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Simon T8W
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How do I find my mixed voice?. I've listened to a lot of videos on the net but still unable to find this special set up that everyone is talking about. So I want to know how you guys found your mixed voice. Any demonstrations? Thanks guys

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you can try this.

sing the word "may" (like the month) in an ascending 5 note scale in a medium loud volume from middle c through your break area and as high as you can go before it gets difficult. try not to shout or get too loud as you ascend. watch yourself in a mirror to make sure you're not raisng your larynx.

do not break or let go into falsetto. send a recording over.

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  • 1 month later...

oops very sorry for the very late reply. your information helped me alot. However, I don't even know whether I'm singing in my mix or not. Please listen to this audio:- https://www.box.com/s/a9064526029137f3e944

what am I doing wrong? and I agree is all 'shouty'. Any advice please?

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That's not bad. Sounds like you're in head voice. So that we can tell how connected you are, try a siren at medium volume starting on middle C and go up and down gradually a few times - widen the siren on each pass and see how high you can go without cracking and without pushing yourself too much. (keep the support throughout) If you can get up to a Bb4 or C5 or higher without cracking and everything feels connected then you know you've acheived what some people call "mix voice." Try the same thing at different volumes - heavy and light. You can do the same thing with an ascending and descending octave scale.

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mixed voice doesn't mean head voice. mixed voice results when a singer employs both head and chest voice musculatures. in order to sing well and consitently in a mix, you need a certain level of development of those musculatures.

what will help you is a vocal teacher who can access which area or areas are weak and provide you specific exercises to strengthen those areas.

if you try to sing in mixed voice without some requisite development, you will find it very, very difficult.

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mixed voice doesn't mean head voice. mixed voice results when a singer employs both head and chest voice musculatures. in order to sing well and consitently in a mix, you need a certain level of development of those musculatures.

what will help you is a vocal teacher who can access which area or areas are weak and provide you specific exercises to strengthen those areas.

if you try to sing in mixed voice without some requisite development, you will find it very, very difficult.

Bob you hit the nail on the head.

We train only "chest" voice or only "head" voice to strengthen these two co-ordinations, but this should not be the end all be all. When I first started doing sirens I would transition from chest to head an it would "sound" seamless, but in reality it was still disconnected. I had managed to learn how to coordinate these two different musculature mechanisms to sound like one voice. I realized this coordination setup would not work if I wanted to sing in the break area with power.

I just recently discovered how to really activate the "mixed" voice earlier in this year. Now that I realized how to activate this everything has become so clear. The TRUE "mixed" voice should be the voice that we use for low pitches and high pitches. This is the definition of one voice and once you find it you will never have a need to break, clunk, flip, or change this way of phonation besides vowel modification.

I think you will be able to discover it by working the chest voice for about 15-20 mins then work the head voice for 15-20 mins daily to feel the difference between the two. Then try to get the light flute-like feeling of head voice within your chest voice and try to feel the heavier chest voice in your head voice. As soon as you are able to do this you will be able to simultaneously activate all of these muscles at once and sing with one voice.

This will not happen overnight. It will take time and patience, but it is well worth it. I am just now starting to get it after 3 years of trying to find this. I am sure that with hard work and the correct guidance you can get this a lot sooner than I did.

If you want more info holla back! LOL :)

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IMO, your clip was not mixed voice because it didn't have cry or enough cord closure. Trying singing like you have a serious tummy ache. But the guys are right, it's best to get help from a vocal coach to learn this stuff. Tough to teach over the internet.

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Be very discerning about finding a teacher. I took lessons for years from people who are supposed to be experts in teaching mixed voice, but could never get it. When I finally found it, the sensation to me was more like singing medium volume, moany chest voice and then just singing higher and emphasising certain vowels. Nobody ever told me that mixed voice feels like pulling chest.

It's also quite muscular. This "it should be really effortless" stuff is silly. It takes effort - not a huge amount, but a moderate amount. Here's a good video on this. I don't rate Jesse much as a teacher (or SS or SLS) but he's spot on here (except the stuff about blowing more air).

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yes egg, it's very muscular and a very physically involving way to sing. especially in the notes from e4 through a4. it may be that you didn't have enough of the requisite development built up.

dante has mentioned this several times and i agree that singing in a mix can feel very much like singing in chest. but the chest isn't being "pulled," it's being appropriately utilized. the chest voice musculature has to be included in the mixed voice.

i think a lot of folks don't realize this, or try to work around it because it can be very time consuming and challenging.

i like to think of it as a dumbell curl where the weight is held in the middle position. it takes a lot of strength to hold a dumbell in the mid point.

but again, in a lot of singers this voice has to be developed over a considerable amount of time so when you need to apply stress, or lean into the voice, it can be done without extrinsic muscle involvement.

there's good strain and bad strain too.

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yes egg, it's very muscular and a very physically involving way to sing. especially in the notes from e4 through a4. it may be that you didn't have enough of the requisite development built up.

dante has mentioned this several times and i agree that singing in a mix can feel very much like singing in chest. but the chest isn't being "pulled," it's being appropriately utilized. the chest voice musculature has to be included in the mixed voice.

i think a lot of folks don't realize this, or try to work around it because it can be very time consuming and challenging.

i like to think of it as a dumbell curl where the weight is held in the middle position. it takes a lot of strength to hold a dumbell in the mid point.

but again, in a lot of singers this voice has to be developed over a considerable amount of time so when you need to apply stress, or lean into the voice, it can be done without extrinsic muscle involvement.

there's good strain and bad strain too.

