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If it comes in correctly, it comes out correctly... automatically?

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kitana
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Hello peeps,

I am kinda new here, but I have been taking a long break from singing.

Since a few weeks ago, I started again with a very nice teacher with loads of practical experience, as well as good knowledge with every method (I think).

Basically, me and my teacher we started all the way from scratch, which means we started out with how to do diaphragmatic breathing. I actually get it how it feels in the body and all that, but it's hard l to control it 100%, and she said that it needs time to be able to control it. Basically, to control NOT to breathe with the upper chest, that's what it's about I think.

However, some days I can really control it good and it's an AWESOME feeling in my belly, as well as in my throat! :D My question is, is it easier to access support (in my understanding hold back the air from not pushing the voice or run out of breath) the more I breathe in correctly for singing (diaphragma breathing)? Cuz right now, it feels like I need to breathe in deeper breathes in order to hold out longer phrases for singing. But I believe that comes with practice? :)

Please share with me your experience!

Kitana

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kitana,

what helped me a lot (more than i could ever have imagined) was strengthening the muscles for breathing (inhalation and exhalation).

not everyone agrees that so much work should be put into this, but for me it was one the best things i could have done.

for inhalation:

try to get rid of the habit of "actively" drawing or sucking in air and replace it with a mindset that air only comes into the body during singing by expansion of the lower core (sides and back) along with an open, relaxed throat.

this action (and mindset) will vacuum in an appropriate amount of air and prevent you from tanking up too much, or underfilling.

for exhalation:

learn to sing keeping the sides and back expanded during the whole time. it takes time and practise to be able to do this without tensing up the throat.

this action will keep you from blowing out the air too quickly and too forcefully allowing you to "place" the pressurized air against the vocal folds.

one year of these exercises and will feel a newfound level of control of the air.

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Great advice Bob.

It really takes time and practice Kitana. But the results are so solid that it would take you effort to actually disrupt your voice from the placement after its settled (and it is done for interpretative purposes). My opinion is that you stick to the trainning. To me it all of it sounds nice specialy: AWESOME feeling in my belly, as well as in my throat

Good Luck!

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Hi guys thank you so much for the replies!

Just to clarify a few things.

Videohere: "for inhalation:

try to get rid of the habit of "actively" drawing or sucking in air and replace it with a mindset that air only comes into the body during singing by expansion of the lower core (sides and back) along with an open, relaxed throat. "

Sides and back? Do you mean like "lower ribcage and back"? I tried your tip and honestly I think we are on the same, because it kind of works for me as well! So thank you so much for this help! :)

Just to add I was also told to focus on my belly to go out but I can only do that when I like half sittin or layin down. When I stand up I can feel it is correct when somehow theres a nice feeling in my back and muscles all around my lower ribcage. Oh, I should add that I'm pretty thin bodied.

Can I still practice singing connected with this exercise you gave me, Videohere?

K

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i don't focus on the belly going out as much as i do the expansion of the sides and back. a point i want to make though is be sure to keep the throat relaxed. you may not have that ability right off the bat. mentally focus the energy on the lower core, diverting tension away from the throat. as you become stronger, you can also learn to inhale very quickly which is helpful on demanding songs.

i use this not only for singing but i am teaching myself to remember to use this for speaking as well.

the beauty about this is you can exercise these muscles anywhere, anytime you feel like it.

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kitana,

what helped me a lot (more than i could ever have imagined) was strengthening the muscles for breathing (inhalation and exhalation).

not everyone agrees that so much work should be put into this, but for me it was one the best things i could have done.

for inhalation:

try to get rid of the habit of "actively" drawing or sucking in air and replace it with a mindset that air only comes into the body during singing by expansion of the lower core (sides and back) along with an open, relaxed throat.

this action (and mindset) will vacuum in an appropriate amount of air and prevent you from tanking up too much, or underfilling.

for exhalation:

learn to sing keeping the sides and back expanded during the whole time. it takes time and practise to be able to do this without tensing up the throat.

this action will keep you from blowing out the air too quickly and too forcefully allowing you to "place" the pressurized air against the vocal folds.

one year of these exercises and will feel a newfound level of control of the air.

Great post videohere!

I would also like add that none of these things are important without good posture. Make sure you keep you rib cage high as if you are gently being pulled by string attached to your sternum, as this will keep the area between the chest and the stomach open.

This alone if combined with a relaxed core upon inhalation will provide more room for your diaphragm to descend much further without any obstruction. If you focus on keep keeping your rib cage in that expanded position without tightening the abs too much you will have a steady and consistent air flow.

I have seen one too many people either purposely slouch to feel the movement only in the lower ab area or the take the correct breath(High rib cage low breath) Then collapse at the onset.

My advice would be to take a breath and feel that buoyant expansion and stay up throughout the phrase.

Good Look! :)

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I third Videohere's post. Diaphragm support should eventually be an involuntary action

Exactly! Ideally you want to place that focus on keeping the rib cage up and correct posture.

That alone will delay the rise of the diaphragm if accompanied with a relaxed stomach/no six pack abs :-)

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all great additional advice folks.

also, after a while you might experience a sensation of breath suspension, a feeling like you are neither inhaling nor exhaling. i find you can get some serious power when you get this to happen. it's a great place to trill from.

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