Jump to content

Epiglottis in Mix versus headmix/head

Rate this topic


DoverOs
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was wondering what was the difference in epiglottis between Mix and the upper headmix/head registers.

So in the upper head mix, the support is more constricting and pushed. So when the epiglottis manages to release, the head dominance comes through, but TA resonance is basically cut off, with only enough TA to sustain the mode.

While over in the Mix, the support isn't as pushed/constricted, which allows the TA to build resonance up to the correct pitch, without the epiglottis ever getting in the way.

Am I getting the right idea?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a singer I would love to hear an example of the "So in the upper head mix, the support is more constricting and pushed. So when the epiglottis manages to release, the head dominance comes through, but TA resonance is basically cut off, without only enough TA to sustain the pitch." what you said.;) I'm absolutely baffled. And I've been a professional no bullshit money making singer for 20+ yrs but this kind of talk has gone on long enough unless your a dr.

Please give me an example in vocalise and song

I'm so exited to hear this.

Keep in mind I have read just about every book on singing out there and this sound like ground breaking material

And Dover I can't wait to speak with you. Do not take offense to my sarcasm but I do want to hear this stuff

Peace

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, I'll rephrase it. Let's take a range of g4-a5 for a guy. Without proper mix, the notes can be sung, but it's largely CT dominant and has a strained feel.

But with Mix in the same range, you learn to build the resonance you get in TA, without it being as strained.

So from that concept, I'm assuming that the epiglottis is the key point of the strain. And if it's certainly stems from that muscle, then what are the differences.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No I want to know correct physiology of the strain between a well developed mix, and a more head dominant mix/high head voice. Maybe it belongs in the vocal science category, but I feel that this topic is ambiguous as to that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no correct because with each singer it's going to vary on which muscle is more dominant this is the problem and disconnect between physiology and actually just using the vowel to tell you when and where it's gonna get more or less dominant. Hope that helps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Science helps to rationalise things and helps teacher understand the matter beter, and come up with certain exercises. For singing students, unless they are quite advanced, the use is rather limited. I don't wanna fully exclude it because everyone learns different ;>

But you need to question if you want to become a voice scientist, or a singer in the end. Both are not mutually exclusive, but singing is an applied science. If you can't make sense of the difficult terminology to beter your singing, it has no use for you ;P

What I have found with a few of my students though is that they seem more willing to believe me or practise something simply because there is some science backing up my statements.

But in the end DoverOs, you've read my post on the other thread, that's the reality of it all ;> Practise and experimentation. If the science gives you ideas to experiment, great, otherwise, ditch it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, I'll rephrase it. Let's take a range of g4-a5 for a guy. Without proper mix, the notes can be sung, but it's largely CT dominant and has a strained feel.

But with Mix in the same range, you learn to build the resonance you get in TA, without it being as strained.

So from that concept, I'm assuming that the epiglottis is the key point of the strain. And if it's certainly stems from that muscle, then what are the differences.

Good morning, everybody!

DoverOS: There is one thing that I can clarify for this thought process... The Epiglottis is not a muscle, it is a cartilage. IMO, The muscles which position it would not be involved in any singing strain.

I hope this is helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the book knowledge in the world cannot replace practice and experimenting. After you learn to sing well and know your body and voice then if you want to know science it will benifit you much more. If you read a book on driving a car but never drove. You'd be pretty screwed. You might know what the clutch does but if you never touched one I wouldn't get in the car with ya ;)

Peace

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the book knowledge in the world cannot replace practice and experimenting. After you learn to sing well and know your body and voice then if you want to know science it will benifit you much more. If you read a book on driving a car but never drove. You'd be pretty screwed. You might know what the clutch does but if you never touched one I wouldn't get in the car with ya ;)

Peace

For me a 40 year beginner when I have bought books on how to sing and improving your singing,

Using the analogy of A clutch What I would find is what the clutch is made up of what materials, how much percentage of metal to non metal materials what happens on the inside of the transmission between the gears.

What I want to know is where do I find it and how do I use the stupid thing. Oh, It's on the floor between Gas pedal and Brake Press down on it before changing gears . After gear engages let off of it. O.K. now I can practice

doing that.

Here in this forum I have some of the clutches and how to use them. Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"The epiglottis is a flap that is made of elastic cartilage tissue covered with a mucous membrane, attached to the entrance of the larynx. It projects obliquely upwards behind the tongue and the hyoid bone, pointing dorsally. The term, like tonsils, is often incorrectly used to refer to the uvula. There are taste buds on the epiglottis." I'm not seeing from this definition how it has anything to do with singin or strain...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And once you realize that you just can't purposefully control all the parts of the vocal tract, you will be better off. The only way to get some of the parts of the vocal Tract to work the way you want them to is indirectly using excersizes. Get a singing program, a coach, or a teacher. Get in front of someone. My 2 cents

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...