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Range limit

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D.Starr
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I was wondering if there is a limit on your range.

I see and hear that many singers have around 2.5 octaves.

Does this mean that I won't be able to get past A4 which I can currently hit and kinda still working on.

My lowest note is give C2. Highest Ive successfully sung is A4. I only wish to be able to sing up to C5. I believe R&B doesnt really need anything higher. I dont want that sound anyway, though would be nice to get higher.

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I can't speak for others but I think there are limits to the range of my voice, especially as used artistically. The other day, almost magically, I got down to F#2 with some usable volume but normally, I can't do that. My top note is C6. Normally, my voice ranges from C3 to C6. That's only 3 octaves.

I think there also different voices types, mainly light or heavy. And I think that can have an effect on usable limit.

The more famous singers you can think of know the limitations of their voice. Both in range and type. And they stick with songs that fit their voice. A phrase I read over and over again in Martin's book from the big names is "do what it is your voice can do, don't do what it cannot do."

Now, I expect to be misunderstood and people will think I am saying that baritones and basses can't sing high notes in the tenor range. Of course they can. And I agree with Steven Fraser, that it will often sound tonally different, depending on the type of voice.

I read on Wikipedia that Geoff Tate's top note is an A5, though I don't think he uses it often. Steven Tyler's top note in the song "Dream On" is an Ab5. But Tate can rumble the ground with, I think, an E2. Each voice is different.

Generally, most singers can manage 2 to 2.5 octaves, which will serve all the needs of their singing. Most vocal lines don't go beyond 1.5 octaves, though Geoff Tate and Axl Rose surpass that because they can.

But a big chunk of what is standing in your way is trying to sing like you speak. We do not sing as we speak. Yeah, I know it's the same organ and structures being used but they are being used in different ways.

But who cares if you never get to C5? I don't think Bono's done a C5, professionally. Neither has Tom Petty, as far as I know. If Elton John got to C5, it was in falsetto. And Elton John is an icon, admired by people such as Axl Rose, who has no problems speaking of his admiration for Elton's work.

But if getting to C5 makes you happy, go for it. You do what you gotta do. No retreat, no surrender.

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There is a limit on range but it sure isn't 2.5 octaves. You can definitely get to C5 and beyond if you want. You have to work hard and on the right things though. It's not easy.

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There is no limit to vocalrange, you can get how high you want. Whats limiting though is the quality of the sound, the chestyer and more speechlike you intend to sound the harder it gets to go up into the highrange.

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Yeah, keep treking. Last week I was messing around in band practice and was hitting really chesty D5s (I checked it on my guitar). My highest note used to be A4 too. I've found that singing along with singers and copying their tone quality (or trying) has really helped. Since you like R and B and Soul I'd say try out Sam Cooke.

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I get why it feels like a limit with the setup you're using, remember I used to have troubles too but right now I've gotten at least F5 so just don't give up.

For me finding head voice was weird as hell and unnatural but it worked and I thought I couldn't as well.

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as dan and geno says, if you're willing to put in the time and practise. the basics: scales, arpeggios, every day. go has high as possible without disconnecting or pushing each day.

you'll never know till you try (a lot)...lol!!!!

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as dan and geno says, if you're willing to put in the time and practise. the basics: scales, arpeggios, every day. go has high as possible without disconnecting or pushing each day.

you'll never know till you try (a lot)...lol!!!!

Great post! The main emphasis should be on "staying connected" and not "pushing" the voice past where it is comfortable. As time passes you can slowly increase the range in a safe way as long as each note is comfortable.

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Great post! The main emphasis should be on "staying connected" and not "pushing" the voice past where it is comfortable. As time passes you can slowly increase the range in a safe way as long as each note is comfortable.

I believe how you access the connection is highly personal. I tried practising carefully regularly for a few months and it did nothing for me.

I definitely did not get it by being comfortable, I forced my voice into head voice with tons of unhealthy pressure and tensing damn near every muscle from the neck up but after I got it my voice has naturally adjusted and I don't need to do that anymore. It's just a matter of getting into the right setup and after you do that once the voice will follow. Everyone has different problems and different solutions.

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I believe how you access the connection is highly personal. I tried practising carefully regularly for a few months and it did nothing for me.

I definitely did not get it by being comfortable, I forced my voice into head voice with tons of unhealthy pressure and tensing damn near every muscle from the neck up but after I got it my voice has naturally adjusted and I don't need to do that anymore. It's just a matter of getting into the right setup and after you do that once the voice will follow. Everyone has different problems and different solutions.

I understand that, but I don't think he is trying to increase his range in head voice. I think he wants to be able to sing higher with a chest like sound. I can sing up to an E6, but it doesn't have a chest like quality. It's pure head voice. I think the best high notes are the chesty notes in the 5th octave.

I'm not to impressed with a light head voice in the 5th octave.

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if it's full voice, performing voice, both head and chest musculatures engaged, mixed voice, whatever you want to call it, it's going to take a lot of work.

i'm experiencing for the first time (today) the ability to hold onto a light full voice. i guess you could say it's like a balancing act.

and it's very tedious because if you don't have a little finesse up there (d5) it will fall apart. i'm certain frisell's head voice slides helped me get light closure, something i need more work on.

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Yeah that is what I'm talking about, and I agree it takes work, but getting into the setup was instant access (once I did it right) and that was the EASY part.

Yes being able to do it as lightly as possible is what you want, so you have full control. I still don't think it will take more then a year to get good at it and maybe another year to almost perfecting it

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