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Air coming out of mouth

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jzhang172
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When doing "ssss" breath exercises, I switch it up and do ssSSsss...the S represents a louder sound. Should more air be coming out of mouth or should the air coming out be consistent with the other S's regardless of the volume?

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I think this is healthy. Start with the smallest s imaginable and grow it how you like. What you should do is avoiding air altogether. Use no air in your mind (obviously there is air) and keep it flowing both soft and loud. To really get a loud loud S-sound you do not need air but a strong support.

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Geran89,

I'm not sure if you were saying this, but I just want to throw it out there for anyone reading. Compression and breath pressure are related, but not interchangeable. They should go together, but do not always do so. Compression just comes from the cords themselves holding more tightly, while increased breath pressure comes from connecting into the support more.

If you just try to increase compression without increasing breath pressure, you just end up getting tight and constricted in the throat. To correct this type of scenario and find adequate breath pressure, it might feel like you are indeed attempting to use more air as izzle pointed out, even though the sound is not breathy.

If you increase breath pressure without increasing compression, you get louder but blasty -- air will be leaking through the cords.

If you increase cord compression and increase breath pressure together, then you actually get louder. It's a bit of a juggling act to figure out what's the appropriate balance for your particular voice, but with proper guidance, it shouldn't be too hard to figure out.

~~Dante~~

Exactly! I know most singers and voice teachers are scared to use the more air suggestion because of fear of pushing or fear of creating a breathy sound. When you sing louder more air is used without any thought of using more air.

Try this for me...Sing a very soft note with as little breath pressure as possible and take notice to what your abs are doing then take that same note and begin to slowly crescendo until you are at 10 and as loud as you can sing while still being under control.

What did you feel? Do you feel like you can make this sound last longer than the pianissimo sound? If you are a human being like me then the answer is no.

We don't have to be afraid of air pressure when we are inhaling correctly and efficiently closing the vocal folds. It is nearly impossible to push the voice if the vocal folds are approximating correctly.

Like I said you must never actively think about exhaling air only making the desired sound.

Louder sounds do require more air.

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You can get more loudness with more air sure, but more air is not indicative of loudness. More air will only take loudness to a certain level before it becomes more harmful than good. The strength of the harmonic formants give the perception of loudness due to the strength of specific harmonic frequencies.

I guess why I jumped in quickly on that with such a black and white answer, even though that's not necessarily the case, is because the idea of more breath = more loudness can be a damaging mentality, especially for a beginner (it certainly was the case for me), especially when we go into head voice territory because you can produce sounds just as loud in your head voice as your chest voice while using less air, so i suppose it also depends on which part of your voice you're talking about.

This is a great explination

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You can get more loudness with more air sure, but more air is not indicative of loudness. More air will only take loudness to a certain level before it becomes more harmful than good. The strength of the harmonic formants give the perception of loudness due to the strength of specific harmonic frequencies.

I guess why I jumped in quickly on that with such a black and white answer, even though that's not necessarily the case, is because the idea of more breath = more loudness can be a damaging mentality, especially for a beginner (it certainly was the case for me), especially when we go into head voice territory because you can produce sounds just as loud in your head voice as your chest voice while using less air, so i suppose it also depends on which part of your voice you're talking about.

This is a great explination

This is very true for a beginner, but if more attention is given towards how the vocal folds are functioning than it is impossible to over blow unless you are not getting good closure.

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Try this for me...Sing a very soft note with as little breath pressure as possible and take notice to what your abs are doing then take that same note and begin to slowly crescendo until you are at 10 and as loud as you can sing while still being under control.

What did you feel? Do you feel like you can make this sound last longer than the pianissimo sound? If you are a human being like me then the answer is no.

I don't think that's down to the amount of air you're using necessarily, but the effort of supporting a bigger note. If i swell the volume of the tone whist keeping the same "fullness" of the note then i really don't notice much difference. If I change the fullness then it becomes more strenuous, but that's because I am doing other additional things to achieve that fullness (extra support, adductionetc)

This is very true for a beginner, but if more attention is given towards how the vocal folds are functioning than it is impossible to over blow unless you are not getting good closure.

I agree, that's why I stated I personally think it's poignant to mention in the case of a beginner. I don't think it's impossible to over blow your cords just because you have connection. I could belt a B4 and still have a connected tone but for me (because i"m not that good =P) I would be overblowing and squeezing like mad.

I suppose while we're getting into this, it's hard to pinpoint one answer because there are so many other factors involved. I find a lot with singing, and with other subjects too, that you're normally told "this is how things work/don't do this" when you start, then as you learn more "...well, actually you CAN do this now you know what you're doing" !!!

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I don't think that's down to the amount of air you're using necessarily, but the effort of supporting a bigger note. If i swell the volume of the tone whist keeping the same "fullness" of the note then i really don't notice much difference. If I change the fullness then it becomes more strenuous, but that's because I am doing other additional things to achieve that fullness (extra support, adductionetc)

I agree, that's why I stated I personally think it's poignant to mention in the case of a beginner. I don't think it's impossible to over blow your cords just because you have connection. I could belt a B4 and still have a connected tone but for me (because i"m not that good =P) I would be overblowing and squeezing like mad.

I suppose while we're getting into this, it's hard to pinpoint one answer because there are so many other factors involved. I find a lot with singing, and with other subjects too, that you're normally told "this is how things work/don't do this" when you start, then as you learn more "...well, actually you CAN do this now you know what you're doing" !!!

I understand you completely...As a beginner I would always take certain concepts to the extreme when it really takes more of a balanced approach. This approach will be slightly different according to someone's individual needs.

I can honestly say I really don't like using the loud SSS because we will never feel this while singing unless we are pushing or singing breathy. The changes with breath pressure are barely perceptible when we are singing and it should be more directed towards making a clear sound.

I was once a breath first person, a breathing is everything person, but that is only half of the equation. As Dante said the breath and the vocal fold compression are interrelated and interdependent on each other. If the vibrating source/the larynx/the reed keeps the right amount of tension and does not lose this tension then the breath has no choice but to be converted into sound.

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