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Trip
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I hope that here we can share in one place some quotes from various sources (either written or spoken) pertaining to vocal technique.

I'll start this off with something from Richard Miller's "Securing the bass, bass-baritone and baritone voice", for all of us naturally low-voiced guys:

As the baritone arrives at the zona di passaggio, because there is greater

resistance to the exiting breath, the period of vocal-fold closure is longer, and

the open phase is briefer than in speech. Some speech researchers ignore the

difference between these actions in speaking and in singing. They maintain

that phonation at any pitch level should retain an identical closure/open pattern.

However, as has frequently been pointed out, range extension, tessitura,

phrase duration, and the intensity of breath pressure (all determined by the

adducting/abducting glottis) demand varying energy levels throughout the

great (two-octave) scale.

It will be recalled that the baritone voce media is inclined to extend from

B3 to E4 or Bb3 to Eb4. The bass-baritone experiences his zona di passaggio around A3 to D4,

the bass between the regions of Ab3–Db4 or G3–C4 (see chapter1).

From the first note of the passage zone to its pivotal registration point roughly a fourth above,

the energy level of the airflow and the vocal-fold resistance to the exit of breath gradually increase.

The closed phase lasts longer as the scale mounts.

For these reasons, the transition from modal (“chest”) to

voce piena in testa (“full voice in head”) is one of the subtlest technical tasks for the male singer.

This brings up the role that relaxation has been assigned in various voice

pedagogies. Tonicity requires greater, not less, energy in the passage zone. Yet

there are pedagogues who request that the singer simply “relax.” A general

performance preparation and enhancement

admonition to relax lacks in specifics: What does one relax? When does one

relax? How does one bring relaxation about? Relaxation is not the antonym

of tension. Calling for relaxation initiates an entirely different process than

that of tonicity. As Dr. Brodnitz reminded us several decades ago, if one were

to totally relax he would fall to the floor. Just at the point where tonicity

should be at its highest, attempting to “relax” reduces the energy level. At the

same time, caution must be exercised that the low-voiced male not unduly increase

vigor when singing in the zona di passaggio. As in all technical matters,

the balancing out of energy levels is essential.

Female teachers who understand the physiology and the acoustics of the

singing voice can teach male voices just as well as do their male colleagues.

However, over a number of decades of practical encountering, it has been my

experience that most female teachers do not ask their male students to energize

sufficiently in upper-middle voice (the passage zone) and above, because

the female voice does not require the same increase in energy in that segment

of the voice that is so essential to the male instrument. As the female approaches

upper-middle voice, she does not undergo as marked register alterations

as do the baritone, the bass-baritone, or the bass. The reverse of that

pedagogic coin is that male teachers often request greater energization from

the female in upper-middle voice than is desirable.

Singing is a matter not of general relaxation but of coordinating physical,

acoustic, and interpretive aspects into a dynamic equilibrium.

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I wander, why there are not a word about tenor voice? And one interesting moment: 'As the female approaches

upper-middle voice, she does not undergo as marked register alterations

as do the baritone, the bass-baritone, or the bass' - the tenor voice is not listed here. Am i right to think, that tenor's way of singing in zona di passaggio is more like female's?

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Miller has an entire book on tenors, he himself was one :)

Bear in mind, he speaks about operatic voices here, but negotiating the passagio works the same for both opera singers and popular singers. As for tenors, it will depend. Because they have light voices, some of them tend to use head-voice in speaking as well. Lower voices basically never do. So if you are a light-voiced guy used to jumping in head-voice when he speaks, you'll need less "bracing" when you enter the passagio, it seems to me.

Btw, if anyone at all has Miller's tenor book in e-book format, I'm begging them to send it to me :)

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Thanks for an explaination, i realy am a light-voiced tenor and i jump in head-voice while speaking sometimes, especialy when i am realy tired, and i never ever had problems of reachimg high notes, never struggled with passagio.

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Miller has an entire book on tenors, he himself was one :)

Bear in mind, he speaks about operatic voices here, but negotiating the passagio works the same for both opera singers and popular singers. As for tenors, it will depend. Because they have light voices, some of them tend to use head-voice in speaking as well. Lower voices basically never do. So if you are a light-voiced guy used to jumping in head-voice when he speaks, you'll need less "bracing" when you enter the passagio, it seems to me.

Btw, if anyone at all has Miller's tenor book in e-book format, I'm begging them to send it to me :)

trip, gotta jump in here. not all tenors have light voices.

