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After a few months of struggling with my tenor voice!

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Kuroneku
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Hey everyone.

So, in the last few months I've been suffering from "something" that does not allow me to sing full (long) high notes anymore. I either crack or sound awkward, which did NOT use to be the case.

What's funny though; if I sing high Tenor-ranging notes in an OPERATIC way, it's no big deal at all! I could not even be warmed up & sing up to an Eb5.

What is it that differs in OPERATIC singing from Pop/Rock singing??????? I need to know so I can work on fixing my frustrating issue here =/

I've tried different warm-up excessive, the way I position my tongue when singing long/full high notes. Everything!

It's like-I've unlearned singing high Rock/Pop. By "high" I mean chest notes passing "F4".

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what have you been doing in the last few months. Did you change a routine.

What happened was; I took almost a year off from training steadily & when I got back into about 4 months ago, I was doing amazingly well, but it only lasted for about a month. I feel extremely desperate, because I never had voice issues more than just a few days in the past.

I'd need to know what differs in OPERATIC singing & Rock/Pop singing. I still have my range in OPERATIC voice, but I'm suddenly only LIMITED to Baritone range when I sing Rock

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Here's my layman's view.

Opera Singing - singing within the fach that is most accessible for you, where you have the greatest volume and control of tone, i.e., dynamic. Your part or role will not exceed approx 2 to 2.5 octaves. The desire is to create a beautiful tone with your voice, rather than just any tone, or sound effects.

Pop / rock singing - Any noise your body can possibly make is considered usable. Defects in the tone of the voice are admired, often sought after. Notably, rasp and rattly distortions in the voice. Things that would normally preclude one from singing opera are acceptable in pop music. Even singing off-key is sometimes accepted in a performer or song if it's part of that song.

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Hi,

In addation to what has already been said, It may be helpful to mention that the upper voice needs twang, even when you are not siinging in an operatic tone.

Go back and work the exercises which you formerly used, prior to your singing cessation, and re-establish your pop technique in the middle range.

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First of all I would like to thank everyone for their responses.

I very often sing into my condenser as I have my headphones on. I'm also right next to my piano to sing up & down scales or check on which notes I'm singing.

I'll try to record some examples later for you guys.

Thanks again!

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The difference I can tell is the position of the larynx. Mezza voce in operatic lowers the larynx and narrows the throat passage, reducing constriction in your high notes. However mezza voce in pop only seems to be a tonality thing rather than a technique, because the larynx stays neutral in this style, versus lowered.

The larynx isn't the problem though. I would guess that your Mix is just out of practice, and you need to work on it. Your mix has to be warmed up and coordinated enough that you can add more chest/belty sound to it.

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