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Singing voice vs. Speaking voice What's the difference?

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izzle1989
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my opnion?

i think it depends a lot on the vocalist's instrument.

genre, vocal weight, and timbre factor in to it too, i would say.

also very important is what you wish to sound like. if you want to be really thick and powerful, it's won't be like speaking.

no way, no how......lol!!!

some voices need a certain level of omph just to get going...lol!!!

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my opnion?

i think it depends a lot on the vocalist's instrument.

genre, vocal weight, and timbre factor in to it too, i would say.

also very important is what you wish to sound like. if you want to be really thick and powerful, it's won't be like speaking.

no way, no how......lol!!!

some voices need a certain level of omph just to get going...lol!!!

What I was getting at with this is just as easily as it is to change your mode of speaking whether it is bright, dark, nasally, throaty, and powerfully we can do the same with our singing voice.

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To me, my singing voice feels as a more efficient version my speaking voice. Easier to use, at least on the parts that the trainning has consolidated. I can go much louder than I normaly can when I speak, even when excited, and I have much more clarity.

Its still me, I dont change my voice into something else, but the usage is very different.

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For me, speaking and the singing voice feel like extensions of each other. When I speak excitedly, I'm already in singing mode. (I've been told that I can sometimes speak as high as a G4 when excited.) The two feel no different, except when singing, I'm actually sustaining the notes with vibrato. Singing also feels the same as when I call out to someone to get their attention, although this could be because I trained myself to do it in that manner. It feels unnatural to call out any other way.

~~Dante~~

I feel the same way and have purposely tried to make these two one and the same. When I record myself the closer I try to get towards my speaking voice while singing the better it sounds. When I want to get a clearer tone with more vocal fold adduction I vocalize on a staccato vowel. This staccato vowel does not feel like I am singing, but merely speaking the vowel on pitch very quickly.

I really believe many of our issues with singing stem from the fact that we have poor speaking habits which transfer to our singing habits, or we try to make our singing voice sound completely different from our speaking voice.

Before anybody says anything about how different the breathing technique for singing is I would like to mention that our breathing technique for singing is suppose to be natural to us anyway. Babies breathe this way from the time they exit the womb.

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To me, my singing voice feels as a more efficient version my speaking voice. Easier to use, at least on the parts that the trainning has consolidated. I can go much louder than I normaly can when I speak, even when excited, and I have much more clarity.

Its still me, I dont change my voice into something else, but the usage is very different.

I understand exactly where you are coming from on this post Felipe. I also feel that my singing voice is slightly better, but I attribute that because of my more efficient use of the breathing mechanism while singing.

We are taught to breathe this way while we sing, but technically this is how we are suppose to breathe for life.

Yogic Breath=Breath for life.

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I am just finding my singing voice, thanks to everyone here. My speaking voice up till now has been low muffled and quiet. Hopefully that will change too. Unlike others when i get excited my voice goes deeper and richer instead of higher. Maybe that's why it's so hard for me to blend chest/head, But I am getting better.

I haven't exactly tried to imitate other singers voices, but my voice would change from song to song. Maybe the voice does need to change for different styles of singing.

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I am just finding my singing voice, thanks to everyone here. My speaking voice up till now has been low muffled and quiet. Hopefully that will change too. Unlike others when i get excited my voice goes deeper and richer instead of higher. Maybe that's why it's so hard for me to blend chest/head, But I am getting better.

I haven't exactly tried to imitate other singers voices, but my voice would change from song to song. Maybe the voice does need to change for different styles of singing.

In pop singing, one lightens up the voice and allows the voice to bridge/mix into the higher notes. In opera and choir styles, the core voice has to be loose and resonant, which extends to the low and high parts, allowing for that resonant sound through the whole range. Those are just two styles I know.

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this is a difficult topic, because some people may speak as incorrectly as they sing. For me, it seems that my speaking voice is healthy and has quite good closure. I screw my singing up by mentally resetting my chord closure to more woofy, something Ive been trying to correct for a long time.

For me, the actual onset in my speech is a healthy, relaxed, resonating singing configuration. The tricky bit is to keep the actual onset configuration going after the onset and all through the note. When I practice that, I get a nice powerful easy resonation (imo). It seems that the slight pressure on the chords that I find in my speech onset is something in the vicinity of the correct pressure balance between exhalation and chords.

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this is a difficult topic, because some people may speak as incorrectly as they sing. For me, it seems that my speaking voice is healthy and has quite good closure. I screw my singing up by mentally resetting my chord closure to more woofy, something Ive been trying to correct for a long time.