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heres a great quote that i like by Jack Lavigni

"THERE IS NO CORRECT BREATH SUPPORT WITHOUT CORRECT PHONATION. You cannot support the voice correctly unless you have a correct balance in your voice’s resonance. The harmonics need to be tuned correctly in order for your mind to create a correct blueprint for the action of the diaphragm."

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one of the most stepped over, underrated vowels. few books talk of the merits of these vowels.

“The Divine Couplet Of Singing”—The OO and EE Vowels

On a bio/mechanical level, singing is, one might say, flexing vocal muscles musically; this means that the actions of singing organize the vocal muscles in such a way that they could perform the physical requirements of artistic singing in a strong and coordinated fashion. It’s in this light that the oo and ee vowels, in particular, have special significance. When they are properly created during the voice building process and effectively deployed, each represents extreme muscular actions, positions, and configurations in the larynx (voice box) and pharynx (throat and soft palate); in effect, they establish the general muscular framework of artful singing and—compared to all other vowel sounds—have the most control over its movement. The operative word here is extreme. The two vowels—both in their construction and actions—typically work antagonistically with respect to each other. When performed correctly, the oo sound has the unique effect of lengthening maximally the pharyngeal cavity (e.g. simultaneously lowering the larynx and raising the soft palate or (velum)—a movement that is basic to strong, healthy, full-throated singing, especially in the higher ranges. The ee vowel, moving in a contrasting direction, widens maximally a narrow area of the oral pharyngeal cavity at the back of the throat (the ee vowel also has the particular ability to elongate the vocal folds). The antagonistic relationship between these two vowels is the key to their special effectiveness: this muscular-tug-of-war—when amplified through voice building actions—results in increasing the strength and stability of each vowel (and, in fact, all vowels) as well as greater coordination in the overall movement of the vocal muscles. On an acoustical level, these actions could produce high-energy resonance that both energizes a voice and aids in high-note singing. Together the oo and ee vowels orientate and shape the essential movements, positions, and configurations of the vocal musculature during artful singing. I call this ee/oo vowel combination the “divine couplet of singing.”

Catona, Gary (2012-02-18). A Revolution in Singing (Kindle Locations 2374-2383). NwaPublishers.com. Kindle Edition.

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"The whole world may be going to Hell .... but Van Halen is going there on a yacht! And you're invited"

-David Lee Roth

Sorry, couldn't resist.

However, a memorable quote that does speak to singing.

"So, that's how they do that thing. What can my voice do?"

-Bruce Dickinson

"I don't think of the note in technical terms. I sing the emotion that I am feeling."

- Geoff Tate

"Do what it is that your voice can do. Don't do what it cannot do."

- John Bush

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trip, gotta jump in here. not all tenors have light voices.

I was talking about the untrained speaking voice that an opera voice teacher classifies as a tenor; that's what Miller's talking about, and we're talking about Miller :) Vocal habit can lend an edge and projection to a high speaking voice, but I've yet to hear one that sounds full and heavy.

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"The whole world may be going to Hell .... but Van Halen is going there on a yacht! And you're invited"

-David Lee Roth

Sorry, couldn't resist.

However, a memorable quote that does speak to singing.

"So, that's how they do that thing. What can my voice do?"

-Bruce Dickinson

"I don't think of the note in technical terms. I sing the emotion that I am feeling."

- Geoff Tate

"Do what it is that your voice can do. Don't do what it cannot do."

- John Bush

maybe john bush got to the point of figuring that out too soon.....lol!!!!!

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paraphrased -

"Don't spend all of your voice in warming-up. Save it for the performance. You only have so much milage in the voice" - Ronnie James Dio, as related by friend and touring partner, Ron Keel.

" I warm up about an hour before the show, backstage. Mainly, walking around with a maniacal grin, humming, finding my resonances. People give me the strangest looks." - Bruce Dickinson.

"When I was a child, I had the voice of an angel and I could make my grandmother cry. Now, I have a voice that sounds like 4 flat tires on a muddy road." - David Lee Roth.

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heres a great quote that i like by Jack Lavigni

"THERE IS NO CORRECT BREATH SUPPORT WITHOUT CORRECT PHONATION. You cannot support the voice correctly unless you have a correct balance in your voice’s resonance. The harmonics need to be tuned correctly in order for your mind to create a correct blueprint for the action of the diaphragm."