I can honestly agree with this from experience. A one point in life I thought that I had to "switch" to head voice around f4-g4 because I didn't have the strength to get past this area without "flipping"

Now I can sing well past this up to an E5 while still engaging all of the muscles of the larynx. Now it's like I have no "passagio" just one voice. As soon as you realized you don't have to flip or break you will begin to make more progress. Now it is very hard for me to sing a disconnected note. I literally have to make myself do it wrong.

I'm not saying I am perfect or I know all, but what I am saying is that I am making progress and will do anything I can to help other people make the same progress.

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  • 2 weeks later...

IMO, your clip was not mixed voice because it didn't have cry or enough cord closure. Trying singing like you have a serious tummy ache. But the guys are right, it's best to get help from a vocal coach to learn this stuff. Tough to teach over the internet.

I don't know how to do the cord closure stuff and I didn't even know how to sing like I had stomach ache :(

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mixed voice is the holy grail of singing.

"And now, it's time for the Holy Grenade of Antioch. And the counting shall be three."

Sorry, I was powerless to resist.

Mix, lightening as you go higher, starting high and letting the bottom back in, potayto, potahto, tomayto, tomahto.

For most, it's a matter of coordination, methinks.

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maybe you should look into cord closure before you attempt to mix. I would say that you need a strong head and chest voice before you can begin to mix. also have a look at placement and resonance.

however, something I found that helped was placing your forefinger and thumb of one hand gently on your larynx and the other on the bridge of your nose. You should feel equal vibrations in both areas as you enter your mixed voice. although you don't want vibration in the tip of your nose, it's more just behind your nose. I think feeling that nasal resonance is key to getting a good mix

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"And now, it's time for the Holy Grenade of Antioch. And the counting shall be three."

Sorry, I was powerless to resist.

Mix, lightening as you go higher, starting high and letting the bottom back in, potayto, potahto, tomayto, tomahto.

For most, it's a matter of coordination, methinks.

brother ron,

please take the time to explain this to me.

you speak about lightening......your quote above....."lightening as you go higher."......why lighten?....... what are you lightening to?.....for the purpose of what?

thanks in advance for an enlightening explanation....

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brother ron,

please take the time to explain this to me.

you speak about lightening......your quote above....."lightening as you go higher."......why lighten?....... what are you lightening to?.....for the purpose of what?

thanks in advance for an enlightening explanation....

You're welcome, in advance. :)

This will probably come as a shock to you but, believe it or not, not everyone is a dramatic tenor, like you are. A number of them are lyric baritones, some dramatic baritones. For them to reach a note adequately will require some lightening.

Or is Geno also wrong? For he has also talked about lightening, at least from the perspective of KTVA, as well as his model of CT vs TA antagonism.

But even so, I think some of the techniques for baritones to sing high might be usable to tenors.

However, as you said in the skype conference, there is no way you will be convinced that lightening will ever be useful or good or sonically valid, in so many words. In which case, my explanation is moot and you're not really interested in an answer.

You've made up your mind that your way is the only way, thereby inferring that other methods of reaching those high notes with power, clarity, tone, are invalid because they do not involve your paradigm. At least, that's how it appears to me.

I could be wrong. And I have no problem admitting when I am wrong, and that does, indeed, make me an odd invididual.

:)

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At this point in my endever I have to say the lightening up or backing off pressure definately helps me enter and pass through passagio. This is not to say that in a week or two I will need to do this but it helps me now.

If backing off pressure is what Ronws means by lightening as you go higher I have to agree at this point.

I am just learning so I could be way off.

I have to edit. Back of pressure at vocal folds not diaphragm.

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The idea of modifying the vowel is starting to sink in more for me. I have been singing like I speak for so long, plus I pronounce words with a local accent that makes things more difficult for me.(for instance Love for singing would like Luhv. I pronounce a softer version of Loave. But I am starting to realize that this is causing me problems and am doing things to correct it.

In this instance lighten up on pressure means loosening up on vocal mechanism to alow for repositioning of the muscles. Kind of like using the clutch to change gears. Just enough to alow movement.

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brother ron, my "suggested" way is certainly not the "only" way. i never intended to give that impression. i just think it is a very valid option worthy of consideration and/or adaptation.

it's not an easy way, but absolutely a way.

staying strong up high doesn't imply there aren't adjustments that need to be made, but backing off is not mandadory.

thanks for respecting my position.

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  • 2 weeks later...

maybe you should look into cord closure before you attempt to mix. I would say that you need a strong head and chest voice before you can begin to mix. also have a look at placement and resonance.

...

Ok I think I should ask this question now. Basically, the anatomy of the vocal cords in the head voice is the same when you're singing in the mix. So I want to ask, WHAT THEN, is the difference between the HEAD VOICE and the MIXED VOICE? Is the mixed voice just a head voice with 'ng' added to it or what?

I think I have an good head voice by the way. But the whole mixed voice idea sometimes seem very vague to me.

P.S I'll upload an audio tomorrow. Still don't know whether it's mixed voice though. Thanks guys :-)

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a lot of people would give you different opinions on what a mixed voice is. My personal opinion is that mix is actually head but with the right compression/approximation of the vocal folds to get a 'bigger' sound

The first thing you want to do is slow vocal slides to an 'mmm' concentrating on getting your lips buzzing and as you get higher getting your nasal cavities to vibrate/resonate. This feeling is similar to a twang 'nya nya nya' like a little child or a quack like a duck. The twang will automatically give you the vocal fold closure that you want. Don't push to start with either and lighten up as you go higher. this is just building the muscles. Once you can keep the 'mmm' connected all the way through your break you can work on vowels. Mixed voice is a configuration of twang and a low larynx. But if you want my advice, forget mix and just think connected head.

All of these ideas are from the four pillars. If you want to expand on this, buy it. It's a fantastic program and well worth the money

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