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this may stir some pedagogy related controversy...

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srs7593
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We don't talk about falsetto much, not the way that I would like to anyway. I'm hoping that we can approach the consensus that this singer is using falsetto, similar to the way that King Diamond did/does. Now, my opinion is that there are moments where it sounds awesome and moments where it doesn't. But for whatever it means, I think it is a solid and legitimate technique. I think falsetto has it's place in metal music and I think it needs to be explored more. Another thing that I noticed is that it is much more difficult to discern falsetto from head voice in a live recording. I'm wondering to what degree singers who record tracks in "full" voice in the studio can get away with using falsetto at live shows.

I would like to segue into another thing...

I think his very highest notes are all falsetto. I get that feeling from most people who go up to C6. I've heard D6s from him on other tracks :o But these notes sound too hollow and easy to be sung in the same manner as say, E5-G5 for most of the folks that can do that. Most, (but not all) of his notes above E5 sound distinctively flutey, whereas others are razor sharp. This leads me to believe he can transition comfortably between a connected and disconnected head tone. Anyway, I think most of us can agree that this singer is off the chain.

In a way, because falsetto is much more naturally occurring and comes easier than head voice for most male singers, I believe it may have the potential to be highly expressive and useful. Even in the most dramatic context. I think the lack of vocal "weight" is somewhat irrelevant, given the fact that female sopranos are perfectly capable of singing expressively with very light voices. Granted, a soprano voice is very different from a man singing falsetto. But there is nothing freakish, unnatural, or inherently silly about falsetto. I think we've just made it that way.

You've gotta be sincere! You've gotta feel it here! Cause then you're gonna be honestly sincere!

During the Baroque period, as I understand, falsetto was used rather extensively. After the romantic era I guess people wouldn't settle for it anymore. They wanted to hear manly men shouting in manly voices. But I think there are ways to raise the bar with it. I haven't figured them out yet, but I think it is a shameful thing to put a good falsetto to waste. I can't possibly be the only person who thinks about this.

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ya it's important to realize it's natural, plus it does a ton of good for your upper registers. Sometimes I think it would be really amazing if there was classical music, where you mix the best of both worlds, by having the manly parts and falsetto parts all mixed together, instead of separating them.

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i think falsetto and headvoice are the same, headvoice = a trained falsetto wich can carry ta musculature

falsetto would just be the basic voicefunction(ct) without you leaning into it

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And here's a good use of falsetto and head voice, in the same song. In fact, the highest parts are head voice. And that's not just my opinion but also Robert Lunte's. The falsetto sound is used for the mid-range notes, mainly for effect and that's just Justin's style.

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And Jens kind of has a point. Especially via the Frisell method, where you start training in falsetto and gradually bring some TA like effect back into it.

The love that dare not speak its name, falsetto. Classical styles such as that of Garcia avoid falsetto. Modernly, the sound ideal for much of heavy metal, at least as far as the singers here care for, avoids falsetto. Even though, in the record buying public, falsetto is okay.

For a while, I thought, people in Sweden called clean head voice Falsett(o). Whether it was what we think of falsetto or not.

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i think falsetto and headvoice are the same, headvoice = a trained falsetto wich can carry ta musculature

falsetto would just be the basic voicefunction(ct) without you leaning into it

Bingo! Falsetto doesn't carry TA musculature. That's why my contention is that it's distinct from head voice.

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To me, more than the amount of adduction, the difference between falsetto and head voice is the amount of breathiness in the note. It is totally possible for people to mistake a piercing head note for falsetto.

Was watching the "Headbanger's Journey." An anthropologist has made a full-on study of the history and progression of what we loosely call heavy metal. He interviewed King Diamond (who now lives in Dallas, Texas, by the way, and no, I have not run into him my travels around the Metroplex (areas surround Dallas and Fort Worth.) Though we may have passed each other at some time. He doesn't spend all of his time in make-up and wears a ball cap, like most every other guy in this state.)

He did some of his "falsetto" in the interview. Not really much "air" in the tone. In fact, a fairly solid sounding adduction. Which makes it head voice, pure head voice, if you ask me. But it got labeled as falsetto and he doesn't care. And he has used falsetto, as well. Doesn't matter. Just keep making the royalty checks out to King Diamond. He has a nice 2,000 sq foot house in the suburbs. Yes, one's neighbor could indeed be the evil voice from Mercyful Fate. He still has a danish accent when he speaks, a little thicker than that of Lars.

But was he able to achieve a "full adduction" sound by applying a concentrated stream of air, ala Frisell to give stronger vibration to the membranes of the folds and use resonance to achieve the volume and "ring" one normally associates with "chest?" Could be.

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i think people are scared of the word falsetto and do everything to provide enough facts so thay can boast about their 5-6 octave ranges in "fullvoice" on the internet.

to me and atleast in my country a full glass of water consists of a glass with water up to the top(chest), its not half a glass(mix) of water or an almost empty glass(head) with just a little bit of water in it.

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And to help clarify, head voice at lower dinamic levels, as light as it go, but still modal:

The difference is huge, and its impossible to mistake one for the other: take a note above passaggio, and descend it into a note well into chest. If it does not connect, if you have to let the emission pattern change, air passing, crack, etc, you were in falsetto, not head.

This is also awesome:

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