This is one of the greatest quotes ever.

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quote from "the tenor voice" but applicable to any voice type:

One of the most blatant faults of contemporary training occurs when teachers fail to make allowances for the “raw”, “crude”, almost uncontrollable vocal sounds that most beginners must produce during the early phases of training. Most teachers instead quickly attempt to obtain “polished”, “beautiful”, and highly-controlled vocal sounds from their students, which can only be produced by advanced professionals. For an untrained voice to progress from the crude vocal sounds of an amateur to the beautiful and highly-controlled vocal sounds of a professional is a matter of correct muscular development of the entire vocal instrument. It is not a matter of the singer comprehending the “esthetics, beauty, and subtleties of refined singing”, which some teachers wrongly assume, or imitating a famous artist of the day. Professional singers, too, are guilty of hindering beginners, in their failure to give testimonies of the earlier, less ideal stages of their voices, when they, too, could not produce controlled beautiful tones.

Anthony Frisell; Adolph Caso (2010-04-22). THE TENOR VOICE (Kindle Locations 424-433). Branden Books. Kindle Edition.

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quote from "the tenor voice" but applicable to any voice type:

One of the most blatant faults of contemporary training occurs when teachers fail to make allowances for the “raw”, “crude”, almost uncontrollable vocal sounds that most beginners must produce during the early phases of training. Most teachers instead quickly attempt to obtain “polished”, “beautiful”, and highly-controlled vocal sounds from their students, which can only be produced by advanced professionals. For an untrained voice to progress from the crude vocal sounds of an amateur to the beautiful and highly-controlled vocal sounds of a professional is a matter of correct muscular development of the entire vocal instrument. It is not a matter of the singer comprehending the “esthetics, beauty, and subtleties of refined singing”, which some teachers wrongly assume, or imitating a famous artist of the day. Professional singers, too, are guilty of hindering beginners, in their failure to give testimonies of the earlier, less ideal stages of their voices, when they, too, could not produce controlled beautiful tones.

Anthony Frisell; Adolph Caso (2010-04-22). THE TENOR VOICE (Kindle Locations 424-433). Branden Books. Kindle Edition.

You know what you are really starting to make me want to buy some of this Frisell stuff...He teaches many of the things that I preach on here all the time.

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frisell has a way of articulating well and sustantiating things. things you were not totally certain of and the reasons why.

he's the one that explained the antagonism between the musculatures and how important it is to strenghthen first the least used head voice musculature.

highly recommmended reading.

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frisell has a way of articulating well and sustantiating things. things you were not totally certain of and the reasons why.

he's the one that explained the antagonism between the musculatures and how important it is to strenghthen first the least used head voice musculature.

highly recommmended reading.

I understand his reasoning completely.

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A major talent of all superior singers is their skill in directing the breath stream into a specific resonance cavity where the assigned pitch is located. This skill can only be perfected when each of the five classical Italian vowels is being properly sung. Each correctly sung Italian vowel positions the upper posterior area of the mouth-pharynx cavity in a precise manner, one which enables the breath stream to flow freely into the desired resonance cavity, appropriate to the assigned pitch;upon arriving within the appropriate resonance cavity, the tone’s quality is automatically enhanced and its volume amplified due to the size and shape of the resonance cavity itself, all of which produces a superior tone.

Anthony Frisell; Adolph Caso (2010-04-22). THE TENOR VOICE (Kindle Locations 4529-4532). Branden Books. Kindle Edition.

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A major talent of all superior singers is their skill in directing the breath stream into a specific resonance cavity where the assigned pitch is located. This skill can only be perfected when each of the five classical Italian vowels is being properly sung. Each correctly sung Italian vowel positions the upper posterior area of the mouth-pharynx cavity in a precise manner, one which enables the breath stream to flow freely into the desired resonance cavity, appropriate to the assigned pitch;upon arriving within the appropriate resonance cavity, the tone’s quality is automatically enhanced and its volume amplified due to the size and shape of the resonance cavity itself, all of which produces a superior tone.

Anthony Frisell; Adolph Caso (2010-04-22). THE TENOR VOICE (Kindle Locations 4529-4532). Branden Books. Kindle Edition.

Bob what does that mean I'm confused break it down?

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i gather what he is saying here is when you direct the breath pressure to a specific resonating cavity and that corresponds to the particular note and the particular vowel you get the most efficient tone and therefore the most resonant tone.

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