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Do lighter tenors generally have wider ranges?

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EvilSoup
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It seems that way to me. For example James Mercer from the Shins has a full voice range of E2-D5, whereas Chris Martin only has a range of E2-A4. Thom Yorke is E2-B4.

Do thicker vocal cords have less flexibility?

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It seems that way to me. For example James Mercer from the Shins has a full voice range of E2-D5, whereas Chris Martin only has a range of E2-A4. Thom Yorke is E2-B4.

Do thicker vocal cords have less flexibility?

This is not true at all...I would argue that heavy voices have larger ranges, but the weight of the voice has nothing to do with range. I have a question...How do u know what there ranges are? Nobody really knows another person's range unless you sit down at the piano with them during warm ups.

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This is not true at all...I would argue that heavy voices have larger ranges, but the weight of the voice has nothing to do with range. I have a question...How do u know what there ranges are? Nobody really knows another person's range unless you sit down at the piano with them during warm ups.

It's not scientific I'll admit. I'm going by what notes they've hit in their music and what they seem to struggle with. It could be Chris has much worse technique than James, but I can't really imagine Chris hitting a D5 as easily as James does. Yet Chris and James both can just barely hit E2.

Maybe lower singers could have bigger ranges, it's just trickier to train.

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It sounds like Evilsoup is going of the the ranges listed on therangeplace.com. They have a cool directory of ranges, if you are into that kind of thing. Anyway, I think bigger voices generally have a harder time mixing/reducing TA involvement/going into middle voice/curbing/ or whatever you call it. That is, more so than light voices do. This is probably more of a psychological barrier than a physical one, though.

Bigger, lower voices have more room to gain range, usually, than higher ones because it is more difficult to extend the lower range than the high one.

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When it comes down to the pure physics, every male chest register has around 24 semi notes. The big difference is the formant, approach, and natural sound production. A tenor tends to have a 1st formant/lyric approach, and a more prominent head-mix sound. While a lower singer has more 2nd formant/dramatic approach, and less of that head-mix sound.

So in the end, they both have the same range, but people get confused between the two distinctions, which also can lead to the idea that person X has a bigger range than person Y.

On the other end of the spectrum, there are many singers who have great fry control, extending their range downward while still keeping the high end.

I'm just addressing pure chest voice here. It's indeed trickier for heavier and lighter singers in both respects.

Nice

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I'm a light tenor and I don't have as much range as Geoff Tate. Never will, probably. Certainly don't have as much range as Axl Rose. He was actually a legit bass in church choir as a teenager. Nor does being a light tenor mean that I can sing above C6, at least with what I consider usable notes. Everyone has a natural range of any sound possible. Within that and smaller than that is the artistic range, aptly described by Steven Fraser as the region where you have the most dynamic element, meaning the greatest variation in tone and volume control.

It's hard for me to commit to the idea that one's speaking voice is predeterminate of one's singing voice as for range. Or range that is used. On the other hand, many tenors seem to have speaking voices that are pitched a bit higher than other men who have success as baritones. I was listening to an interview with Scott Stapp, who considers himself a baritone. And speaks like one, as well. He speaks lower than I do, for sure.

The other day, I managed to get down to G2, then F#2, then fried an E2. And cannot repeat that today. Not that I really need to. And my tone is different from legit baritones. It doesn't have that room filling ring. Even though I won't sound like Tate, I would like to cover "Silent Lucidity" one day. It is my wife's favorite Queensryche song. I probably need to wait until I day that I have a cold or allergies to get that gravelly low. And I would probably still have to growl for the lowest note. So, I better get that right, the first time.

Steven Fraser has mentioned that he is a basso-baritone and that he can sing a C6. That is a huge range. So, while he could obviously sing the tenor range, would he sound the same as a light tenor?

Interesting question, in the op, but I am not sure there is an answer, save the opinions and experience of those who say yea, or nay.

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