For me, the actual onset in my speech is a healthy, relaxed, resonating singing configuration. The tricky bit is to keep the actual onset configuration going after the onset and all through the note. When I practice that, I get a nice powerful easy resonation (imo). It seems that the slight pressure on the chords that I find in my speech onset is something in the vicinity of the correct pressure balance between exhalation and chords.

Great post Matt this is exactly what I mean. I feel that the mental stress that we place on singing as opposed to speaking is way more demanding. I feel that this is where the problems begin.

Of course there are many who have less that ideal speaking voices and are very timid speaking in front of others, but I feel that the speaking voice and the singing voice should not be looked at as two different entities.

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It's taken me a while to come with some thoughts for this thread. For I firmly believe that we cannot sing as we speak. And that most singing problems come from trying sing the same way we speak. Most people that are not stage actors speak with a collapsing diaphragm. That's just enough residual pressure to create sound with the folds. When I say stage actor, I think of William Shatner. Watch him as he speaks. He supports. You see his mid-section get in gear as he starts a phrase. That is from some singing training that has helped stage actors. Most people don't speak with that involvement of the support. But it is that support that is required for singing.

Secondly, language and accent. Some languages and accent have a little more nasal resonance than others. Those circumstances, I think, make it easier for such a person to sing.

Aside from all that, I think one's tone of voice in speaking does not change, so much, when singing. I think that one thing pretty much stays the same, resonated for better or worse, as the case may be.

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I actually mean stage speaking, really. When I want to find my configuration, I speak the notes, e.g. roughly in the correct pitch, loudly, at an opposite wall. I took some speech classes a while back and that worked so well that I continue to pretend Im speaking in a loud stage voice at my instructor. It gets me into a configuration within minutes that I could spend hours trying to find. I do the same thing if Im having trouble hitting high notes. I speak them at roughly the correct pitch and immediately l lose problems with tension in the throat, too high adams apple, etc. I can quite easily speak at a G4 with a full, strong voice and my adams apple doesnt want to shoot up under my chin.

For me, it really helps.

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I feel the same way and have purposely tried to make these two one and the same. When I record myself the closer I try to get towards my speaking voice while singing the better it sounds. When I want to get a clearer tone with more vocal fold adduction I vocalize on a staccato vowel. This staccato vowel does not feel like I am singing, but merely speaking the vowel on pitch very quickly.

I really believe many of our issues with singing stem from the fact that we have poor speaking habits which transfer to our singing habits, or we try to make our singing voice sound completely different from our speaking voice.

Before anybody says anything about how different the breathing technique for singing is I would like to mention that our breathing technique for singing is suppose to be natural to us anyway. Babies breathe this way from the time they exit the womb.

Hey Ron did you read this post? I know that some accents and speech patterns are different and some are better than others, but I am talking about phonation in general. At the end of the day singing is just elongated speech. We are "suppose" to support the voice anyway, but we loose this natural style of breathing as time goes on.

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I actually mean stage speaking, really. When I want to find my configuration, I speak the notes, e.g. roughly in the correct pitch, loudly, at an opposite wall. I took some speech classes a while back and that worked so well that I continue to pretend Im speaking in a loud stage voice at my instructor. It gets me into a configuration within minutes that I could spend hours trying to find. I do the same thing if Im having trouble hitting high notes. I speak them at roughly the correct pitch and immediately l lose problems with tension in the throat, too high adams apple, etc. I can quite easily speak at a G4 with a full, strong voice and my adams apple doesnt want to shoot up under my chin.

For me, it really helps.

Matt it seems that you have found this connection that many people seek.

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Hey Ron did you read this post? I know that some accents and speech patterns are different and some are better than others, but I am talking about phonation in general. At the end of the day singing is just elongated speech. We are "suppose" to support the voice anyway, but we loose this natural style of breathing as time goes on.

I did gloss right over that but many times before, I have said that part of the problem of singing like you speak is that most people speak incorrectly. And often that has do to with language and accent. Sometimes, just accent. But I think many have glossed on over it when I have said it, as well.

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yeah, if people are speaking incorrectly to begin, thats not going to help much. However, there are some advantages that I think people who speak incorrectly might still get from that approach; for example, theres no shoulder-lifting and things like that going on in speech.

In my particular case, I think that I once upon a time started out with a fairly healthy singing voice, just because I was imitating strong singers. As I delved into singing more, I lost my way, misunderstood tips I picked up, and increasingly headed towards a bad woofy sound. I also noticed the change in people's response to my voice. It used to be that people would say I had a great voice, then through the years, I noticed people werent saying that anymore, and eventually people were saying, "hmmm, doesnt sound very good. Are you sure youre doing this right?"

