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head voice comfort

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DoverOs
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Been using my head voice a lot, but it feels awkward always singing up there. As far as I can tell, I can sing all the notes in my head range without problems, except the common middle passage breaks. My bridge is pretty big transition in tone. I just don't know what I should be expecting.

Does the head voice get more comfortable and how long did it take if any of you have gone through this? And are there certain ways to warm up the head voice quicker?

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Hey there, DoverO's.

Personally I've been training my "head voice" for about a year now, with the help of a great teacher, and right at about the one year mark I'd say that I had progressed to the point where I can sing reliably sing three octaves without any breaks. Sometimes I'll break when I'm singing a new song for the first time because of certain troubling words or phrases, but I've developed enough technique that I can go back and learn how to fix it. As with anything, I'm sure my voice will continue to improve even more with time.

Around the 3 month point I started using it occasionally to sing in public and about the 6-7 month point I felt like it had become fairly reliable, although still with some trouble spots.

Everyone's progress is different. I think I could've done it a little faster if I'd practiced more and worked more with my teacher in the early stages (I only did a couple of lessons in the first few months). But I feel fine with the pace that I've progressed at.

There are things you can do to become more comfortable in your "head voice". It might be helpful if you could explain a bit about what you mean by "head voice" as this term has different meaning to different people. Where are you learning about the "head voice" from? A vocal coach, YouTube videos, a book? Which coach, videos, book? What exercises are you learning to do from that coach, video, book?

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Uhm yeah, I meant my head mix, TA+CT blend. I learned it all from you-tube and from here. I just practicing singing songs that are sung in head mix. I'm not having trouble with the notes, I can get through my chest mix all the way up to g5, and a few notes higher. Just the whole feel of the voice is still awkward.

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Uhm yeah, I meant my head mix, TA+CT blend. I learned it all from you-tube and from here. I just practicing singing songs that are sung in head mix. I'm not having trouble with the notes, I can get through my chest mix all the way up to g5, and a few notes higher. Just the whole feel of the voice is still awkward.

Dover read my signature :cool: and report back.

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One thing I'd suggest is that sometimes you will have "breaks" in a song that you won't have when you're doing scales and exercises. This is a particular problem in the toughest parts of the passaggio area (around G4-B4 in my case). This has to do with the shape of the vocal tract needed to form certain vowels and how it can push the larynx too high and cause rough spots, even if you are doing everything correctly with the vocal folds to produce a "head voice" or a "head mix" tone.

Rob has a good video explaining covering.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNfpeHE6Wls

Also, I'd add that while terms like "head voice" and "head mix" can be useful when you're first learning, they don't really have any scientific meaning. The bottom line is that you want to be able to sing from the bottom of your range to the top with a tone that is consistent, powerful, and clean, with no breaks or cracks in it. So use these terms to the extent that they're helpful. But remember that what one person calls "head voice", another calls "head mix", and another person calls "mixed or middle".

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dover,

may i make a suggestion that might help?

the problem might be you have conditioned your mind (unbeknowst to you) that going from your lowest note to your highest note involves a bridge, or a change, or a break. you end up anticipating the break, and your mind is there to oblige.

try to remove that imagery from your mind and replace it with thinking of the voice as one connected one.

no breaks, no passagio, no transition, just one connected voice.

bob

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dover,

may i make a suggestion that might help?

the problem might be you have conditioned your mind (unbeknowst to you) that going from your lowest note to your highest note involves a bridge, or a change, or a break. you end up anticipating the break, and your mind is there to oblige.

try to remove that imagery from your mind and replace it with thinking of the voice as one connected one.

no breaks, no passagio, no transition, just one connected voice.

bob

I couldn't have said it better. The only break we have is the one that we create.

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alright, I'll keep trying to connect it. for now I was concentrating on a mix voice, and it seemed to give my head voice more heaviness and a better base.

Also, classically, it seems like a high mix is 1st formant, and a high chest is 2cnd formant. The 1st being easier to access, and the second requiring more training for the resonance, since it's more weighty.

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