical limitations due to body type/shape and the sizes of our vocal folds, but if we train our muscles to be flexible by warming up and stretching them every day then range and tonal quality will have to improve.

Learning how to sing was not clear to me growing up and I would spend most of my time reading books, articles, ad anything else I could about learning how to sing but, you don't win a marathon by sitting on your as reading...You have to perform the act...SING SING SING! that's the answer which is sooooooo simple now.

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I know of only one bass singer that can do a C5. And that is Axl Rose. It's a very nasal C5.

Do you know of some other basses that can do that? I've heard it said often but I don't hear a lot of it. I don't doubt that it exists.

We have a person here who describes himself as a bass who can sing a C6, though I have not yet had the fortune to hear that.

I suppose it depends on who does the analyzing. Wikipedia said, at one time, that Geoff Tate's top note is an A5 (probably from Queen of the Ryche days) and I think he gets down to an F#2 or F2 on "Silent Lucidity." I know that whatever it is, it is beyond me. I think Geoff is a baritone with countertenor ability.

I like Axl's singing on "Shackler's Revenge" and I just can't sing the lead, which is bass.

As you point out, everyone's different. But there is no way that I know of to make the folds any thicker and larger than whatever genetics gifted a person. So, generally, there is a bottom end to a voice.

And I totally agree, paraphrasing, I think, that you can let your imagination guide you. To me, it doesn't feel like "work." I like to do what I do, whether others like it or not.

Emulation is a funny thing (brought up in another thread.) I knew a guy in high school who could squeal like a pig. I tried to do the same thing and came up with a wicked growl, instead. Sometimes, "mistakes" lead to interesting things.

Good luck, and may the Force be with you, always.

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singing and getting great at it should be construed as a lifelong journey, (ebb and flow) because while were out there training and studying and singing we are using a very tempermental, ever changing instrument.

i look at the voice now so much different since my polyp. it's not just something you sing and talk with, it's truly a wonderment of nature, a pet to take care of and let develop, nuture, and bloom.

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Singing is, in its essence, an activity that requires a high level of performance of all motor functions that take part on the process.

it may be that this applies to speaking too; the difference being, we all practice that for hours every single day and are thus all pretty expert at that

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it may be that this applies to speaking too; the difference being, we all practice that for hours every single day and are thus all pretty expert at that

ah, but matt, are we really experts in the mechanics of speaking? i truly believe my polyp came more from the way i improperly spoke and my misuse of the speaking voice than it did the singing voice.

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IMO the single most important thing in teaching people singing, is how the thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles sets work. If you don't know how they work, your more than likely to hit a wall somewhere in your practice.

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IMO the single most important thing in teaching people singing, is how the thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles sets work. If you don't know how they work, your more than likely to hit a wall somewhere in your practice.

Depends on who you study. Manuel Garcia II was all about the TA.

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Well I don't know anything about him D:. But what I gather, his research was geared towards balancing the vocal cords, lower register, and reinforcing 2cnd formant. Which to me is only half of the equation, because without the CT part, you are still unbalanced. I'm not an expert, but the concept of balancing both high and low is very practical to me.

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I know of only one bass singer that can do a C5. And that is Axl Rose. It's a very nasal C5.

Do you know of some other basses that can do that? I've heard it said often but I don't hear a lot of it. I don't doubt that it exists.

We have a person here who describes himself as a bass who can sing a C6, though I have not yet had the fortune to hear that.

I suppose it depends on who does the analyzing. Wikipedia said, at one time, that Geoff Tate's top note is an A5 (probably from Queen of the Ryche days) and I think he gets down to an F#2 or F2 on "Silent Lucidity." I know that whatever it is, it is beyond me. I think Geoff is a baritone with countertenor ability.

I like Axl's singing on "Shackler's Revenge" and I just can't sing the lead, which is bass.

As you point out, everyone's different. But there is no way that I know of to make the folds any thicker and larger than whatever genetics gifted a person. So, generally, there is a bottom end to a voice.

And I totally agree, paraphrasing, I think, that you can let your imagination guide you. To me, it doesn't feel like "work." I like to do what I do, whether others like it or not.

Emulation is a funny thing (brought up in another thread.) I knew a guy in high school who could squeal like a pig. I tried to do the same thing and came up with a wicked growl, instead. Sometimes, "mistakes" lead to interesting things.

Good luck, and may the Force be with you, always.

Thanks Ron and nice to meet u :)

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Well I don't know anything about him D:. But what I gather, his research was geared towards balancing the vocal cords, lower register, and reinforcing 2cnd formant. Which to me is only half of the equation, because without the CT part, you are still unbalanced. I'm not an expert, but the concept of balancing both high and low is very practical to me.

I am not an expert, either. I have been reading of the history of Bel Canto from an author who is an unabashed fan of Garcia's system and spent a few chapters going over Garcia's concentration on full adduction coup de la glotte, feeling that full fold involvement led to more harmonics being present than any lighter mass phonation.

So, like I was saying, it depends on which school of thougt you are following. Many is the traditional opera person who also follows the Garcia school of thought. Not me, mind you. I agree that CT will be involved, whether any particular teacher or coach thinks so, or not, to an extent. Unless the sound ideal one is following is heavily weight toward one or the other.

That is, I am not disagreeing with you, just pointing that one's perspective has an influence. Singing is mental.

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