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should singing in my chest voice hurt?

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laurasb
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I've always been able to sing in my head voice just fine and I always wondered why my voice didn't sound that strong compared to other singers and that's when I learned about chest voice. I have tried to sing in my chest voice but it always hurts and feels very strained and I feel like my voice sounds disgusting and way to heavy. I also noticed that after I talk for a few minutes my throat hurts. My understanding of chest voice is singing in your talking voice. and can anyone learn to sing well in their chest voice or is it just based completely on natural talent? I don't understand how I can sing so well in my head voice but can't sing at all in my chest voice. HELP!!!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've always been able to sing in my head voice just fine and I always wondered why my voice didn't sound that strong compared to other singers and that's when I learned about chest voice. I have tried to sing in my chest voice but it always hurts and feels very strained and I feel like my voice sounds disgusting and way to heavy. I also noticed that after I talk for a few minutes my throat hurts. My understanding of chest voice is singing in your talking voice. and can anyone learn to sing well in their chest voice or is it just based completely on natural talent? I don't understand how I can sing so well in my head voice but can't sing at all in my chest voice. HELP!!!

Singing should never hurt. Ever.

Singing and talking are different. They just are. Yeah, I know, we're using the same physical structures. But they are used differently. So, singing in chest voice is a bit of a misnomer.

Now, let me say the unpopular thing. Not every voice can sing every range or every song. And it would depend on what you think chest voice is and what part of the range you are trying sing. You could be forcing yourself in order to go lower in pitch.

Also, as far as whether you like your voice or not, most singers don't like parts of their own voice because we can never hear ourselves truly as others hear us. The good side of that is that others hear us through their own psychological filter and some critiques they may have are based on their own psychology. The true litmus test is whether or not your audience likes what you do.

Can a soprano sing "I won't back down" by Tom Petty in the range that he sings it? Maybe and more than likely, maybe not. And, should a soprano sing that in Petty's basso-baritone range? Why? For an oddity?

I challenge you to accept the range that you have and work with that.

Also, you might look into seeing a coach or teacher local to you, for at least one lesson and evaluation. It won't cost as much as some singing systems and it might get you miles ahead of where you are.

Geoff Tate (of Queensryche) had a total of 6 lessons with David P. Kyle. Once a week for 6 weeks. It's the student, as much as it is the lessons.

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