For me, going back to speech onset seems to take me back to my default method, and very inspirationally, Ive heard people start saying again, "hey, you have a voice!" So, in my case, Im certain Im returning to a more healthy, easy method. I spoke to a vocal coach recently who said that my method was probably a good idea, but that only knowing one method would limit me, which I thought was an interesting comment.

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yeah, if people are speaking incorrectly to begin, thats not going to help much. However, there are some advantages that I think people who speak incorrectly might still get from that approach; for example, theres no shoulder-lifting and things like that going on in speech.

In my particular case, I think that I once upon a time started out with a fairly healthy singing voice, just because I was imitating strong singers. As I delved into singing more, I lost my way, misunderstood tips I picked up, and increasingly headed towards a bad woofy sound. I also noticed the change in people's response to my voice. It used to be that people would say I had a great voice, then through the years, I noticed people werent saying that anymore, and eventually people were saying, "hmmm, doesnt sound very good. Are you sure youre doing this right?"

For me, going back to speech onset seems to take me back to my default method, and very inspirationally, Ive heard people start saying again, "hey, you have a voice!" So, in my case, Im certain Im returning to a more healthy, easy method. I spoke to a vocal coach recently who said that my method was probably a good idea, but that only knowing one method would limit me, which I thought was an interesting comment.

I'm glad that you are finding success with this. Maybe we can learn to sing like we speak if we also work on improving our speaking voices too.

Overall my message is to all of the people who try to drastically alter the way the sing by making it sound as far away from speech as possible. I was once one of those people and I never realized how closely related singing and speaking are.

If I hear someone sing with a breathy tone, but speak with a clear resonant tone that is a red flag. I have rarely heard someone with horrible speech patterns vocalize with ease.

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For me, going back to speech onset seems to take me back to my default method, and very inspirationally, Ive heard people start saying again, "hey, you have a voice!" So, in my case, Im certain Im returning to a more healthy, easy method.

Basically, doing what it is that your voice can do and avoiding what it won't do. I wonder where I have heard that before?

I spoke to a vocal coach recently who said that my method was probably a good idea, but that only knowing one method would limit me, which I thought was an interesting comment.

I would ignore his/her comment that only knowing one method would limit you. You tried some different methods and those things did limit you. Going back to what was intuitive for your voice freed it up, n'est pas? Trust your instincts.

I will still standby the credo that singing should get easier as time goes by, not more difficult.

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nah, I didnt try other methods, I misunderstood other methods for years and did them wrong. To reiterate our old martial arts comparisons, I did something similar with boxing. Picked up tips from youtube and whatever, practiced them, then went down to a boxing gym, where the instructor immediately had to unlearn all the nonsense I'd picked up...If I'd done that for 15-20 years, as with singing, and then went down to a boxing gym, I would have really had my work cut out for me to unlearn all the bad technique.

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nah, I didnt try other methods, I misunderstood other methods for years and did them wrong.

I have done that, too. I misunderstood FVF distortion because I did not know the anatomy at the time. Messed myself up, recovered.

Then, someone let me know that I did not properly understand overlay distortion, so I gave that up, too. And just stick with what my voice can do.

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Heh. I wish I'd either never listened to any tips at all, or else taken proper schooling to get it right...as they say, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Truer words have never been spoken

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For me singing is definitely an extension of my speaking voice depending on what I'm singing. If I'm warming up it is part of my speaking voice if I'm singing soul r&b blues it's definitely an extension of my speaking voice if I'm singing something that sounds pushed(foo fighters, ac/dc, Cornell) than it is not an extension of my speaking voice. I guess it all comes down to style for me.

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For me singing is definitely an extension of my speaking voice depending on what I'm singing. If I'm warming up it is part of my speaking voice if I'm singing soul r&b blues it's definitely an extension of my speaking voice if I'm singing something that sounds pushed(foo fighters, ac/dc, Cornell) than it is not an extension of my speaking voice. I guess it all comes down to style for me.

I feel that even if it is pushed it is an extension of your speaking voice. Just like you would push your "speaking" voice at a loud rock concert.

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For me singing is definitely an extension of my speaking voice depending on what I'm singing. If I'm warming up it is part of my speaking voice if I'm singing soul r&b blues it's definitely an extension of my speaking voice if I'm singing something that sounds pushed(foo fighters, ac/dc, Cornell) than it is not an extension of my speaking voice. I guess it all comes down to style for me.

But you also seem to have good habits in your speach. Is it a case of where singing help clarify your speaking and now the two are relatively indistinguishable?

Just an odd question I thought of.

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