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Larynx Position

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Keith
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So, I guess I need to know some about Larynx position. So far, I think it goes something like this;

Lower than passagio = neutral

passagio = lowered

above passagio = ?

So, where should it be above the passagio? AND

Is there ever a time where it should be above neutral?

~Keith

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There was a rather lengthy discussion on this, at one time. In any case, the larynx will move a little and that is to be expected. Trying to rigidly hold it in one spot will, I think, induce unneccessary and voice killing strain. A high larynx will bring constriction, though that might add some distortion that some may desire. Especially as the larynx starts to squash against the mucus membrane above it, named by the misnomer, the False Vocal Folds. This reduces or eliminates much of the first formant. But that can also be achieved by lowering the tongue in an effort to lower the larynx and you squash it from top down, rather than bottom up. I suppose, to, it depends on the effect desired. One former member pointed out that if the larynx can be considered almost the bottom of the resonating space, then a high larynx reduces the overall size of the resonator, which may aid the resonation of really high notes.

Me, I wring my larynx out, shake it loose, and hang it on the clothes line to dry out.

:o

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You can theorycraft about this all you want, the fact is this theory needs to be adjusted per the student or the person training.

Theoretically, the larynx needs to rise slightly as you ascend in pitch. However, the student should come to a place where his larynx is released, and where it naturally asumes a good position for the pitch.

In the end you train this with counterbalancing. If your larynx wants to be low for the given pitch, you counterbalance it with a bit higher larynx exercise, if your larynx is too high visa versa. Another practical truth is that certain people can live more comfortably with a higher larynxed position then others, and that there is a ballpark which you can float around without unbalancing yourself. How far this ballpark is, is a discovery process which you do with a good teacher or by yourself.

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It automatically ascends or descends when you sing the right vowels on the pitches where it might give you a problem or if you want to go for a darker or brighter sound. You dont do anything on purpose to raise it or lower it the vowel will take it there. Hope that helps.

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It automatically ascends or descends when you sing the right vowels on the pitches where it might give you a problem or if you want to go for a darker or brighter sound. You dont do anything on purpose to raise it or lower it the vowel will take it there. Hope that helps.

And the clouds part, and the sun shines, and the angels sing, "Amen!"

Eloquent, to the point.

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And the clouds part, and the sun shines, and the angels sing, "Amen!"

Eloquent, to the point.

Just like playing a guitar... think of a note and your fingers will automatically go to the propper string and fret for the sound and intonation that you are looking for. Yes after years of propper training and letting your body find and get used to the correct coordinations.

Sorry for that, I have been singing for 40 or more years. I do not know wheather my larynx is rising falling or going sideways I still can't hit that dredded G4 consistantly. Yes If you do it right it's perfect. But If you haven't done it perfect enough times in a row your body doesn't learn it.

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